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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 20, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 20, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 20, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 20, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 24, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 25, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

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This first studio album from Boogie truly is engulfed in darkness, sadness and pessimism. The record is heavily focused on introspection, exhaustion and general negativity as some of the track titles may suggest. Released on Eminem’s record label, Shady Records, the album consists of 13 tracks and includes appearances from Eminem himself (Rainy Days), JID (Soho), 6LACK (Skydive II), Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah (Whose Fault) and Snoh Aalegra (Time). The Compton rapper sets the tone instantly with the opening track Tired/Reflections which is focused on deep introspection, insecurity and being at war with one’s self. The rapper continues in this vein with Silent Ride on which he states “I can’t lie, I’m detached, I need guidance” as he battles with the voice inside his head which is keeping him closed off. Despite all the doom and gloom this is far from a bad album. Boogie displays nice vocal skill (Skydive includes a nice mix of vocals with acoustic guitar backing) and a flow that fits very nicely with the often downbeat and melancholy production. His commitment to the atmosphere of eternal sadness makes the album feel very genuine. For large portions of the record he focuses on a dysfunctional relationship which seems to be falling apart, something that is most clear on tracks such as Whose Fault and Time. Boogie maintains the Compton gangsta attitude but somehow manages to coat it in gloom as he states “got too many b****es in my bed” (something that is often a brag for today’s rappers) and “I been thuggin’ through my rainy days” on Silent Ride and Rainy Days respectively. All in all, a solid first attempt. © Euan Decourt/Qobuz

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 25, 2019 | UMGRI Interscope

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This first studio album from Boogie truly is engulfed in darkness, sadness and pessimism. The record is heavily focused on introspection, exhaustion and general negativity as some of the track titles may suggest. Released on Eminem’s record label, Shady Records, the album consists of 13 tracks and includes appearances from Eminem himself (Rainy Days), JID (Soho), 6LACK (Skydive II), Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah (Whose Fault) and Snoh Aalegra (Time). The Compton rapper sets the tone instantly with the opening track Tired/Reflections which is focused on deep introspection, insecurity and being at war with one’s self. The rapper continues in this vein with Silent Ride on which he states “I can’t lie, I’m detached, I need guidance” as he battles with the voice inside his head which is keeping him closed off. Despite all the doom and gloom this is far from a bad album. Boogie displays nice vocal skill (Skydive includes a nice mix of vocals with acoustic guitar backing) and a flow that fits very nicely with the often downbeat and melancholy production. His commitment to the atmosphere of eternal sadness makes the album feel very genuine. For large portions of the record he focuses on a dysfunctional relationship which seems to be falling apart, something that is most clear on tracks such as Whose Fault and Time. Boogie maintains the Compton gangsta attitude but somehow manages to coat it in gloom as he states “got too many b****es in my bed” (something that is often a brag for today’s rappers) and “I been thuggin’ through my rainy days” on Silent Ride and Rainy Days respectively. All in all, a solid first attempt. © Euan Decourt/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 2, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

New York rapper Jay Critch's charismatic flows and melodic approach gave his early singles a signature style that transcended the cookie-cutter trap fare of his time. Inventive lyricism and diverse rhyme styles found Critch either spitting jagged torrents or sing-rapping daydreamy Auto-Tuned melodies on one-off tracks that proved to be viral successes. With debut studio album Hood Favorite, Critch takes his various styles to new places, pushing the envelope on the pop aspects of his sound. Above average production helped solidify the sound of Critch's singles, and an ever-shifting backdrop of imaginative beats keeps Hood Favorite interesting, Critch switching his delivery as he interacts with the different instrumentals. Huge pop-rap constructions like "Way It Is" and the Offset-featuring "Quicker" highlight the melodic, almost wistful character of the album, while dark bangers like "Ego" offer Jay an avenue for his harder lyrical firestorms. Almost every track takes a slightly different path, with big-beat club tracks like "Brown Hair" sounding like an early-2010s radio production and segueing into the comparatively spare and eerie "Replace," where Critch lays out a druggy flow over a trap exoskeleton. The constant stylistic changes sometimes give Hood Favorite more of a mixtape feel, but the album is ultimately tied together by Critch's multifaceted lyrical performances. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 2, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

New York rapper Jay Critch's charismatic flows and melodic approach gave his early singles a signature style that transcended the cookie-cutter trap fare of his time. Inventive lyricism and diverse rhyme styles found Critch either spitting jagged torrents or sing-rapping daydreamy Auto-Tuned melodies on one-off tracks that proved to be viral successes. With debut studio album Hood Favorite, Critch takes his various styles to new places, pushing the envelope on the pop aspects of his sound. Above average production helped solidify the sound of Critch's singles, and an ever-shifting backdrop of imaginative beats keeps Hood Favorite interesting, Critch switching his delivery as he interacts with the different instrumentals. Huge pop-rap constructions like "Way It Is" and the Offset-featuring "Quicker" highlight the melodic, almost wistful character of the album, while dark bangers like "Ego" offer Jay an avenue for his harder lyrical firestorms. Almost every track takes a slightly different path, with big-beat club tracks like "Brown Hair" sounding like an early-2010s radio production and segueing into the comparatively spare and eerie "Replace," where Critch lays out a druggy flow over a trap exoskeleton. The constant stylistic changes sometimes give Hood Favorite more of a mixtape feel, but the album is ultimately tied together by Critch's multifaceted lyrical performances. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

Booklet
Nearly a decade after the release of their previous album, 2010's The Beginning, the Black Eyed Peas truly take it back to the start on their triumphant seventh set, Masters of the Sun, Vol. 1. A lot changed in their eight-year absence: Fergie left the group, reducing BEP to the original trio of will.i.am, apl.de.ap, and Taboo, while the former pair spent time on solo music and judging television singing competitions and the latter beat cancer. Throw in a turbulent period of American politics and social turmoil and the Peas finally had something to say beyond mindlessly repetitive, party-starting platitudes and odes to "My Humps." A return to their roots, Masters of the Sun reclaims their late-'90s boom-bap sound -- recruiting an iconic crew of New York MCs to really drive the point home -- on a satisfying (and surprising) set that is cohesive both in theme and sound. The acid jazz throwback production is strong, with a soulful downbeat vibe flowing throughout, while the three BEP rappers tackle topics such as race relations, gun violence, police brutality, and social media addiction ("RING THE ALARM" and "BIG LOVE"), with a touch of hip-hop boasting for good measure. They sound revitalized and refreshed like a post-millennial Digable Planets or Tribe, pushing these head-bobbing beats and dexterous lyrics like the 2000s never happened. Godzilla-stomp horns herald the time warp back to the Golden Era on "BACK 2 HIPHOP" with Nas, continuing with enough soul and jazz-sampled tracks to bring a tear to the eye of any self-professed old head. Later, Slick Rick drops in on "CONSTANT" -- via a "La Di Da Di" sample -- and the late Phife Dawg and his Tribe brother Ali Shaheed Muhammad join forces with De La Soul's Posdnuos on "ALL AROUND THE WORLD," a dizzying talent cypher that BEP bill as "A Tribe Called De La Pea." On these standouts, the sonic familiarity and focus on verbal skill is utterly refreshing, especially in the world of 2018 trap and mumble rap. Elsewhere, pop-leaning guests provide mainstream polish without distracting from the hip-hop focus. In an obvious callback, trip-hop chanteuse Esthero reprises her role from BEP's 2000 single "Weekends," appearing on the jazzy bossa nova "4EVER." Nicole Scherzinger -- originally approached for the position before it went to Fergie and also once considered as her replacement -- delivers sultry vocals and a "Tom's Diner" hook to "WINGS," while K-pop rapper CL contributes an aggressive verse that stands tall beside the Peas on "DOPENESS." Without the electro distractions of The E.N.D. and The Beginning, or the pop-rap jock jams of Elephunk and Monkey Business, the Black Eyed Peas remind listeners of the pure skill and talent preceding all their radio-dominating chart hits from the 2000s, bridging the proverbial gap back to a time when will.i.am, apl.de.ap, and Taboo simply spit over a great beat. Masters of the Sun, Vol. 1 is a welcome and gratifying return to form, a catalog highlight decades into their careers. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 31, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 31, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 31, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 31, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 16, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 16, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 16, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 16, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 9, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope