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Something In The Air

David Bowie

Rock - Released March 12, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

Something in the Air (Live in Paris '99) captures David Bowie live at the Elysée Montmartre on the October 14, 1999. Featuring 12 previously unreleased tracks, the live show sees Bowie not only playing songs from his 1999 release Hours… but digging deep into his back catalog. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Tryin' To Get To Heaven / Mother

David Bowie

Rock - Released January 8, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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ChangesNowBowie

David Bowie

Rock - Released August 28, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

On 9th January 1997, David Bowie celebrated his 50th birthday in style on stage in New York’s Madison Square Garden with Lou Reed, Robert Smith, Sonic Youth, Frank Black and a few other guests. Two months earlier, the Thin White Duke had rehearsed for the event with bassist Gail Ann Dorsey, guitarist Reeves Gabrels and keyboardist Mark Plati. Nine tracks from their rehearsals were recorded. The BBC broadcast them on the 8th January 1997 - the star’s birthday. And now they’re finally available on record: ChangesNowBowie. The album essentially consists of acoustic versions of songs from his huge repertoire. With great finesse and sensitivity, Bowie covers classics like The Man Who Sold The World, Quicksand and Aladdin Sane, as well as the slightly lesser-known tracks The Supermen (from The Man Who Sold The World), Repetition (from Lodger) and Shopping For Girls (from Tin Machine’s second album). There’s also an anxiety-inducing cover of White Light/White Heat by The Velvet Underground, where Gabrel’s guitar part is pyrotechnic. All throughout ChangesNowBowie it’s Bowie’s impeccable voice that hits you. On several tracks he even deigns to share his mic with Gail Ann Dorsey, a resident in Bowie’s band since his 1995 tour… This release is another wonderful testimony to add to the expansive discography of a constantly-evolving genius. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Liveandwell.com

David Bowie

Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

Originally issued in 1999 as a subscription-only release via Bowie's BowieNet website, this live album brings together tracks recorded on his 1997 Earthling Tour. The set includes songs performed in Amsterdam, Rio de Janeiro, New York, and at the Phoenix Festival in the U.K., with tracks coming from his Earthling and 1. Outside albums of the time. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Script for a Jester's Tear

Marillion

Progressive Rock - Released April 3, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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At the time, Marillion's remarkable, full-fledged 1983 debut Script for a Jester's Tear was considered an odd bird: replete with Peter Gabriel face paint and lengthy, technical compositions, Marillion ushered in a new generation of prog rock that bound them forever to the heroics of early day Genesis. Intricate, complex, and theatrical almost to a fault, Script for a Jester's Tear remains the band's best and sets the bar for their later work. Filled with extraordinary songs that remained staples in the band's live gigs, the album begins with the poignant title track, on which Fish leads his band of merry men on a brokenhearted tour de force that culminates with the singer decrying that "…the game is over." "He Knows You Know,," a song sprinkled with drug paranoia and guilt; as the song veers to its chorus, Fish announces, "Fast feed, crystal fever, swarming through a fractured mind." If "The Web" hints at a grain of commercialism, "Garden Party" is a joyous anthem that showcases Marillion at the peak of its powers. Bogged down by some hilariously over-the-top British poetry, "Chelsea Monday" may be one of the album's lesser moments (if there are any), but the magical "Forgotten Sons" concludes the opus magnificently. Luckily for Marillion fans, EMI released a remastered version of Script with two different versions of "Market Square Heroes," "Three Boats Down from the Candy," "Grendel," "Chelsea Monday," the demo of "He Knows You Know," and an alternate track titled "Charting the Single." A vital piece for any Marillion head and an essential work for any self-respecting first- or second-generation prog rock fan. © John Franck /TiVo
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Chelsea Monday

Marillion

Progressive Rock - Released March 13, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Garden Party

Marillion

Progressive Rock - Released February 21, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

Is It Any Wonder?

David Bowie

Rock - Released February 14, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Is It Any Wonder? collects together rare and unreleased material from David Bowie's back catalog of work. Included is the sought-after Brian Eno "live" mix of "The Man Who Sold the World," alongside other tracks released or recorded during the '90s. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Evolution

The Hollies

Rock - Released August 26, 2016 | Rhino - Parlophone

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For many Hollies enthusiasts, Evolution (1967) is considered the band's most accessible blend of pop and psychedelia. The quintet were headed into musical territories beyond simply "moon-June-bloom" and boy-meets-girl lyrics coupled with the tightly constructed vocal harmonies that had become their calling card. Nowhere is this more evident than in the tripped-out cover art from Dutch multimedia artists Seemon Kooer, Marijke Kooer, Josje Leeger, and Barry Finch -- known collectively as Fool. Although "Carrie-Anne" could be considered an extension of the trite, somewhat predictable Brit pop, there are clear indications of new horizons on cuts such as the modish "You Need Love," the arguably passé distorted electric guitar on "Have You Ever Loved Somebody," and the wailing fretwork on the driving freakbeat rocker "Then the Heartaches Begin." Graham Nash (guitar/vocals), Allan Clarke (guitar/vocals), Tony Hicks (guitar/banjo/dulcimer/vocals), Bobby Elliott (drums), and new recruit Bernie Calvert (bass/vocals) -- who replaced original member Eric Haydock in the spring of 1966 -- were also taking different approaches in their writing and arranging, as heard on the trippy "Heading for a Fall." On this tune, most prominent is the unusual six-eight time signature, coupled with Hicks' inversion of the unmistakable banjo, which is similar to the sound he conjured up on the hit "Stop, Stop, Stop." However, somewhat more atypical of the Nash-era band are the light and limber acoustic and uptempo "Stop Right There," or the baroque "Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Evolution

The Hollies

Rock - Released August 26, 2016 | Rhino - Parlophone

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For many Hollies enthusiasts, Evolution (1967) is considered the band's most accessible blend of pop and psychedelia. The quintet were headed into musical territories beyond simply "moon-June-bloom" and boy-meets-girl lyrics coupled with the tightly constructed vocal harmonies that had become their calling card. Nowhere is this more evident than in the tripped-out cover art from Dutch multimedia artists Seemon Kooer, Marijke Kooer, Josje Leeger, and Barry Finch -- known collectively as Fool. Although "Carrie-Anne" could be considered an extension of the trite, somewhat predictable Brit pop, there are clear indications of new horizons on cuts such as the modish "You Need Love," the arguably passé distorted electric guitar on "Have You Ever Loved Somebody," and the wailing fretwork on the driving freakbeat rocker "Then the Heartaches Begin." Graham Nash (guitar/vocals), Allan Clarke (guitar/vocals), Tony Hicks (guitar/banjo/dulcimer/vocals), Bobby Elliott (drums), and new recruit Bernie Calvert (bass/vocals) -- who replaced original member Eric Haydock in the spring of 1966 -- were also taking different approaches in their writing and arranging, as heard on the trippy "Heading for a Fall." On this tune, most prominent is the unusual six-eight time signature, coupled with Hicks' inversion of the unmistakable banjo, which is similar to the sound he conjured up on the hit "Stop, Stop, Stop." However, somewhat more atypical of the Nash-era band are the light and limber acoustic and uptempo "Stop Right There," or the baroque "Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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BBC Archives

Iron Maiden

Hard Rock - Released November 18, 2002 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Best Of The B-Sides

Iron Maiden

Hard Rock - Released November 18, 2002 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Beast Over Hammersmith

Iron Maiden

Hard Rock - Released November 4, 2002 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Very: Further Listening: 1992 - 1994

Pet Shop Boys

Pop - Released June 4, 2001 | Rhino - Parlophone

Because they work in a field that isn't usually taken seriously, the Pet Shop Boys are often ignored in the rock world. But make no mistake -- they are one of the most talented pop outfits working today, witty and melodic with a fine sense of flair. Very is one of their very best records, expertly weaving between the tongue-in-cheek humor of "I Wouldn't Normally Do This Kind of Thing," the quietly shocking "Can You Forgive Her?," and the bizarrely moving cover of the Village People's "Go West." Alternately happy and melancholy, Very is the Pet Shop Boys at their finest. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Behaviour: Further Listening 1990 - 1991

Pet Shop Boys

Pop - Released October 1, 1990 | Rhino - Parlophone

Behavior was a retreat from the deep dance textures of Introspective, as it picked up on the carefully constructed pop of Actually. In fact, Behavior functions as the Pet Shop Boys' bid for mainstream credibility, as much of the album relies more on popcraft than rhythmic variations. Although its a subtle maneuver, it would have been rather disastrous if the results weren't so captivating. Tennant takes this approach seriously, singing the lyrics instead of speaking them. That doesn't necessarily give the album added emotional baggage -- all of the distance and detachment in the duo's music is not a hindrance, it's part of the concept -- but it does result in an ambitious and breathtaking pop album, which manages to include everything from the spiteful "How Can You Expect to Be Taken Seriously?" to the wistful "Being Boring." © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo