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Gospel - To be released July 2, 2021 | Profil

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Classical - To be released July 2, 2021 | Profil

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Classical - To be released July 2, 2021 | Profil

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Classical - Released May 21, 2021 | Profil

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Louis Kaufman was born on May 10, 1905 in Portland, Oregon. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Romania who were very interested in the arts and took their son to concerts. Kaufman gave his solo debut in the New York Town Hall in 1928 under the auspices of the International Naumburg Competition, which he proceeded to win. He then went on to play with such acclaimed musicians as Pablo Casals (cello), Mischa Elmann (violin), Jascha Heifetz (violin), Gregor Piatigorsky (cello) and Alfredo Rossi (piano). He also played classical music in ensembles, such as the Musical Art Quartet, the Kaufman Quartet, the Westwood String Quartet, the Bach Chamber Symphony Group. In 1932 Kaufman married the pianist Annette Leibole and performed frequently with her in public. In 1956 Louis Kaufman and his wife returned to Los Angeles. The violinist continued to give wonderful concerts until the late 1970s. After an eye operation he decided to retire from active performance. Louis Kaufman died on February 9, 1994. He was probably the violinist who had recorded the most works in the twentieth century. In addition to building up this huge body of recordings he was also the inventor of the Kaufman chinrest for the violin. The recordings featured on this historic box are predominantly from the 1940s and 50s. © Profil
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Classical - Released April 16, 2021 | Profil

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Classical - Released March 19, 2021 | Profil

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Hélène Boschi’s repertoire was broad-based, ranging from the Baroque (François Couperin, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Sebastian Bach) to contemporary music. Her favorite composers of the Viennese Classical era were undoubtedly Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Franz Schubert; strangely, it seems she left behind no Beethoven recordings. One notable fact about Boschi is that she was the first female pianist to record the works of Padre Antonio Soler (1729-1783), receiving the 1952 "Grand Prix du Disque" in honor of her achievement. As for the nineteenth century, her passionate readings of Schumann are of the utmost importance; but Carl Maria von Weber and Muzio Clementi also captured her attention, as did Frédéric Chopin and Emmanuel Chabrier and the Impressionists Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel. Modern classics were also integral to her repertoire – as were the works of her immediate contemporaries. Luigi Dallapiccola dedicated his 1952 piano composition Quaderno di Annalibera to Hélène Boschi, Claude Ballif paid her that honor with his Fourth Sonata, Op. 31. © Profil
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Classical - Released March 19, 2021 | Profil

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Pianist and music teacher Artur Balsam was born in Warsaw on February 8, 1906. He attended the Helena Kijenska-Dobkiewiczowa Conservatory (now Academy) of Music established at the beginning of the 20th century in the Polish city of Lodz. After that he went to the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin, where he continued his studies with Artur Schnabel. A mere 12 years elapsed between his concert debut in 1918 and his success at the 1930 Berlin International Piano Competition; shortly after winning that competition, he was awarded the Mendelssohn Prize for chamber music in 1931 in Munich. Balsam matured into a sought-after partner at the piano: having won the Mendelssohn Prize together with the violinist Roman Totenberg, he toured the USA the following year with the brilliant young Yehudi Menuhin. After the rise to absolute power in Germany of Adolf Hitler at the head of his Nazi party, Balsam emigrated to the United States. He settled in New York in 1940, made a name for himself on the American chamber music scene and was the favorite accompanist of many famous soloists, especially in the years from 1940 to the early Seventies of the last century. He frequently partnered the great violinists Nathan Milstein and David Oistrakh, also playing for Joseph (violin) and Lillian (viola) Fuchs, Leonid Kogan (violin), Zino Francescatti (violin), Pierre Fournier (cello) and Mstislav Rostropovich (cello). Balsam was the pianist of the NBC Symphony Orchestra under Arturo Toscanini for five years. He was also a piano soloist for other leading orchestras. © Profil
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Classical - Released March 19, 2021 | Profil

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The present compilation illustrates Louis Kentner as a successful soloist, chamber musician and concert pianist. A highly gifted musically, Kentner studied from 1911 to 1922 at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest, attracting early attention in 1916 with a concert performance of Chopin. At the Music Academy, he studied piano with Arnold Székely, chamber music with Leó Weiner and composition with Hans Koessler and Zoltán Kodály. He made his official debut at the age of 15 (1920) and began concert tours of European cities, attracting particular attention for his interpretations of Chopin and Liszt. He won the Liszt Prize in Budapest and the Chopin Prize in Warsaw. In 1933, Kentner gave the first Hungarian performance of Béla Bartók’s Second Piano Concerto (conducted by Otto Klemperer); in London in 1946, the first performance in Europe of the composer’s Third Piano Concerto under Sir Adrian Boult. Bartók’s artistic oeuvre found a special place in Kentner’s heart. © Profil
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Classical - Released March 19, 2021 | Profil

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“The reason for this transcription was simply that – once again – I had been busy with the Ninth, this time with the intention of arriving at the essence of the work: I wanted to understand Bruckner even better, come to grips with the architecture of his symphonic thought. And that led automatically to the idea of making an arrangement for a keyboard instrument, because when you tackle that, you are practically compelled to limit yourself to the essence of a work. And: The organ is Bruckner’s instrument, which stayed with him all his life. Even as a boy, Bruckner was fascinated by his father’s organ playing. Later, during his teacher training, he played the organ himself in small rural churches. After his return to the Augustine abbey of St. Florian he became its organist, then cathedral organist in Linz and finally the Emperor’s organist at the Hofburgkapelle in Vienna — of which he was very proud. The organ kept Bruckner company, then, right up to his death” (Gerd Schaller) Hailed as one of the most significant Bruckner exponents of our time, Gerd Schaller is a freelance conductor in constant demand from leading ensembles, concert halls and opera houses at home and abroad as guest conductor. Along the way, in 2008, he founded Philharmonie Festiva, a symphony orchestra with which he pursues his own ambitious projects. For many years now, Schaller’s activities have centered on the music of Anton Bruckner, by whose combination of deep emotion and extreme complexity the conductor has been fascinated since he was a boy. This fascination has resulted in his large-scale project "Bruckner2024", in which he aims to record all Bruckner’s significant works to album from his personal perspective by the composer’s bicentenary in 2024. © Profil
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Classical - Released January 15, 2021 | Profil

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Opera - Released January 15, 2021 | Profil

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Classical - Released December 4, 2020 | Profil

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Classical - Released November 20, 2020 | Profil

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
To say that Christian Thielemann's early March 2020 Gurre-Lieder at the Semperoper Dresden didn't take place a moment too soon is something of an understatement, when less than a fortnight later Europe's international-level live music making scene had been reduced to solo recitals self-filmed on mobile phones and posted onto social media. Equally fortuitously, it was recorded live, meaning we can now all listen to this ambitious project with its international line-up that would, had 2020 turned out differently, have received a second airing the following month at the Salzburg Easter Festival. Broad brushstrokes first, and in orchestral terms there's a wonderful transparency to the sound from the Staatskapelle Dresden bolstered by members of the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra. As for tone colour, think silvery luminosity from the upper strings and woodwind, balanced by warm, rounded richness from the brass and lower strings - it's both luxuriously warm and sharply defined, making for a heavenly Prelude and Zwischenspiel, and full-throttle drama for the conclusion of Part 2. As for the chorus, there's some thrilling singing from the MDR-Rundfunkchor and Staatsopernchor Dresden, and while “Seht die Sonne” would possibly have packed even more of a punch when heard in the hall (they are perhaps slightly further back in the sound than a studio recording might have given us), “Gegrüßt, o König, an Gurre-Seestrand!” is unequivocally edge-of-the-seat stuff. Thielemann's overall architecture is also eminently satisfying, including a notably seamless-feeling transition over the stylistic shift between parts two and three. On to the soloists, and Camilla Nylund's Tove is warm and supple, losing not an iota of its mellow roundedness as she soars up high, with the climax of her “Du sendest mir einen Liebesblick” truly tingle-inducing. Dark-toned Stephen Gould as Waldemar is ardent in love, and especially compelling in despair, always in control of his own high-register leaps. Christa Mayer's Woodtaube is rich-voiced and passionate, and Kwangchul Youn's Bauer ringing and energetic. Wolfgang Ablinger-Sperrhacke makes for a colourful and enjoyably semi- raucous Klaus-Narr; and while Franz Grundheber may no longer be in his baritone prime, his voice is deliciously expressive and multicoloured in his sprechstimme Speaker role, and with a flexibility and strength thoroughly belying his eighty-plus years. If this cast ever gets reunited post-Covid then you should beg, borrow or steal a ticket. In the meantime, crank up the volume on this, and revel in it. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Profil

The piano music expert and music commentator Attila Csampai recently marveled at the “lasting impression of Gilels’s implacable precision, the energetic clarity and purity of his musical logic, the profound, unshakeable humanity of his messages and a totally unglamorous objectivity”. This new release showcases Russian repertoire, performed by Emil Gilels, with recordings made between 1940-1963. Widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of all time, Emil Gilels led the way to the West for his generation of Soviet pianists. His American concert debut in 1955 was renowned across the country. With a repertoire ranging from Baroque to twentieth century works, he is universally admired for his superb technical control and burnished tone on recordings. © Profil
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Classical - Released September 18, 2020 | Profil

Hi-Res Booklet
What strikes the listener on this debut release by Brandon Patrick George, until now known as a flutist of the Imani Winds chamber ensemble, is the chances he takes. Until the final Flute Sonata, Op. 94, of Prokofiev, George plays perilously virtuosic works, with every detail of his playing exposed by hyper-clear sound from the Profil label. George chooses an intelligent program that begins with the Flute Partita in A minor, BWV 1013, on par with the solo violin and cello sonatas among the purest technical showpieces Bach ever composed. George's crisp, sharp-edged performance is masterly. The pieces by Pierre Boulez and Kalevi Aho not only extend the virtuoso challenges but tie into the implied Baroque counterpoint of Bach's Partita. Only with the Prokofiev Flute Sonata, a joyous work ironically composed during the depths of World War II, does the music relax, and George with it. It's an exceptionally well-structured program, flawlessly executed. Recorded outside New York City in 2017 and 2018, they make one hungry to hear what George has achieved over the years since. © TiVo
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Opera - Released September 18, 2020 | Profil

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Classical - Released August 21, 2020 | Profil

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Dixieland - Released August 14, 2020 | Profil

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Classical - Released July 24, 2020 | Profil

With its generic title - "Romanze" - this superb album is likely to go unnoticed, which would be a great pity considering the quality of the works presented and their performers. Israeli opera singer Chen Reiss has chosen a programme of works for soprano and clarinet which she shares with Andy Miles, a versatile German clarinetist who, as well as being a competent soloist with the WDR Orchestra in Cologne, is a composer of film music and author of the highly successful Symphonic Jazz Rhapsody. Seemingly heterogeneous in appearance, the programme reveals rare gems, beginning with the Overture taken from the stage music for Sophocles' Oedipus King by Franz Lachner, a close friend of Schubert's who was also in contact with the fierce Beethoven. The expressive weight and seriousness of this Overture immediately outlines the drama to come. From the announcement of the joyful spring of Mozart's Schon lachet der holde Frühling to the arrival of Schubert's last spring sung by The Shepherd on the Rock (Der Hirt auf dem Felsen) in an arrangement for orchestra, this album features rare works by Ludwig Spohr and Schubert, including the sublime Romance from his forgotten Die Verschworenen singspiel ("The Conjured Ones"). The supple, sensual and charming voice of Chen Reiss does perfect justice to the delicate poetry of this early German Romanticism. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released July 24, 2020 | Profil

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