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Symphonies - Released January 11, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | harmonia mundi

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After "Inventions", "Revelations" is the second volume in a complete set of the Beethoven quartets that breaks new ground: it aims to regroup the works according to their position within the three broad creative divisions of the composers life the formative years, the heroic period and the late period. This programme assembles the median quartets, in other words the works that prolonged and consolidated the stylistic innovations outlined at the beginning of each of these creative periods. © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
After "Inventions", "Revelations" is the second volume in a complete set of the Beethoven quartets that breaks new ground: it aims to regroup the works according to their position within the three broad creative divisions of the composers life the formative years, the heroic period and the late period. This programme assembles the median quartets, in other words the works that prolonged and consolidated the stylistic innovations outlined at the beginning of each of these creative periods. © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
After "Inventions", "Revelations" is the second volume in a complete set of the Beethoven quartets that breaks new ground: it aims to regroup the works according to their position within the three broad creative divisions of the composers life the formative years, the heroic period and the late period. This programme assembles the median quartets, in other words the works that prolonged and consolidated the stylistic innovations outlined at the beginning of each of these creative periods. © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released February 22, 2019 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Classical - To be released April 12, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Opera - Released March 8, 2019 | Orfeo

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Classical - To be released April 12, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released February 22, 2019 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Symphonic Music - Released March 15, 2019 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - To be released March 22, 2019 | Paraty

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Classical - Released February 13, 2019 | EXTON

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Classical - Released February 17, 2019 | Classical Piano 101

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Classical - Released March 19, 2019 | Editions Audiovisuel Beulah

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Solo Piano - Released February 9, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
Oh no, no, no: this is absolutely not a re-release of one of the many recordings which Murray Perahia made of Beethoven over the decades. This here is something completely new, made in 2016 and 2017, of two radically contrasting sonatas: the Fourteenth of 1801, which Rellstab nicknamed "Clair de lune" in 1832, while Beethoven merely dubbed it Quasi una fantasia, and the Twenty Ninth of 1819, Große Sonate für das Hammerklavier, written after several barren years. Perhaps, consciously or not, Perahia has coupled two works, one "before" and the other "after" - after all, he himself has known his fair share of fallow years, following a hand injury which removed him from the stage from 1990 to 2005. Whether or not it's true, it's certainly tempting to imagine. Either way, like Beethoven, Perahia made a storming return, as shown in this recent performance, in which vigour alternates with moments of intense introspection, always impeccably phrased and articulated, and deeply musical. Clearly all those years in which he concentrated almost exclusively on the works of Bach as a training regime while he waited for recovery seem to have in fact been immensely fruitful. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
When talking about Carlos Kleiber's conducting style and recording catalogue, it is easy to over-use superlatives. Perhaps the secrets of his art are best expressed in the cover picture, with the mad elegance of his gestures, which seem to summon up the music through sheer energy, subtlety and a radiant smile: he seems absolutely possessed by inspiration. But listening to this album should do the trick too. Living as a recluse, cancelling three quarters of his concerts, hardly ever recording, it was like a miracle when Carlos Kleiber agreed to set down these two symphonies for Deutsche Grammphon. In 1975, he recorded the 5th Symphony in the generous surroundings of the Vienna Musikverein, with a Philharmonic that hung off his every word and followed his slightest gesture. Under his philosopher's baton, the "5th" became pure, distilled energy, an explosive Pandora's box that gave off sparks and followed the demands of the score precisely. The fateful four notes around which the entire symphony was built were at once the foundation and the capstone of this landmark work, magnificently structured here by Kleiber. Has there ever been such a tempestuous and light-footed Seventh Symphony? One thinks immediately of Nietzsche: "I would believe only in a God that knows how to dance". Recorded the following year, in the same place, this Seventh soars, pirouettes and exults in a pantheist, saving joy, with a lightness that seems to lift the musicians off the floor. "Now am I light, now do I fly; now do I see myself under myself. Now there danceth a God in me.". Thus directed Carlos Kleiber. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet
An honorary citizen of the town of Cremorna, the birthplace of Antonio Stradivari and many other makers of stringed instruments, in 2017 the Quartetto di Cremona finished its complete recordings of Beethoven's quartets, which they started in 2013, and which are presented here in a single album. This is an opportunity to rediscover the extent to which these recordings reign supreme over a discography which is hardly short of stand-out recordings, starting with the one by their former colleagues of the Quartetto Italiano which remains one of the greatest in the history of the music. Either using the four Stradivariuses loaned them by a Japanese foundation, or the prestigious instruments provided by a German cultural foundation (by Guadagnini, Testor, Torazzi and Amati), the Quartetto di Cremorna brings us Beethoven's whole range of expression, from the Haydnian humour and rhythmical vigour of the Opus 18 to the metaphysical depths of the final quartets, by way of the serene luminosity of the Razoumovski quartets. In their performances, which foreground dynamic contrasts, sometimes to excess, sonic finesse is constantly blended with expressive depth and a savvy mix of heart and brain. The presentation here is not chronological, but follows the release of albums which each presented different quartets in three of Beethoven's "styles" according to the method of Wilhelm von Lenz, which prevailed in the 19th century after 1852. The serious fan could easily arrange these quartets for listening in an order of their own preference. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Quartets - Released September 29, 2017 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This 2017 release by Austria's Quatuor Mosaïques is actually the second in a series; the first box, covering Beethoven's early quartets, appeared in 1994. Whether they thought about the difficult late quartets for 23 years or other projects simply intervened, this volume has been worth the wait. (The middle quartets are apparently still to come.) As before, the Quatuor Mosaïques uses gut strings and historically authentic bows, as well as a tuning slightly below the usual A=440. There are few recordings of Beethoven's quartets made on instruments with aspects of historical construction (not really "historical instruments," for plenty of players use old instruments), and the result is immediately distinctive. The level of vibrato is low, but not outlandishly so. Instead, the most unusual aspect of the performances are their fluidity and grace, made possible by the gentle sound of the strings and by bows that do not dig into the attacks the way modern ones do. Beethoven's quartets are known for their extremity: the almost unplayable Grosse Fuge, Op. 133 (which here is made quite a bit more manageable by the historical bows), the vast and almost unthinkable modal slow movement of the String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132, the bizarrely humorous String Quartet No. 16 in F major, Op. 135. Yet such extremity is balanced by passages of great simplicity: Beethoven offers a plethora of straightforward, hummable, folkish tunes, of which the most famous one is not in a quartet but in the finale of the Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125. Here, note the effect that the Quatuor Mosaïques' light touch has on the seven-movement String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 131, which loses its ponderous qualities and emerges as a kind of suite. The group takes its tempos on the fast side in the main, and in a few places they seem to skate over the surface of the music rather than plumbing its great depths. But in the Grosse Fuge and the Op. 132 slow movement they are very strong. Recommended, and beautifully recorded.