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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released November 15, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet
An organist at the Spanish court during the reign of Philip V, José de Nebra wrote successful operas and zarzuelas (Spanish operettas). He also gave the world some religious music, which is slowly emerging from obscurity. He wrote this Requiem in 1758, for the funeral of the Queen of Spain Doña Bárbara de Braganza, a remarkable harpsichord player who studied under Domenico Scarlatti, and to whom the latter's famous 555 sonatas were dedicated. Made in the memory of the conductor Jesús López Cobos with whom José Antonio Montaño worked closely, this world-first recording of the Requiem by José de Nebra was made following a concert that marked 250 years since the death of the composer, who is thought to be one of the most important of 18th Century Spain. José Antonio Montaño conducts three ensembles whose recordings are touchstones in Spain: La Madrileña, an ensemble of period instruments which he himself founded; the Victoria Choir, which specialise in Renaissance polyphony and the Schola Antiqua which focuses closely on Gregorian chant. José de Nebra's liturgical music has survived in manuscript forum in the archives of the Royal Chapel of Madrid and it has not yet been fully published, or indeed even catalogued. Some of it can also be found in the archives of Rome's Sistine Chapel, in Munich, in Montserrat and in the Cathedral at Valladolid. A great deal of musicological work remains to be done, in light of the sheer quantity of works to be used. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 20, 2020 | Pan Classics

Booklet
The 17th century was marked on the one hand by war, infirmity and devastation, but at the same time by great innovations in research and science. In music, which until then had been characterized by structure and order, new ideals such as virtuosity and emotionality developed and created an antipole to the problems of the time. The new view of "Beauty - Belezza" places Lina Tur Bonet at the centre of her very personal programme, which brings together what she considers to be the most beautiful and stirring violin works of the period, presented in her own virtuoso and highly emotional style of playing. © Pan Classics
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Chamber Music - Released March 6, 2020 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released June 21, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released May 22, 2020 | Pan Classics

Booklet
The autograph reference "Per la Sig.ra Geltruda" on the manuscript of Vivaldi's motet Clarae stellae, scintillate has long aroused the curiosity of researchers. By years of research around the Vivaldi expert Michael Talbot is now revealed who this "Signora Geltruda" is: Geltruda della Violetta was a girl from the Venetian orphanage La Pietà, where Vivaldi worked for over a decade. Geltruda probably had an exceptionally beautiful voice that quickly attracted the interest of important personalities. Vivaldi's motet dedicated to Geltrude was commissioned by the Marquis Bentivoglio of Ferrara, who was Geltrude's patron. The unusual voice of Geltruda is described as being particularly delicate and was probably especially effective in expressive and less virtuoso pieces. This style of writing is also found in other pieces by Vivaldi, most likely also written for Geltruda. The experienced contralto Alessandra Visentin is active at many of Europe's major opera houses and presents here with her first solo album a special jewel in terms of repertoire and interpretation. © Pan Classics
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Chamber Music - Released September 25, 2015 | Pan Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released October 18, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 2, 2014 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 9, 2009 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Despite the elite circle of friends and colleagues -- which included Corelli, Valentini, Scarlatti, Locatelli, and even Handel -- that surrounded Giovanni Mossi, his fame as a composer did not last much beyond his 1742 death. As a violinist himself, it was only natural that his first published set of works would be a set of six sonatas for violin with cello and harpsichord. The influence of Corelli on Mossi's works is clear, yet Mossi branched out from the more rigid movement structure used by Corelli and did more to explore neighboring tonal areas. Performing these six charming works is Baroque violinist Leila Schayegh joined by violinist Ilze Grudele and harpsichordist Jörg Halobek. Schayegh's tone is sweet and clear, her intonation is precise, and her dynamics do a nice job shaping the musical lines. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of her performance, as detailed in her liner notes, would be her choices regarding ornamentation, which are applied organically and brilliantly throughout the album. Recorded sound quality is pleasant, with a nice balance between the three instruments, and doesn't unduly favor the violin line. Despite all of these positive attributes, Schayegh's still feels a bit safe and minimally enthusiastic. Fans of music from this era will still find this an appealing addition to their collections. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released March 2, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released June 5, 2020 | Pan Classics

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Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released March 23, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Every single note of this astounding mass of the Holy Virgin from Ghiselin Danckerts (1510-1567) is from the hand of the composer. The remark is by no means trivial, because at the time a good part of the Gregorian repertoire was the subject of thousands of improvisations, unannotated by definition. Yet, Danckerts annotated them, with a luxury of details, so we know precisely what the choirs and the soloists were singing and what they were improvising on the Gregorian sections of his mass (the introit, the hallelujah,…), a great rarity then, all the more so that the composer doesn’t hesitate to reproduce a few singular dissonances coming from implacable melodic logics. He is incidentally known for a few writings in which he clarifies with exactitude the art and the way to sing the sharp notes and the flat notes, to unfold the melisma, etc. Naturally, the polyphonic acts themselves (Kyrie, Credo, etc.) are also the subject of an extravagant harmonic and melodic profusion. It is hard to believe that this music is almost already half a millennium old. Danckerts was accepted as a singer in the papal chapel in 1538 and only left in 1565, not exactly his own choosing since according to his firing letter, he was accused of not having a voice anymore, to indulge in the pleasures with women, to be insanely rich and to be too sick to continue. Well, he wasn’t completely abandoned by the Church since, despite being a vile sinner, he kept on receiving his salary until his death two years later. The magnificent ensemble Cantar Lontano recorded this wonder in the captivating acoustics of two Italian baroque churches, in Pesaro and Castelbellino, neither too resounding nor too dry. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 26, 2007 | Pan Classics

Marc-Antoine Charpentier's Catholic faith was infused with an Ignatian spirituality that inspired his conviction that liturgical music is not only an offering of worship to God, but a means of intensifying believers' religious experience, opening them to the deep significance of the texts being set. With this motivation, he employed all the resources at his disposal to draw listeners close to the experience of the biblical story being told, or to the feeling the liturgical text was intended to inspire. The result is music of intensely explicit emotional communicativeness, using extremes of expressiveness to move the listener. There is no clearer example of this than his oratorio, Le reniement de St. Pierre (The denial of St. Peter). Charpentier's music so vividly depicts the actions of the characters that a cursory knowledge of the story makes it possible to follow the unfolding events without needing to refer to the text. The concluding chorus is one of the most wrenching moments in Baroque music; even to modern sensibilities, its harmonic contortions depicting Peter's plummet into despair as he "went out and wept bitterly" remain astonishing. The other works collected here are similarly demonstrative expressions of Charpentier's skills in depicting emotional extremes. Ensemble William Byrd, conducted by Graham O'Reilly, performs with dazzling intensity. The performers clearly understand Charpentier's theological and musical intent, and while they sing and play with great tonal purity, they bring to the music an emotional rawness that's breathtaking. Pan's sound is exemplary -- clean, warm, and present. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 29, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 27, 2015 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 24, 2016 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason