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Pop/Rock - Released March 8, 2013 | Columbia

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - 5 étoiles Rock and Folk - 5/6 de Magic - Sélection du Mercury Prize
Say this for David Bowie: he has a flair for drama. This abiding love of the theatrical may not be as evident in the production of The Next Day as it is in its presentation, how Bowie sprung it upon the world early in 2013 following a decade of undeclared retirement. Reasons for Bowie's absence were many and few, perhaps related to a health scare in 2004, perhaps due to a creative dry spell, perhaps he simply didn't have songs to sing, or perhaps he had a lingering suspicion that by the time the new millennium was getting into full swing he was starting to be taken for granted. He had settled into a productive purple patch in the late '90s, a development that was roundly ignored by all except the devoted and the press, who didn't just give Hours, Heathen, and Reality a pass, they recognized them as a strong third act in a storied career. That same sentiment applies to The Next Day, an album recorded with largely the same team as Reality -- the same musicians and the same producer, his longtime lieutenant Tony Visconti -- and, appropriately, shares much of the same moody, meditative sound as its predecessor Heathen. What's different is the reception, which is appropriately breathless because Bowie has been gone so long we all know what we've missed. And The Next Day is designed to remind us all of why we've missed him, containing hints of the Thin White Duke and Ziggy Stardust within what is largely an elegant, considered evocation of the Berlin Bowie so calculating it opens with a reworking of "Beauty & The Beast," and is housed in an artful desecration of the Heroes LP cover. Unlike his Berlin trilogy of the late '70s, The Next Day is rarely unsettling. Apart from the crawling closer "Heat" -- a quiet, shimmering, hallucination-channeling late-'70s Scott Walker -- the album has been systematically stripped of eeriness, trading discomfort for pleasure at every turn. And pleasure it does deliver, as nobody knows how to do classic Bowie like Bowie and Visconti, the two life-long collaborators sifting through their past, picking elements that relate to what Bowie is now: an elder statesman who made a conscious decision to leave innovation behind long ago. This persistent, well-manicured nostalgia could account for the startling warmth that exudes from The Next Day; even when a melody sighs with an air of resigned melancholia, as it does on "Where Are We Now?," it never delves into sadness, it stays afloat in a warm, soothing bath. That overwhelming familiarity is naturally quite appealing for anyone well-versed in Bowie lore, but The Next Day isn't a career capper; it lacks the ambition to be anything so grand. The Next Day neither enhances nor diminishes anything that came before, it's merely a sweet coda to a towering career. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released June 4, 2012 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 8, 2016 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Rumors were rife: Definitive hibernation or even incurable disease - and then no - David Bowie made a blazing comeback in 2013 with the album The Next Day. Hardly time to fully digest this record and Ziggy is back already with the fascinating Blackstar, his 25th studio album published the day of his 69th birthday! 48 hours later, the shock is total as we learned of the death of the artist, carried away by a cancer after struggling against the disease for 18 months ... With Blackstar, once again we are tempted to say, Bowie surprises and amazes with a bold, and rather protean, experimental work (sometimes harking back to the likes of Station To Station/Low). A beautiful musical UFO that he designed with brilliant jazzmen in New York (including Maria Schneider and her orchestra but also guitarist Ben Monder and saxophonist Donny McCaslin) without forgetting the loyal Tony Visconti, ever behind the console to produce this beautiful black star. The star today is Bowie. Up there. Eternal and obviously immortal ... © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 19, 1998 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
After summing up his maverick tendencies on Scary Monsters, David Bowie aimed for the mainstream with Let's Dance. Hiring Chic guitarist Nile Rodgers as a co-producer, Bowie created a stylish, synthesized post-disco dance music that was equally informed by classic soul and the emerging new romantic subgenre of new wave, which was ironically heavily inspired by Bowie himself. Let's Dance comes tearing out of the gate, propulsed by the skittering "Modern Love," the seductively menacing "China Girl," and the brittle funk of the title track. All three songs became international hits, and for good reason -- they're catchy, accessible pop songs that have just enough of an alien edge to make them distinctive. However, that careful balance is quickly thrown off by a succession of pleasant but unremarkable plastic soul workouts. "Cat People" and a cover of Metro's "Criminal World" are relatively strong songs, but the remainder of the album indicates that Bowie was entering a songwriting slump. However, the three hits were enough to make the album a massive hit, and their power hasn't diminished over the years, even if the rest of the record sounds like an artifact. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released June 30, 2008 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions Sélection Disques de l'année Les Inrocks
Recorded from Bowie's first live American broadcast, this October 20, 1972 concert is a good choice for those who found themselves left cold by the awkward soul and the absence of Mick Ronson on David Live. Coming on the heels of the release of Ziggy Stardust, Bowie is captured here at the height of his creative powers. He gives a nod to the influence of Lou Reed with a fine "Waiting For The Man," and the live renditions of "Jean Genie" and "Rock and Roll Suicide" surpass the studio versions, thanks in no small part to the inimitable Mick Ronson. "Life on Mars?" and other tunes off Hunky Dory can be a bit disappointing, though, without original keyboardist Rick Wakeman, who was now busy becoming a star with Yes. But this is only a minor qualm; the Spiders band is wonderfully aggressive, all the more because live performance was perhaps the true home for its glam theatrics. ~ Paul Collins
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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Bowie first stepped onto the Glastonbury stage in 1971. “As of 1990 I got through the rest of the 20th century without having to do a big hits show. Yes, yes I know I did four or five hits on the later shows but I held out pretty well I thought…big, well-known songs will litter the field at Glastonbury this year. Well, with a couple of quirks of course”, David Bowie wrote at the time. In the year 2000, the Thin White Duke made an unforgettable impression on the UK’s largest music festival. Indeed, his set-list comprising of 21 tracks is a testament to the extent of his legacy. It includes the favourites: Starman, China Girl, Heroes, The Man Who Sold The World, Let’s Dance, Life On Mars?, Changes, Under Pressure, but also some quirkier gems: Stay, Golden Years, Wild Is The Wind, and the leading track from Station to Station (1975), the unusual, melancholic album that Lester Bangs considered to be his masterpiece.  Performing on stage with his long mane of hair, his ¾ Alexander McQueen coat and his XXL charisma, Bowie is on fire. He is joined by guitarist Earl Slick who replaced Mick Ronson when the Spiders From Mars broke up in 1974 and who at the time was the mastermind behind Diamond Dogs and David Live, Bowie’s first live recording. A true wonder to behold. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 21, 2002 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 29, 2018 | Rhino

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After completing Low and Heroes, the first two albums of his Berlin trilogy, David Bowie spent most of 1978 touring the world. During this huge tour, baptised as Isolar II, he sang in front of a million people across 70 concerts in 12 countries! The star was free from his addiction problems which up until then had seen him go on stage only after having ingested astronomical quantities of cocaine… Recorded in April and May 1978 and released in September the same year, the live Stage album showed a Bowie in full transition, struggling with his glam beginnings, his soul music future and his present new wave. First published for the occasion of the Record Store Days in April 2018, Welcome To The Blackout (Live London'78) also captures this period. Recorded at Earls Court in London on June 30th and July 1st 1979 by Tony Visconti, this is a previously unreleased double live album offering more energetic versions than those on stage. The fascinating tracks from Low and Heroes lose some of their eccentricity on stage. And the “old hits” like Rebel Rebel and Ziggy Stardust gain in luxury what they lose in violence, even if on Suffragette City the singer does seem totally possessed. Finally, the lead guitarist Adrian Belew and rhythmic guitarist Carlos Alomar knit together stunning interventions to accompany the Thin White Duke. An unmissable document for Bowie fans. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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When David Bowie's second album appeared in late 1969, he was riding high. His first ever hit single, the super-topical "Space Oddity," had scored on the back of the moon landing that summer, and so distinctive an air did it possess that, for a moment, its maker really did seem capable of soaring as high as Major Tom. Sadly, it was not to be. "Space Oddity" aside, Bowie possessed very little in the way of commercial songs, and the ensuing album (his second) emerged as a dense, even rambling, excursion through the folky strains that were the last glimmering of British psychedelia. Indeed, the album's most crucial cut, the lengthy "Cygnet Committee," was nothing less than a discourse on the death of hippiness, shot through with such bitterness and bile that it remains one of Bowie's all-time most important numbers -- not to mention his most prescient. The verse that unknowingly name-checks both the Sex Pistols ("the guns of love") and the Damned is nothing if not a distillation of everything that brought punk to its knees a full nine years later. The remainder of the album struggles to match the sheer vivacity of "Cygnet Committee," although "Unwashed and Slightly Dazed" comes close to packing a disheveled rock punch, all the more so as it bleeds into a half minute or so of Bowie wailing "Don't Sit Down" -- an element that, mystifyingly, was hacked from the 1972 reissue of the album. "Janine" and "An Occasional Dream" are pure '60s balladry, and "God Knows I'm Good" takes a well-meant but somewhat clumsy stab at social comment. Two final tracks, however, can be said to pinpoint elements of Bowie's own future. The folk epic "Wild Eyed Boy from Freecloud" (substantially reworked from the B-side of the hit) would remain in Bowie's live set until as late as 1973, while a re-recorded version of the mantric "Memory of a Free Festival" would become a single the following year, and marked Bowie's first studio collaboration with guitarist Mick Ronson. The album itself however, proved another dead end in a career that was gradually piling up an awful lot of such things. ~ Dave Thompson
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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released April 15, 2013 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 24, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released January 22, 2010 | Epic

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released November 11, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | Parlophone UK

Bowie first stepped onto the Glastonbury stage in 1971. “As of 1990 I got through the rest of the 20th century without having to do a big hits show. Yes, yes I know I did four or five hits on the later shows but I held out pretty well I thought…big, well-known songs will litter the field at Glastonbury this year. Well, with a couple of quirks of course”, David Bowie wrote at the time. In the year 2000, the Thin White Duke made an unforgettable impression on the UK’s largest music festival. Indeed, his set-list comprising of 21 tracks is a testament to the extent of his legacy. It includes the favourites: Starman, China Girl, Heroes, The Man Who Sold The World, Let’s Dance, Life On Mars?, Changes, Under Pressure, but also some quirkier gems: Stay, Golden Years, Wild Is The Wind, and the leading track from Station to Station (1975), the unusual, melancholic album that Lester Bangs considered to be his masterpiece.  Performing on stage with his long mane of hair, his ¾ Alexander McQueen coat and his XXL charisma, Bowie is on fire. He is joined by guitarist Earl Slick who replaced Mick Ronson when the Spiders From Mars broke up in 1974 and who at the time was the mastermind behind Diamond Dogs and David Live, Bowie’s first live recording. A true wonder to behold. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz

Artist

David Bowie in the magazine
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