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Alternative & Indie - Released April 2, 2021 | Parlophone UK

The long-awaited debut album from Scottish indie outfit the Snuts, W.L. arrived in 2021 on the back of singles "Juan Belmonte," "Always," and "Elephants." Described by lead vocalist Jack Cochrane as a "collection of milestones and melodies that time stamp a dream," the project comprises 13 tracks including unreleased fan favorite "Glasgow" and "Coffee & Cigarettes," the latter a highlight of one of the band's 2020 EPs. © David Crone /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 2, 2021 | Parlophone UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 26, 2021 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 12, 2021 | Parlophone UK

Look at the Moon! is the fourth installment of the Brilliant Life Adventures series and sees the release of David Bowie's live show at the 1997 Phoenix Festival. The album includes several songs from his back catalog as well as the previously unreleased cover of Laurie Anderson's "O Superman." © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 15, 2021 | Parlophone UK

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Like many of her peers, Ashnikko's career started on TikTok. The North Carolina artist's 2019 song "Stupid" blew up on the dance challenge platform and made her a main character in the emerging wave of pop-rappers with an affinity for metal aggression and pop-punk juvenility. Demidevil is her debut mixtape and the ten-song project is a bundle of gooey hooks, seductive taunts, and the sort of raunchy humor that's been passed down from every generation of teenagers, albeit coded in Gen-Z euphemisms and TikTok-era brashness. Ashnikko's cocktail of pop, rap, and rock is so well-mixed that it feels pointless to try and categorize her as either a rapper or a singer. Songs like "Daisy" and "Toxic" are bubblegum trap to a tee (pastel production, Laffy Taffy hooks, and steel-toed combativeness), "Drunk With My Friends" and the pornographic "Slumber Party" call back to the steaminess of mid-2000s club composers like Nelly Furtado and The Pussycat Dolls, and then "Cry" and "L8r Boi" respectively welcome tinges of nu-metal and sophomoric 2000s pop-punk into the fold. There's also a surprisingly moving breakup ballad ("Good While It Lasted") and a completely ridiculous Broadway number called "Clitoris! The Musical" that lives up to its title. The only thing binding this Frankenstein's monster is Ashnikko's uncanny versatility. She has an amazing voice that works well whether she's belting, rapping, cooing through auto-tune, crooning with an R&B suaveness, or bursting into a bratty cackle. The project boasts a well-placed Kelis sample on "Deal With It" and a competent verse from Princess Nokia on "Slumber Party," but the biggest name on here is Grimes and her ethereal presence feels completely unnecessary on the otherwise visceral "Cry". Yes, Ashnikko's flipping of Avril Lavigne's "Sk8er Boi" into a clattering pop-trap song about a wall-punching cad is cheesy as hell, and you probably don't have to hear the aforementioned musical number more than once. Nevertheless, Ashnikko's bird-flipping, crotch-grabbing, potty-mouthing antics will burrow into your ears and find that inner teenager, no matter how long it's been dormant. © Eli Enis/Qobuz
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Pop - Released December 18, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 4, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Don't Let the Devil Take Another Day sees Stereophonics frontman, Kelly Jones, reimagining a collection of classic Stereophonics and solo tracks, stripping them back to basics. Included are reworkings of "Local Boy In a Photograph," "Dakota," and "Maybe Tomorrow," alongside his take on Kris Kristofferson's "Help Me Make It Through the Night." © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 27, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Compiled from concert performances in both Detroit and Nashville, these recordings took place during a three-week break from Bowie's 1974 Diamond Dogs tour. There are premieres here for material from 1975's Young Americans, and Bowie is backed by the Mike Garson Band augmented by vocalists such Luther Vandross and Warren Peace. © TiVo
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Pop - Released November 27, 2020 | Parlophone UK

Compiled from concert performances in both Detroit and Nashville, these recordings took place during a three-week break from Bowie's 1974 Diamond Dogs tour. There are premieres here for material from 1975's Young Americans, and Bowie is backed by the Mike Garson Band augmented by vocalists such Luther Vandross and Warren Peace. © TiVo
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Rock - Released November 20, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 6, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 6, 2020 | Parlophone UK

The Man Who Sold the World is either seen as the end of Bowie's formative era or the genesis of his evolution as a truly unique artist. While 1971's Hunky Dory is widely regarded as the first "classic" album in Bowie's catalog, the years leading up to it were so incredibly busy and productive for the musician, with moments of occasional greatness ("Space Oddity") occuring within a much larger batch of quite ordinary material. Between 1968 and 1970, Bowie would try out various permutations of baroque, acoustic pop and gloomy, semi-psychedelic hard rock, and by the time he presented the Metrobolist album to his record label (which then proceeded to change the title to The Man Who Sold the World, much to his chagrin), he had run himself ragged on the treadmill of promotional appearances, concerts, and traditional press interviews. Bowie was frustrated with his management, his label, his producer, and his creative output, and was ready for a change. Hunky Dory was absolutely that change, but the roots of that growth could definitely be heard on The Man Who Sold the World. Leaning hard into his rockist tendencies, the album was dark and heavy and decidedly devoid of the glam bounce that elevated similarly electrified later albums. Nobody dug it and despite early attempts by Bowie to promote it, the album was a commercial flop in the US and UK. Many of those attempts—primarily radio performances—are collated on The Width of a Circle. Appropriately dubbed as "complementary" to the recently revised version of The Man Who Sold the World (reissued under its original Metrobolist title), The Width of a Circle feels like a bit of a stretch as a standalone piece, rather than as, say, an additional couple of discs included in some super deluxe edition. Along with the radio sessions (many of which have been previously released on Bowie at the Beeb and elsewhere), there are a few single cuts and other ephemera; the material here feels more like it's been excavated rather than curated. A largely acoustic Bowie radio concert presented with middling fidelity takes up the first half of the set, and while it's great to hear a little awkward banter between Bowie and John Peel alongside some unique performances of songs that rarely made concert setlists, the audio issues and tape dropouts can be quite distracting. Things pick up in the second half with a clutch of quirky (and slightly better sounding) songs recorded for a radio play. One of those songs—"Threepenny Pierrot"—is a rewritten version of "London Bye, Ta Ta," one of the best unreleased Bowie songs from this era. It shows up here in three studio versions and all of them sound great. Beyond those highlights, this is very much a completists-only sort of release, both due to the wobbly audio quality on some of the tracks as well as the material itself. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 6, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 6, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Two years after they returned to the scene with The Now Now, an album without any featuring artists, Gorillaz are going back to what they love doing best: collaborations. The singles were released sporadically throughout 2020 with a high-flying lineup. Damon Albarn released one song per month, with the whole thing making up Season 1 of Song Machine. The album opens with the brilliant and highly relevant track Strange Times featuring Robert Smith. Damon says that he worked with the singer from The Cure entirely over email. “What I gave Robert was something very vague. He completely and utterly made it what it is” he said. It’s a masterpiece that’s perfectly fitting for the pandemic. In the long guestlist we find Beck on The Valleys of the Pagans, Leee John on the soulful The Lost Chord and the sweet high notes of Imagination, Peter Hook and the young singer Georgia on the post-punk song Aries, Fatoumata Diawara on the hypnotic Désolée (where Albarn even sings in French) and the raunchy punk rap of Momentary Bliss with slowthaï. The more you listen to it the more you can appreciate its richness. That’s what makes the album so good: it brings together incongruent artists who take the songs in a whole range of different directions. You never know where you’re going next. The Gorillaz lead you through a whole array of styles, adding a common varnish to each layer. The Deluxe edition includes six new tracks including MLS with JPEGMafia and the excellent Opium by the Southern duo EarthGang who are signed to J Cole’s label Dreamville. This is an eclectic, profound and very large scale project that’s stamped with Albarn’s impeccable production. And we’ve even got Season 2 and a Netflix documentary to look forward to! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Two years after they returned to the scene with The Now Now, an album without any featuring artists, Gorillaz are going back to what they love doing best: collaborations. The singles were released sporadically throughout 2020 with a high-flying lineup. Damon Albarn released one song per month, with the whole thing making up Season 1 of Song Machine. The album opens with the brilliant and highly relevant track Strange Times featuring Robert Smith. Damon says that he worked with the singer from The Cure entirely over email. “What I gave Robert was something very vague. He completely and utterly made it what it is” he said. It’s a masterpiece that’s perfectly fitting for the pandemic. In the long guestlist we find Beck on The Valleys of the Pagans, Leee John on the soulful The Lost Chord and the sweet high notes of Imagination, Peter Hook and the young singer Georgia on the post-punk song Aries, Fatoumata Diawara on the hypnotic Désolée (where Albarn even sings in French) and the raunchy punk rap of Momentary Bliss with slowthaï. The more you listen to it the more you can appreciate its richness. That’s what makes the album so good: it brings together incongruent artists who take the songs in a whole range of different directions. You never knowing where you’re going next. The Gorillaz lead you through a whole array of styles, adding a common varnish to each layer. The Deluxe edition includes six new tracks including MLS with JPEGMafia and the excellent Opium by the Southern duo EarthGang who are signed to J Cole’s label Dreamville. This is an eclectic, profound and very large scale project that’s stamped with Albarn’s impeccable production. And we’ve even got Season 2 and a Netflix documentary to look forward to! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released September 18, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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"It’s towards the end of the record that Kotz’s potential as a producer really begins to shine." © TiVo
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Electronic - Released September 18, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Why Do We Shake in the Cold? Is the debut album from English electronic pop artist Elderbrook and follows a slew of singles and EPs including 2018's Old Friend. Featuring the previously released tracks "Numb" and "My House," the album sees Elderbrook deliver a collection of hook-laden and emotive electronic pop songs. © TiVo
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Rock - Released July 3, 2020 | Parlophone UK

Since his death on January 10th, 2016, David Bowie’s unreleased archives and essential live recordings have been rife. Recorded in the Starplex Theatre in Dallas on the 13th of October, 1995, during his Outside tour, Ouvrez Le Chien takes its title from the lyrics of All The Madmen from the album The Man Who Sold The World. In this concert, the Briton is surrounded by his faithful musicians of the time: Carlos Alomar on rhythm guitar, Reeves Gabrels on lead guitar, Gail Ann Dorsey on bass, Zachary Alford on drums, Peter Schwartz and Mike Garson on piano and synth. This was the Bowie era in which he didn’t hide his fascination for the Industrial scene led by groups such as Nine Inch Nails (who incidentally played support for these concerts). Such a fascination can indeed be heard on this record, especially in its garish guitar solos, stakhanovite rhythms and sweeping urban synths. This sound is applied to his then contemporary tracks (The Hearts Filthy Lesson, Outside, I Have Not Been to Oxford Town, I’m Deranged) as well as past hits (Andy Warhol, Breaking Glass, The Man Who Sold The World, Teenage Wildlife). There is an electric and rhythmic exuberance (the very full-on drumming can occasionally become tiresome) in this live recording that goes hand in hand with Bowie’s tendency for excess. An essential record for hardcore fans. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz 
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Pop - Released June 26, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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  • Hip-Hop Uncanny Versatility!
    Hip-Hop Uncanny Versatility! Like many of her peers, Ashnikko's career started on TikTok. The North Carolina artist's 2019 song "Stupid" blew up on the dance challenge platform and made her a main character in the emerging wav...
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