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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | audite Musikproduktion

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An honorary citizen of the town of Cremorna, the birthplace of Antonio Stradivari and many other makers of stringed instruments, in 2017 the Quartetto di Cremona finished its complete recordings of Beethoven's quartets, which they started in 2013, and which are presented here in a single album. This is an opportunity to rediscover the extent to which these recordings reign supreme over a discography which is hardly short of stand-out recordings, starting with the one by their former colleagues of the Quartetto Italiano which remains one of the greatest in the history of the music. Either using the four Stradivariuses loaned them by a Japanese foundation, or the prestigious instruments provided by a German cultural foundation (by Guadagnini, Testor, Torazzi and Amati), the Quartetto di Cremorna brings us Beethoven's whole range of expression, from the Haydnian humour and rhythmical vigour of the Opus 18 to the metaphysical depths of the final quartets, by way of the serene luminosity of the Razoumovski quartets. In their performances, which foreground dynamic contrasts, sometimes to excess, sonic finesse is constantly blended with expressive depth and a savvy mix of heart and brain. The presentation here is not chronological, but follows the release of albums which each presented different quartets in three of Beethoven's "styles" according to the method of Wilhelm von Lenz, which prevailed in the 19th century after 1852. The serious fan could easily arrange these quartets for listening in an order of their own preference. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Duets - Released August 10, 2018 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Two young Belgian soloists—including Lorenzo Gatto, despite the Italian consonance of the name—have been gathering for several years around Beethoven, and here is their interpretation of three Beethoven sonatas: the First written even before the end of the 18th Century—1798—, followed by the very last that is the Tenth Op. 96 from 1812—created by the infamous Pierre Rode on violin, and the archduke Rudolph of Austria who, incidentally, must have been an amazing pianist—, to finish with one of the most famous ones, the Fifth called “The Spring Sonata” (a name not chosen by the composer). Despite dating “only” from 1801, this sonata is incredibly different from the First regarding its architectural maturity, its intense lyricism and its audacities of all kinds. Gatto, who won the Queen Elisabeth Competition, plays on nothing less than the Stradivarius “Joachim”, while Libeer, a chamber music enthusiast, has a field day on a big concert piano with parallel strings and of an almost orchestral sound. Their first volume, released in 2016, was more than noticed by the critics and the audience—and was a great success on Qobuz. © SM/Qobuz
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Trios - Released July 20, 2018 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
With this new series entitled ‘Salon de musique’, Alpha presents recordings made by artists who have enlivened the Festival of Salon de Provence for some years now: the pianist Eric le Sage, who has made many recordings for Alpha, the clarinettist Paul Meyer etc… with cellist Claudio Bohórquez, they have now put two Beethoven trios on disc. By 1798, the year Ludwig van Beethoven composed his Trio for piano, clarinet and cello op.11, he was already well-known in Vienna as a remarkable improviser and an ambitious young composer. the piece was clearly aimed at the enlightened aristocracy, as well as competent musical amateurs. This did not prevent the critics, though universally positive, from judging the score to be over-complex in places. Dedicated to the Empress Marie-Theresa of Austria, the Septet was published in 1802 by Hofmeister, and on being well-received it was then rearranged for various combinations. Beethoven himself made a version for clarinet, cello and piano, op.38 in E Flat major – the one recorded here. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
In several ways, this is a completely fresh reading of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, and Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major, Op. 73 ("Emperor"). Given the sheer volume of interpretations on the market, that's not an easy thing to achieve, and regardless of what your impressions may be of what pianist Nicholas Angelich and conductor Laurence Equilbey have accomplished here, this is the kind of recording that demands to be heard. There are historically oriented performances of Beethoven, but this one falls into a rarer category, for Beethoven at least: the recording that is informed by historical practices, but does not submerge itself in them. Angelich's piano is an early, 20th century Pleyel instrument, pointed and clear without being especially loud. The Insula Orchestra is small and plays on period instruments. The result is a light, transparent sound that evokes the orchestras of Beethoven's time in its dimensions. Equilbey and Angelich further state that they aim to cultivate an improvisatory feel in these two concertos. In the Piano Concerto No. 4 this works beautifully. The general dynamic level is quiet; the music seems to rise at the beginning from a point of stasis; and the whole reading seems spontaneous, even though it has clearly been worked out down to small details. The Piano Concerto No. 5, self-consciously grand, would seem a more difficult candidate for such treatment, but Angelich delivers percussive power where necessary, for instance in the big piano entrance and arpeggio flourish in the first movement. And sample the finale, around the three-minute mark for instance, where Angelich and Equilbey find a strong element of dialogue that has escaped other musicians. The sound engineering from Insula's Seine Musicale home base is an excellent aid to the whole enterprise, which is strongly recommended.
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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Keyboard Concertos - Released March 2, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
This is the final volume in a Beethoven concerto cycle by German pianist Lars Vogt that has been generally acclaimed for its freshness and detail. Vogt both plays and conducts the Royal Northern Sinfonia, of which he is music director, and the result has been interpretations in which pianist and orchestra achieve an unusual kind of sync. The results are spectacular in the Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, where Vogt eases into each movement, as it were, letting details accrete and add power. Sample the final movement, where the orchestra begins at a very low dynamic level, and Vogt weaves piano and orchestra together convincingly as the music proceeds. The first two movements open in circumspect ways but, as they develop, reveal Beethoven the virtuoso as Viennese audiences must have experienced him; note especially the curious clipped treatment of the second movement's orchestral theme, so different from the stomping giant favored by most conductors. The final diminished fifth comes out in sharp, chilling relief here. Vogt's approach is a bit less successful in the early Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 19, where the syncopations ring and rock, but the basic Mozartian shapes of the themes are indistinct. Nevertheless, Vogt's Beethoven recordings are major statements, and this album is no exception.
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Symphonies - Released October 19, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released November 9, 2018 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Challenge Classics

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Classical - Released April 27, 2018 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 17, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 16, 2018 | Challenge Classics

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The year 1808 was a period of superlative productivity for Beethoven: In the midst of all this, Beethoven somehow found the time and energy to compose two major piano trios. They were completed while Beethoven was living with Countess Marie Erdödy, to whom the trios were also dedicated. Some previous piano trios were rather lengthy affairs with pretentions to the symphonic repertoire, but the opening movement of Op. 70 No. 1 immediately lets the listener know that this time, things are different. The piece starts seemingly in medias res with a tempestuous figure in all three instruments at the same time. The second movement is the one that gave the trio its nickname ‘ghost’. Carl Czerny, Beethoven’s student, seems to have been the first to use this name. According to him, the movement ‘resembles an appearance from the underworld. One could think not inappropriately of the first appearance of the ghost in Hamlet’. Superficially, the sibling of the ‘Ghost’ may seem closer to Haydn and Mozart in style. For a long time, the Variations Op. 44 were known as ‘Variations on an Original Theme’, as the first publication did not name the theme. It has since been identified as a theme by Dittersdorf. The variations were presumably written in 1792 and published in 1804, when various other early works were being offered to publishers. © Challenge Classics
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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | Sony Classical

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