Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
CD$8.99

Johann Sebastian Bach : The Well-Tempered Clavier (Le Clavier bien tempéré)

Johann Sebastian Bach

Classical - Released March 24, 2014 | Satirino Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
From
CD$8.99

Heaven & Earth

Kenneth Weiss

Classical - Released June 19, 2013 | Satirino Records

The early history of the so-called Fitzwilliam Virginal Book is obscure. It was probably compiled in the 1610s, and it was not given the "Virginal Book" title until later; in all likelihood the music included was intended for a variety of keyboard instruments, or indeed could have been played on more than one instrument. That's the rationale for this release by American-born keyboardist Kenneth Weiss, who plays organ, harpsichord, a unique instrument known as the mother-and-child virginals (with a second virginal housed in a drawer of the larger instrument, and in a few pieces here played at the same time), and finally a claviorgan, which isn't much heard in recordings of English keyboard music but was a common home instrument from the 16th century to the 18th and may be worth the price of admission here all by itself. Weiss' intent seems to be to show the stylistic breadth of the collection, and once you get over the surprise of lurching from one instrument to another, which is something you wouldn't have heard in a concert of the period, he's actually successful. In addition to small dances, ornamented vocal pieces like the graceful anonymous Can shee excuse (track 9), and the wildly experimental music of John Bull, there are substantial works by a pair of composers generally not included in English Renaissance keyboard compilations: Thomas Morley and Thomas Tallis, whose concluding ten-minute Felix namque is a massive fantasy that demands quite a bit from the keyboardist. The preceding multisectional piece by Fernandino Richardson is also an unusual piece that shows a rare example of an English keyboard composer thinking in larger dimensions. This album is aimed largely at those familiar with this style, but it's lively and fresh for anyone. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Czardas Fantasy

Franz Liszt

Classical - Released June 5, 2013 | Satirino Records

From
CD$8.99

Dowland: Tunes of Sad Despaire

John Dowland

Classical - Released October 24, 2012 | Satirino Records

The songs of John Dowland are dominated by melancholia, a characteristic the composer consciously promoted, even in his personal motto, Semper Dowland, semper dolens. Sorrow is therefore the dominant tone of Dominique Visse's 2012 album, Tunes of Sad Despaire, which includes the source melody of the famous Lachrymae antiquae, Flow my teares, along with 16 other Dowland selections that show his fairly narrow range of moods and the stylistic affectation so dear to the Elizabethan era. Visse's somber countertenor and Fretwork's lute and viols accompaniment present the music with the appropriate heaviness of emotion, and Visse is joined by bass Renaud Delaigue in three of the songs, If my complaints, Flow my teares, and Come, heauy sleepe. The weight of the album's grief is only slightly alleviated by the instrumental Paduan, and the songs Fine Knacks for Ladies, and Away with these selfe louing lads, which lend some liveliness. However, listeners should be prepared for the gloominess of the disc, which can be a bit overwhelming if heard in one sitting. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

A Cleare Day - Pieces from the Fitzwilliam Virginial Book

Kenneth Weiss

Classical - Released March 23, 2012 | Satirino Records

The Fitzwilliam Virginal Book is a collection of about 300 keyboard works from either side of the year 1600. It is of unknown provenance (it was named for a later owner), but it is unparalleled as a source of Renaissance keyboard music from England and even beyond. There are various single-album sets of selections from the book on the market, but this live recording (minus crowd noise) by American-French keyboardist Kenneth Weiss stands out in several ways. First of all, Weiss uses three instruments, all copies of period pieces: an Italian virginal (a virginal is a sort of portable tabletop harpsichord with single horizontal strings for each note), a Flemish harpsichord, and an Italian harpsichord. This is reasonable, for the word "virginal" to Queen Elizabeth I, its most famous player, would have meant any keyboard instruments, and harpsichords of both types would have circulated in England at the time. The variation in timbre adds a lot to the album, with the resonant, thick sound of the Flemish harpsichord effectively set off against the brighter, clearer Italian instrument. Quarter-comma meantone tuning is used for all three instruments. The biggest attraction is the program, which combines famous works (Byrd's setting of Dowland's ubiquitous Pavana Lachrymae, track 2) with some that are very rarely recorded. In the latter group would be the opening title track, a programmatic fantasia encompassing no fewer than 12 changes in the weather. This both works well with other more or less representational pieces (a genre generally neglected in performances of music from this period) and helps create enough variety and drama to balance the major virtuoso showpiece, John Bull's Walsingham (track 14), a work that can stand with anything else from the Renaissance era. The program includes dances and variations as well as a few unclassifiable pieces like Giles Farnaby's Woody-Cock and the little Why aske you? (track 5), a delightful piece that combines aspects of ground bass, variation, and song. Weiss matches instrument to music effectively and ends up with a swashbuckling Walsingham. Strongly recommended for everyone from lovers of Renaissance keyboard music to those looking for a fine exploration of this basic Renaissance repertory item. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Bach: Goldberg Variations

Kenneth Weiss

Classical - Released April 15, 2009 | Satirino Records

From
CD$7.99

Beethoven: Piano Concertos Nos 1-5

Camerata Ireland

Concertos - Released November 15, 2007 | Satirino Records

From
CD$5.99

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3, Triple Concerto

Ludwig van Beethoven

Concertos - Released November 15, 2007 | Satirino Records

The wonderful but unusual combination of Beethoven's C minor Piano Concerto and his Triple Concerto for piano, violin, and cello proves entertaining in this 2008 release from Barry Douglas and the Camerata Ireland. Douglas, a world class virtuoso pianist who also directs from the keyboard, proves a noble soloist in the C minor Concerto, turning in an expansive opening Allegro con moto, a heartfelt central Largo and a hell-bent for leather closing Allegro. Joined by agile violinist Chee-Yun and aggressive cellist Andrès Diaz in the Triple Concerto, Douglas creates an effervescent opening Allegro, a singing central Largo, and a laughing, closing Rondo alla polacca. Appropriately, the performances are poised between the dramatic and the lyrical, with the soloists at the front of the stage and the orchestra providing a balance between support and assertion. Though some listeners may retain an affection for performances in which the roles of the soloist and the orchestra are more strongly contrasted, the more collaborative approach of Douglas and the Irish musicians is certainly well done. Recorded at Mahoney Hall in the Helix, Dublin, in 2007, Satirino's digital sound is a tad close but very direct. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Voyage

Ferenc Vizi

Classical - Released November 15, 2007 | Satirino Records

From
CD$7.99

Essercizi Per Gravicembalo

Kenneth Weiss

Classical - Released November 15, 2007 | Satirino Records

From
CD$5.99

Beethoven: Piano Concertos No. 1 & No. 5

Ludwig van Beethoven

Concertos - Released September 19, 2006 | Satirino Records

As a soloist, what better way to ensure that your accompanying orchestra possesses both the sound and interpretive skills that match your own playing than to found the orchestra yourself? That is precisely what pianist Barry Douglas has achieved with the Camerata Ireland, which he founded in 1999. Douglas, himself a medalist in both the Tchaikovsky and Cliburn International Piano Competitions, directs the ensemble from the piano in this recording of Beethoven's First and Fifth piano concertos. The orchestra's huge, powerful sound belies its small size. Balance during orchestral tuttis is quite satisfying with plenty of support from the low end of the orchestra. When accompanying the piano, the sound is very sensitive without ever seeming timid. Articulation is energetic and precise. All of these positive traits found in the orchestra are present in Douglas' playing, but even more so. His interpretation of these two great concertos is fresh and vigorous and is neither over romanticized nor stodgy and stiff. The second movement of the Emperor Concerto is breathtaking in its serenity and simplicity while not falling into the all-too-frequent trap of being too slow. The rondo movements of both concertos scintillate with playful exuberance. Truly, this synthesis of soloist and ensemble yield a highly satisfying musical experience well worth checking out. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Rachmaninov: Moments Musicaux

Serge Rachmaninoff

Classical - Released May 5, 2006 | Satirino Records

From
CD$8.99

Bach: Italian Concerto

Johann Sebastian Bach

Classical - Released April 7, 2006 | Satirino Records

Kenneth Weiss is an American-born harpsichordist who moved to Europe, studied with Gustav Leonhardt, and later worked with William Christie in his growing farm system of ensembles of young musicians. His style in these Bach works seems more influenced by Christie's than by Leonhardt's -- it is imposing, sometimes even lush, but also apparently conditioned by lots of research into the specifics of Baroque performance practice. Weiss pushes and pulls the tempo a good deal more than most of his contemporaries -- oddly, more so in the "Italian" Concerto for harpsichord, BWV 971, than in the suites of French dances included on the album. The delayed notes and suddenly racing passages seem at odds with the terraced, Vivaldian conception of the Italian Concerto, but there's a lot of power in Weiss' performance, and it's enhanced by the glittering resonance of the 1761 French harpsichord he plays -- a wonderful find, housed in a Parisian museum. The final Presto movement has a very infectious sense of forward motion, and Weiss' interpretation of the Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, BWV 903, a work annotator Gilles Cantagrel considers an anguished response to the death of Bach's first wife, is appropriately dramatic. Another positive feature of the album is the inclusion on the program of one of Bach's least-often-played keyboard works: his Sonata in A minor after the Sonata No. 1 in Jan Adam Reinken's "Hortus musicus," BWV 965. This is really a suite of dances rather than a sonata -- the terminology was fluid in 1685, when north German composer Reincken wrote this five-movement work for two violins, viola, and continuo. Bach's version for harpsichord is an early example of his inclination toward making arrangements of the works of other composers from whom he thought he had something to learn -- he seems to have reworked music by Vivaldi and other composers in the spirit of reverse engineering, taking pieces apart and putting them back together again with minor but significant modifications. Even without familiarity with the original work, the listener here will notice passages of characteristically Bach-like harmonic density that sound as though they were added in his arrangement. The booklet notes, especially for such a historically oriented performer as Weiss, could have been a bit more specific on this score, and the booklet itself is poorly designed, with a combination of tiny print and large amounts of white space, and a near-criminal use of dull green track titles on duller green background. The engineers of France's Satirino label, however, apparently set themselves the task of capturing all the colors of Weiss' unique harpsichord, and they succeeded nicely. Recommended for listeners who liked Glenn Gould's Italian Concerto but have come around to the harpsichord point of view on Bach. © TiVo
From
CD$5.99

Beethoven: Piano Concertos No. 2 & No. 4

Barry Douglas

Concertos - Released September 15, 2005 | Satirino Records

Founded by pianist Barry Douglas to celebrate, in words, "the wealth of Irish musical talent," the Camerata Ireland is a robust, raw-toned, big-hearted chamber orchestra. On its debut disc under Douglas, the Camerata is as adept at following Douglas' direction as Douglas is at directing from the keyboard. With a strong tone and a powerful attack, plus a propulsive sense of rhythm, the group faithfully accompanies Douglas in these small-scale but still grandly romantic interpretations of Beethoven's Second and Fourth piano concertos. A grandly romantic pianist himself, Douglas delivers hugely conceived and flamboyantly executed performances. Because all the musical direction is coming from Douglas, these are inevitably highly individualistic performances with distinctively inflected phrasing and shaped structures, performances that make Beethoven sound less like the post-Classical successor of Mozart than the early Romantic contemporary of Weber and Hummel. While these should not be the only performances of Beethoven's Second and Fourth piano concertos one hears, they are nevertheless interesting additions to the discography. Satrinio's recording made in Dublin in June 2005 puts the performance 15 feet in front of the listener in an empty medium-sized hall. It is altogether uncanny. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Rameau: Opera & Ballet Transcriptions

Jean-Philippe Rameau

Classical - Released November 21, 2003 | Satirino Records

From
CD$7.99

J. S. Bach: 6 Partitas

Kenneth Weiss

Classical - Released October 1, 1999 | Satirino Records