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New Age - To be released December 3, 2021 | Wergo

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Classical - Released November 26, 2021 | Wergo

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Classical - Released November 26, 2021 | Wergo

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On his portrait recording Matthias Krüger searches for truth and identity. In his works, musical and non-musical elements and quotations fuse into a steady stream. This results in a seemingly never ending musical network of associations. The composer refers likewise to classical music, old philosophy and pop culture. According to booklet author Bastian Zimmermann: „In Krüger’s music, nothing is safe from becoming the beginning or the end of a musical idea”. The ensemble piece le vide à perdre incorporates impressions from a night at a club in Istanbul – a liberation of oneself in ecstasy, played with great commitment by the Ensemble Ascolta conducted by Nicholas Kok. Wie ein Stück Fett (Redux), a piece written for the Ensemble BRuCH, deals with excerpts from Gustav Meyrink’s novel The Golem using rough humor. The orchestra piece Bellygoat Boom (substrate), commissioned by West German Radio (WDR) and conducted by Elena Schwarz, was influenced by cultural and artistic practices of the Maori that Krüger experienced in New Zealand. The audio version of sweep over me them dusty bristles played by the Ensemble Inverspace is available online exclusively. Additionally, the specific video choreographed by Eddie Martinez and produced by Rikisaburo Sato is at disposal on the vimeo channel of Edition Zeitgenössische Musik. It toys with retro aesthetics that mirror the electro swing appeal of the music. Distinctively, Krüger weaves fundamental questions of humankind and human striving into it. © Wergo
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Classical - Released October 1, 2021 | Wergo

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Classical - Released October 1, 2021 | Wergo

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Chamber Music - Released August 20, 2021 | Wergo

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The year 2021 has been a good one for the piano-and-percussion quartet Yarn/Wire, as the group released an album of recent music by the durable avant-garde experimenter Annea Lockwood, and now music by composers Enno Poppe and Wolfgang Heiniger, contributing one work each and one joint piece. The latter gives the album its title, and it offers a place to start with the music, which defines an intriguing intermediate space between acoustic and electronic music. The players of Yarn/Wire are oriented toward acoustic instruments, but they often interact with and manipulate the products of electronic sound sources. In Tonband, the group's two pianists alter sounds coming from the percussionists, captured by microphones. Framing this piece are an acoustic work, Poppe's two-movement Feld, which might as well be electronic, and a mostly electronic one, Heiniger's Neumond, where the pianists play MIDI keyboards. For listeners outside the avant-garde sphere, the music may have a rather forbidding exterior, but this album may be an ideal way into the surfaces and the issues of contemporary electronic-acoustic music. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released August 6, 2021 | Wergo

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Classical - Released April 23, 2021 | Wergo

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | Wergo

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Chamber Music - Released March 19, 2021 | Wergo

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Chamber Music - Released November 20, 2020 | Wergo

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Classical - Released November 6, 2020 | Wergo

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Chamber Music - Released November 6, 2020 | Wergo

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Wergo

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Chamber Music - Released September 4, 2020 | Wergo

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On her portrait recording “earthing” the Berlin-based composer Clara Iannotta concentrates on the genre string quartet. Therefor she takes inspiration mostly from the idea of an underwater world and the small animals that let their luminous organs glow in the deep. The resulting music seems to be under the pressure of water masses but happens in an environment of expanded time. At the beginning of her journey into unknown depths Iannotta works with minimalistic and fragile sounds: ‘They sharpen your sense of hearing, just as eyes can only slowly become accustomed to darkness’. Though at times her music can mount up to enormous and complex structures. Iannotta finds further inspiration for her quartets in the works of Irish lyric poet Dorothy Molloy and US-American writer David Foster Wallace or in J.S. Bach’s “Partita no. 1 in B minor”. Furthermore, phenomena of the wildlife have an impact on her compositional concepts as she explains to booklet author Theresa Beyer concerning the piece “Earthing – dead wasps (obituary)”: ‘A spider leaves its carapace behind as an empty shell when it’s growing. And suddenly two bodies are lying there – one empty, one filled – and thus two different temporalities. You might say that I composed a string quartet that sheds its skin several times during the performance.’ Sound and noise are represented equally in Clara Iannottas music. Partially, she prepares the strings of the instruments with paper-clips or tunes them down radically. Subtle electronic sounds can be found as well as counter bells, bird whistles, and styrofoam blocks. During the seven years in which the four string quartets have been written, Iannotta gradually leans towards the noise – a process of “earthing”, towards the substance of sounds. © Wergo
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Classical - Released August 7, 2020 | Wergo

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Classical - Released July 24, 2020 | Wergo

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Classical - Released July 10, 2020 | Wergo

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Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Wergo

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