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Jazz - Released June 11, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released June 4, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released May 28, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Electronic - Released May 21, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released May 14, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released May 7, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released April 30, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released April 23, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released April 16, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released April 2, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released March 26, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released March 12, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released March 5, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Electronic - Released February 19, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released January 29, 2021 | Sunnyside

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A vibrant big band production, Bud Powell in the 21st Century finds pianist Ethan Iverson in joyous celebration of the legendary bebop pianist with Italy's Umbria Jazz Orchestra. One of the prime architects of bebop and modern jazz, Powell lived a troubled life and his musical contributions are often overshadowed by the addiction, racial prejudice, and mental illness he suffered. A boundary-pushing artist in his own right, Iverson shines a light on Powell's music, reinterpreting many of the pianist's classic compositions, as well as drawing inspiration for his own inventive originals. Although best known for his work as a founding member of the genre-bending trio the Bad Plus, Iverson is also well-versed in the acoustic jazz tradition and has collaborated on projects with many of his idols, including Billy Hart, Ron Carter, and Albert "Tootie" Heath. Since parting ways with the Bad Plus in 2017, Iverson has continued to delve into his love of acoustic post-bop, recording albums with Mark Turner and Tom Harrell, all of which reinforces his reputation as an improviser with one ear in the past and one firmly attuned to jazz's future. It's just this sort of balance he strikes on Bud Powell in the 21st Century. Interestingly, although Iverson designed the album as a big band session, he drew his primary inspiration from Powell's classic 1949 small-group recordings featuring saxophonist Sonny Rollins, trumpeter Fats Navarro, bassist Tommy Potter, and drummer Roy Haynes. To help him achieve this sound, he put together his own adept quintet with trumpeter Ingrid Jensen, saxophonist Dayna Stephens, bassist Ben Street, and drummer Lewis Nash. Together, they bring their adventurous and progressive skills to bear throughout. At the top of the album is a two-part Iverson composition, "Bud Powell in the 21st Century 1: Chorale" and "Bud Powell in the 21st Century 2: Continuity." Harmonically lush arrangements, these songs, as with much of Iverson's work here, strike a balance between the acoustic modernism of artists like Dizzy Gillespie in the '40s and the more avant-garde approach of artists like Charlie Haden in the '70s. It's a bold combination and one that allows Iverson to mix lyrical harmonies with extended sections of probing, avant-garde vamp-style improvisations. What follows are equally vivid takes on such Powell standards as "Bouncing with Bud," "Dance of the Infidels," and "Wail," as well as a particularly burning rendition of Thelonious Monk's "52nd Street Theme." Particularly engaging is "Nobile Paradiso," a languid Iverson original that conjures the smoky, urbane jazz clubs of the 1940s in which Powell and his bebop contemporaries developed their sound. While it's almost taken for granted that Powell's music was key in the development of modern jazz, it still sounds as ear-poppingly fresh, especially when played with the passion and inspiration that Iverson does here. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 22, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Bassist Gui Duvignau was born in France and grew up in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. He attended the Berklee College of Music in Boston, moved to Portugal, then returned to Paris before coming to New York to get a master’s degree at NYU. Along the way, he recorded 2010's Porto in collaboration with singer and songwriter Sofia Ribeiro, and 2016's Fissura leading a French sextet. 3,5,8, his Sunnyside debut, features the bassist playing nine original compositions accompanied by a cast of New York-based musicians who include Argentine pianist Santiago Leibson, German guitarist Elias Meister, saxophonist Billy Drewes, and star session drummer Jeff Hirschfield. Opener "Volta" rumbles into existence with a cascading, circular set of chords from Leibson while Duvignau accents the changes on his folksy melody. Hirschfield doesn't keep time so much as dance with it, à la Paul Motian. His bandmates syncopate the melody, altering cadences and stress points but never resolving the harmony. Drewes and Meister make up the frontline on "Yerevan." With Leibson comping the changes, Duvignau's passionate playing bridges the lilting tonal articulation from the guitarist, saxophonist, and rhythm section. "Minas" is titled after the Brazilian state Minas Gerais, where Duvignau's hometown of Belo Horizonte is located. Meister's gently distorted guitar tones make an utterance before Duvignau punctuates his elongated phrasing. Leibson adds some sparse chords in the upper register as Hirschfield ticks his ride cymbal. Duvignau solos amid the droning exchange, piecing together an elliptical melody along the way. When Leibson begins to articulate it in modal pulses, Drewes, Meister, and Duvignau drive harder, adding heft and ballast that allow Hirschfield to bring it under the umbrella of swing; the group interplay here is striking. "Une Pensée Pour Paris" is a trio number that begins as a lilting, haunted ballad and evolves first into deep blues, then into impressionist post-bop before returning to whisper its source ballad to a conclusion. "Detuned for Drewes" is punchy bop for a pianoless trio, with Duvignau's bass twinning lines with the saxophonist as Hirschfield guides the knotty stop-and-start action with dominant swing. "Somewhat" is introduced by the bassist walking a slow blues amid crash cymbal accents from Hirschfield. Meister picks up on the blues walk with angular lines and distortion as Drewes tracks the ghost of the melody while fully engaging the drummer's shuffle. Halfway through, Meister erupts in a razor-wire solo that Duvignau appends by adding a deeper harmonic dimension -- without abandoning the groove. Drewes joins the pair, honking, sputtering, and moaning in a gritty swirl of blues and noir-ish swing. Ultimately, 3,5,8 is a wonderful showcase for Duvignau's writing; his compositions offer kaleidoscopic harmonic and rhythmic vocabularies that reflect many root sources, but he integrates them into a sound completely his own and balances them with his sidemen's many strengths. Though Duvignau is not yet a household name among American jazz fans, it's only a matter of time before he is. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 15, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released January 8, 2021 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released November 27, 2020 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released November 20, 2020 | Sunnyside

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