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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Although he's alone on the cover, baritone Christian Gerhaher has given a lot of space over to soprano Camilla Tilling in his Schumann record. And so the original tones – and therefore the cycle's structure – are preserved. The voices mingle and their dialogue reminds us that these Lieder were presented to Clara like a wedding bouquet. The sound recording sometimes plunges both voice and piano into a maelstrom of noise. But happily, the performers offer an amorous reading of these poems borrowed from Goethe, or Rückert, or Burns. Both singers savour each consonant and give the poems a resounding, perfect pronunciation, and an unerring sense of diction (take Camilla Tilling's oh-so-sensual repetition of Kuß in Die Lotosblume, every bit as distracting as Margaret Price's), and of recital (the successive episodes of Hochländers Abschied take life in the hands of Christian Gerhaher, a virtuoso of nuance). With accompaniment from pianist Gerold Huber, they have created a very fine record that brings to life that marvellous poet of sound, Schumann. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released September 27, 2019 | Sony Music Classical Local

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released September 20, 2019 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
On its face, this 2019 release by John Eliot Gardiner and the London Symphony Orchestra seems fairly straightforward and standard, with an overture at the opening and two symphonies by the great Romantic composer Robert Schumann occupying the rest of the program. Yet listeners may consider that it is far from routine on further investigation. The overture to Genoveva is the only part of Schumann's 1850 opera that is regularly performed nowadays, though it remains relatively obscure when compared to other overtures that serve to open concerts. Heard more frequently, the Symphony No. 2 in C major has had a fairly stable performance history, though like Schumann's other symphonies, it hasn't achieved the status of greatness accorded to the symphonies of Beethoven or Brahms, and remains in the second tier of 19th century symphonies. The Symphony No. 4 in D minor, however, may startle listeners who were expecting the long-established version of 1851. Instead, Gardiner has chosen the original 1841 version, which Clara Schumann described as unfinished sketches, but which Brahms favored over the revised version and revealed it to be complete when he published it in 1891. Chronologically, this was actually Schumann's second symphony, though it was first published after the two intervening symphonies and became the Fourth by default. Schumann's leaner orchestration has not been smoothed over or thickened with the later excessive doublings of woodwinds and strings, and while the form is almost identical to the later version, experienced listeners should note the many differences which are evident in this reading. The live recording by LSO Live captures the orchestra's sound with great clarity and fine details, which certainly makes Schumann's richly scored music easier to follow with pleasure. © TiVo
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Solo Piano - Released February 1, 2019 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Lieder (German) - Released November 16, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Record of the Month
Very different from Schubert’s Lieder, which are chants according to German “popular” tradition (usually strophic) with a musical accompaniment subservient to the singing (taking nothing away from their incredible genius!), Schumann’s are, to use Christian Gerhaher’s words, “lyrical dramaturgy”; miniature operas in which the piano and vocals are equal in content. This doesn’t explain why Schumann’s Lieder are so rarely performed in concert, with the exception of some well-worn cycles (normally Myrten, Dichterliebe and Frauenliebe und –leben). Gerhaher and his pianist Gerold Huber pick works from the genre’s ample repertoire that have almost never been performed in concert. Only three cycles date back to the “Liederyear” of 1840 (incidentally the year of his marriage to Clara Wieck), while the others are from the composer’s last years, beyond 1850, and are full of nostalgia… This is far from the dishevelled romanticism of his early years, the mood is dark and the discourse broken up into small brushstrokes. The contrast from one era to the other is striking. Gerhaher and Huber perform these surprising marvels brilliantly. © SM/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released September 14, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released September 14, 2018 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released May 11, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
One doesn't often get a chance to hear Schumann's Vom Pagen und der Königstochter ("Of the Page and the King's Daughter") a score from 1852 in the form of an epic drama in four movements, for soloists, choir and orchestra. In it, the composer uses the form of a recitative with accompaniment which surely prefigures high Wagner in terms of the vocal and orchestral treatment. The album continues with another rarity, the Cantata BWV 105 by Bach as revised by Schumann, probably for a performance when he was the musical director at Düsseldorf. For sure, the "arrangement" is pretty modest – or, rather, non-existent – in the choral overture and the first recitative, with the first big surprise coming in for the first soprano air: instead of an oboe interweaving finely with the singing, Schumann plumped for... the clarinet! You'll love it or hate it. The following recitative, a sublime bass arioso, also unadulterated; the bass aria which follows uses a romantic horn instead of the corno da tirarsi stipulated by Bach, a fairly modest alteration; the final chorale is also untouched, up to and including the extraordinary "slowing-down" writing for strings, which is entirely Bach's. The main difference here has to do with the fact that the Helsinki Baroque Orchestra plays on instruments from Schumann's century and in keeping with Romantic attitudes – something which Bach's score can happily handle, precisely because this is one of his most "Romantic" cantatas. The album closes – as remarkable as it may seem – on a discographic world first for Schumann! It seems that the Adventlied Op. 71 was never recorded until this album was made. That being said, it's clear why singers and orchestras haven't been in a hurry to tackle this rather ethereal, bloodless score: a blind listen would rather give the impression that this is a nice try by a forgotten composer at putting out some sub-Schumann stuff. But at least the enthusiast can now boast of having heard a "lost" Schumann! © SM/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released May 4, 2018 | Challenge Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
This is the third album for Challenge Classics from the excellent Israeli pianist Einav Yarden, who, having made the most of the world of Haydn, and before that Beethoven and Stravinsky, is now taking on the most complex figure in early German romanticism, Robert Schumann, by way of a repertoire that is in part fairly original (Drei Fantasiestücke Op. 111 to start) but also well-trodden (Fantasie Op. 17, Waldszenen) by his fellow musicians. The tough competition should not distract you, however, from this musician, who is still little known in these parts, a student of Leon Fleisher at the Peabody Conservatory, much beloved of Elisso Virsaladze, and who first trained in Israel. His performances of Schumann set themselves apart with their striving for structural clarity and ample phrasing, which sometimes presages Brahms, rather than a drive for lyricism or for sweetly febrile poetry. © Théodore Grantet/Qobuz The three works on this album span a period of fifteen years – years in which the young Schumann suffered forcible separation from his beloved Clara, followed by their marriage and a brief period of relative calm, to the increasing bouts of mental instability which were to close him off from the world around him until his death. The piano Fantasiestücke op. 111 was composed in 1851 during a time of deteriorating mental health and increasing disillusionment with his post as Music Director of the Düsseldorf Music Society. In contrast to the youthfully extrovert Fantasiestücke op. 12 of 1837, these three untitled pieces are “of a serious and passionate character”, as Clara described them, their bold harmonies intensifying their expressivity. The Fantasie in C major op. 17 is one of Schumann’s most powerful large-scale piano works, composed during the bitter period of his enforced separation from Clara. Schumann completed his cycle of nine forest piano miniatures, Waldszenen, in 1849, while struggling with increasing bouts of mental instability and depression. Each piece is headed by a descriptive title. These masterly tone paintings display Schumann’s genius in creating miniature images consummate in expression, characterisation and mood. © Challenge Classics
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Symphonic Music - Released March 9, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Quartets - Released September 8, 2017 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
It’s in a small comic filled with self-derision that the Modigliani Quartet describe their background, from the founding of the quartet in 2003 to its beginnings at the Berliner Philharmonie in 2017: First Prize Winners of the Young Concert Artists in New York, which opened the doors of the Carnegie Hall to them in 2006, Grand Prix Winners of Académie Charles Cros two years later with Haydn, artistic directors of the Evian Festival in 2014… An impressive and international pedigree for this quartet originally founded by four students of the Conservatoire de Paris keen to try their hands on the greatest chamber music repertoire. This new recording of the sole three quartets of Schumann, works created in one go in 1842 – two years after 1840, “the year of the Lied”, and one year before the two chamber masterpieces that are the Piano Quartet and the Piano Quintet. It’s true that in these quartets, Schumann doesn’t stray too far from Beethoven and even less from Mendelssohn (posthumously dedicatee), maybe the consequence of an inevitably more linear and contrapuntal writing, not as harmonic as the addition of a piano would allow. The fact remains that the Modiglianis capture these three singular works and restore their lines rather than looking for a dense, symphonic and pianistic texture that is not theirs. © SM/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released March 17, 2017 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released March 17, 2017 | Odradek Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released August 26, 2016 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Trios - Released April 1, 2016 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Symphonic Music - Released March 18, 2016 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released March 18, 2016 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released February 26, 2016 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Lieder (German) - Released November 20, 2015 | Challenge Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik