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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 13 december 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 21 september 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

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For this third and final part of The Lord of the Rings (released in 2003 and adapted from Tolkien’s famous book), Howard Shore once again benefited from the exceptional opportunity to create 3h50m of music, which covers 90% of the film! Other than the London Philharmonic Orchestra, there is a wide variety of choirs and prestigious soloists. The latter are sometimes even actors in the films: The Green Dragon is an Irish-inspired tune, performed by the actor Billy Boyd, a.k.a. Pippin. Other soloists (both actors and not) include the famous flautist James Galway, as well as Viggo Mortensen and Renée Fleming. All three are present in The Fellowship Reunited.On the instrumental side of things, we hear several leitmotifs, some of which are already known (and sometimes developed), others completely new. One of the most beautiful phrases related to the ring appears in the first track, Roots and Beginnings, and evokes Richard Wagner's own ring theme from the opera Der Ring des Nibelungen. The simplicity of this short melodic phrase (only nine notes long) shows that Howard Shore wanted to personify the ring and not the stakes that it represents. Far from the strange calm of this music, we also encounter more epic, even horrific pieces, such as the amazing Shelob's Lair. Howard Shore is David Cronenberg's appointed composer, and in this respect, an undeniable specialist in the field. Finally, it’s worth listening to the majestic song Into the West as the closing credits roll, with Annie Lennox on mic. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 18 december 2019 | Walt Disney Records

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We all know married couples who have been together for decades that stand the test of time and remain the perfect match. Well, John Williams and Star Wars have been together for 42 years! Out of the twelve films of the series, only 2 were soundtracked by people other than Steven Spielberg’s favourite composer (he was replaced by Kevin Kiner for The Clone Wars in 2008 and by Michael Giacchino for 2016’s Rogue One: A Star Wars Story). This rare sort of intimate relationship between a composer and their subject matter allows for a thorough use of leitmotif, a technique especially used in Star Wars. After so many years spent working with them, certain melodic phrases that characterise a particular person or decor eventually gain varying degrees of complexity and subtlety. This is the case with Rey’s Theme, which aficionados may or may not recognise in certain scenes of The Rise of Skywalker. For John Williams’ “ultimate contribution” to the Star Wars franchise, he has cleverly and covertly brought together all the themes associated with the main characters of the saga onto this soundtrack, from Leia to Yoda via Darth Vader. In some scenes, Williams’ attitude appears to be that of an old friend who is rejoicing at the prospect of going back to characters that you may have lost track of over the years. Case in point: Lando Calrissian (played by Billy Dee Williams and who appeared for the first time in Episode V in 1980) makes his return, to the sound of a particularly joyous melody. This kind of friendly nod to fans lends the film a certain kind of humanity, where many would have considered it the product of pure consumerism. Of course, the majestic (Destiny of a Jedi), epic (Battle of the Resistance) and lyrical (The Force is With You) atmosphere reigns supreme and defines the essential dynamic of this music so iconic in today’s pop culture. This ninth film of the saga is a finale of sorts for John Williams, but The Rise of Skywalker also presented him with an unexpected debut: at 87 years old, he appears for the first time in one of the films with a cameo as Oma Tres, the bartender on planet Kijimi! © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 7 november 2006 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Howard Shore’s themes for Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy are often considered as some of the greatest accomplishments in the history of movie soundtracks. By virtue of its operatic length, first: just for this second volume (available here in its entirety), the listener can enjoy this music for more than three hours! But first and foremost, we have to highlight here the extremely rich and inventive artistic performance of the composer of the movies of David Cronenberg, as well as Ed Wood, After Hours and Mrs. Doubtfire. For this second episode released in 2002 (called The Two Towers), the Canadian composer reuses here and there the epic and moving themes from the first volume, by injecting into them more darkness and ambiguity, as proven by the opening track (Glamdring, with Maori choruses), as well as tracks associated to Gollum that skillfully blend shadow and light (My Precious). This soundtrack is also filled with new themes like the one, epic and majestic, devoted to the Rohirrim, the riders of Middle-earth (The Plains of Rohan). But Shore’s score wouldn’t be complete without this Celtic flavor that the composer scatters with subtlety throughout this titanic partition—thus reminding that one of the influences of Tolkien, the author of the novels, was Irish mythology. Dermot Crehan (violin) and the great flutist James Galway (tin and low whistle) are usually responsible for bringing to this score this particular color (Edoras ; Ent-draught). In this regard, it is worth noting the impressive number of soloists inside Shore’s partition, something quite rare for a so-called “symphonic” partition. Naturally, throughout his work, the composer endeavors to respect to the letter the narrative and visual world of Tolkien and Jackson, thus intending it for the fans of the saga. But this rich and subtle original soundtrack proves in a blatant way that Howard Shore also wanted to speak to the heart of every music lover, whether they knew Tolkien’s fantastical world or not. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 5 oktober 2018 | A Star is Born OST

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 18 december 2014 | WaterTower Music

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The late Michel Legrand maintained that a good film score must make itself heard. Hans Zimmer would probably agree. This is especially the case when listening to his soundtrack of this science-fiction film directed by Christopher Nolan (2014), now offered in a deluxe version and featuring eight unreleased tracks. The German-born composer’s taste for synthesizers is well known and he stays true to this for Interstellar as the score’s skeleton is produced by Zimmer himself using a plethora of impressive machinery. He has added an orchestra comprising of 34 strings, 24 woodwinds and 4 pianos to the electronic sounds so as to give the score body of massive scale. On top of this, one can hear the organ of Temple Church in London (Dreaming of the Crash, Cornfield Chase, Coward, Where We’re Going…), as well as choir of 60 singers. In other words, Zimmer provides us with one of the most ambitious film scores (at least logistically).What stands out is that Zimmer has not hesitated to take risks or experiment here. The choir, for example, is recorded unusually at distance from the microphones (No Time for Caution). Zimmer explains how he envisaged the score: “The further we get away from Earth in the movie, the more the sound is generated by humans—but an alienation of human sounds. Like the video messages in the movie, they're a little more corroded, a little more abstract.” Amongst this crazy and dizzying work tracks that are strangely more stripped down can be found, such as a distant piano solo entitled Message from Home. With Interstellar, Hans Zimmer (Rain Man, Inception, The Thin Red Line…) forcefully combines all his talents to create sounds that are both strange and relentlessly emotional. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 1 december 2017 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 11 juli 2019 | Walt Disney Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2019 | WaterTower Music

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While bringing the characters from DC Comics to life, director Todd Philips uses Joker to confront real-world problems - particularly how neglected, bullied individuals are treated in Western societies. The Joker (played by Joaquin Phoenix) suffers from mental illness and lives with his mother in a squalid apartment. After being abandoned by Gotham City Social Services he gradually turns into a psychotic killer, murdering three men who represent the elite and becoming a hero for a handful of rejected and forgotten citizens. In a highly stylised yet nevertheless realistic context, the Joker’s intrusion into the world of superheroes is reflected in the film’s soundtrack. The music is characterised by striking contrasts, with feel-good retro songs on the one hand and extremely dark non-diegetic music on the other. Composed by the Icelandic cellist Hildur Guðnadóttir, Joker’s soundtrack revolves around threatening percussion and layers of deep, throbbing strings (contrasting against the higher-pitched ones in Charlie Chaplin’s song Smile). Occasionally, a choir appears in the soundtrack, acting as a common link between the two atmospheres. Some of the highlights of the soundtrack include Defeated Clown and Following Sophie, two tracks which are wrapped around a persistent drum pattern. Other gems include the heartbreaking Subway, the staccato strings in Penny Taken to the Hospital and the moving, triumphant climax Call Me Joker. A unique and passionate soundtrack by a woman who some consider to be the successor to the late Johann Johannsson. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 1 juli 2016 | Rhino - Warner Records

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In 1999 neemt gitarist Eric Clapton het initiatief voor het Crossroads Guitar Festival, om geld op te halen voor zijn afkickkliniek Crossroads Centre Antigua. Op het jaarlijkse evenement treden tal van gitaargrootheden op zoals B.B. King, Hubert Sumlin en Jeff Beck. In 2016 verschijnt het driedubbele album Crossroads Revisited: Selections From the Crossroads Guitar Festivals. Op het album is een overzicht te vinden van de beste optredens tijdens het festival door de jaren heen. © TiVo
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 24 januari 2020 | Milan Records

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The two composers of the soundtrack for the first season of The Witcher are not (yet) stars of the film music genre, but they are certainly on their way there, given the phenomenal success of the series and its music. Giona Ostinelli is a Swiss-Italian composer, known for her work on a televised adaptation of a Stephen King novel (The Mist), whereas Sonya Belousova is a Russian pianist who was recognised in 2015 for the album Player Piano, produced by Stan Lee (Marvel). In 2019, they produced the soundtrack to The Witcher, an eight-episode-long series created by Lauren Schmidt Hissrich and broadcast on Netflix in the same year. The television adaptation is based on the literary saga of the same name, written by ‘Polish Tolkien’ Andrzej Sapkowski. The first season is based on The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny, a series of short stories which precede the main saga of The Witcher. Given the subject matter of The Witcher, it should not come as a surprise to find several pieces with Celtic and medieval connotations, whether they be dances with fiddle or tin whistle solos (They’re Alive, I’m Helping the Idiot), or ethereal voices accompanied by harps (Tomorrow I’ll Leave Blaviken For Good). Rodion Belousov’s expressive oboe solos deserve an honourable mention in Happy Childhoods Make For Dull Company and Rewriting History. As for the action music, even though the powerful rhythms are dominant, the traditional fibre remains running through the music (It’s An Ultimatum). Finally, if the music from The Witcher is so successful, it surely owes a lot of this fame to its songs, especially Toss A Coin To Your Witcher, the tune sung by the bard Jaskier (Joey Batey) and countlessly covered and parodied on social media. Both the songs and the instrumental music from The Witcher possess a poetic and melodic power, rare enough to be worthy of note. To this end, they equally have an intrinsic interest, and you can enjoy listening to it away from the visuals. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 26 juli 2019 | Columbia

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 13 januari 2017 | Sony Classical

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 18 september 2014 | Hollywood Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 1 januari 1977 | Walt Disney Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 1 januari 1980 | Walt Disney Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 15 november 2019 | Walt Disney Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 8 mei 2020 | Rock Action Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 20 december 2019 | Sony Classical

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For this feature based on a story from the First World War that his grandfather told him, director Sam Mendes chose to film a two-hour-long sequence shot. The radical cinematic concept could have led the composer Thomas Newman to create a score with only one musical colour and theme. Therefore, in order to accompany this “pedestrian road-movie” telling the story of two British soldiers who are tasked with bringing a crucial message to another squad, the composer behind the score for Skyfall (another Mendes film) chose to play the card of eclecticism, but also of surprise. Before being released into the wild, the characters rush around the famous trenches of the Great War. In Up The Down Trench, Newman incorporates electronic elements (that are therefore anachronistic), in order to accompany this journey filmed by Steadicam. Are we in a modern video game or in a real-life documentary on the First World War? Such is the ambiguity of the cinematic tour de force in which the music plays such an essential part. For other parts of the film, Thomas Newman is slightly more literal, using sonic textures as foggy as the plains of Northern France (The Boche) and incorporating particularly tense, nightmarish moments (Tripwire). Sometimes, the tension is more subtle like in the piece Gehenna, made up of 12 notes played on the piano (then by strings), grouped into four groups of three. Gehenna is a biblical place that signifies hell, which translates this melodic repetition, so discomforting in its strange irregularity. Alongside these atmospheres that are rare in Newman’s work, there are also ideas that conform more to his usual style, especially the tender and dream-like A Bit Of Tin and Come Back To Us. As for The Night Window, it’s probably one of the high points of the score due to its emotional scale. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz

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Originele soundtracks in het magazine