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Classical - To be released January 1, 2021 | Ondine

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Classical - Released November 6, 2020 | Ondine

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Recorded in Riga’s huge Protestant cathedral in March 2020, this amazing album perfectly translates the generous slow tempo-inducing acoustics which go wonderfully with Anton Bruckner’s passionate Motets. His sacred works are less well-known than his symphonies (which are in fact an extension of the scared works) though they make up a large part of the Austrian composer and organist’s opuses. His spirituality is echoed by the religious music composed and celebrated today in Latvia and other Baltic countries. Leading the Latvian Radio Choir, Sigvards Kļava paints a timeless picture of Bruckner whose music seems to float in the air thanks to the voices’ perfect homogeneity. The Mass in D minor (without Gloria or Credo as was the tradition at the time) is set amidst a selection of motets. This “missa brevis” is the work of a young 19-year-old man who was largely influenced by Palestrina. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 6, 2020 | Ondine

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This new album release by the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra under Hannu Lintu presents a new contemporary voice within Finland’s contemporary music scene: Antti Auvinen. This album includes three recent orchestral works by the composer marked by highly pressurised and explosive rhythms and sounds. The premieres of Antti Auvinen’s (born 1974) Junker Twist (2015) and Himmel Punk (2016) in the mid-2010s electrified the scene of Finland’s contemporary music: music critics felt that a new major voice in the country’s music scene had been born. Auvinen’s works are often thematically connected to events in the surrounding society. Junker Twist deals with the topic of rising neo-Nazist ideologies, while Himmel Punk takes a stand against religious discrimination. The most extensive work of this album, Turbo Aria (2017/2018), is partially based on arias sung by Finnish sopranos a century ago. These ‘arias’ sung by Alma Fohström, Aino Ackté and Järnefelt and the sounds of the accompanying instruments are augmented by the crackles, pops, hisses and other mechanical noises made by the original discs. Yet the work also has a second underlying theme: the refugee crisis. Is this programme music? Perhaps – but it does not matter, because the music is equally impressive with the narrative or without it. In 2016, Auvinen was awarded with the Teosto award, one of the biggest music awards in the Nordic countries. © Ondine
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | Ondine

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Talivaldis Keninš (1919-2008) is a name that is not known to most classical listeners despite of his long international career as a composer. This album presents three orchestral works by one of Latvia’s greatest 20th century composers performed by the Latvian National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Andris Poga and Guntis Kuzma. Although born in Latvia, Keninš lived most of his life as an exile. He was educated in Paris, where he studied under Tony Aubin and Olivier Messiaen, and won several awards. Keninš emigrated to Canada in 1951 and became a respected pedagogue and a very influential figure in Canada’s music life. Alongside his pedagogic work he wrote a sizeable catalogue of works, including several symphonies and concertos. According to Keninš, chamber music was the highest form of art. His Concerto di camera No. 1 (1981) reveals his love for chamber music. The work contains hints of Bartók. The composer himself mentioned Mozart’s concertos as his model when writing the work. Concerto for Piano, Strings and Percussion (1990) was completed shortly after the composer’s first visit to Latvia since the 1940s. Latvia was struggling to regain its independence and the work has a particularly tense and tragic atmosphere. When the work was premiered in Canada, the composer drew attention to the events unfolding in his home country when describing the work. Keninš wrote his First Symphony in 1959. This expressive work represents well the element of Latvian folk music in the composer’s work fusing it together with contemporary elements. Upon its premiere, the work received several performances in Canada, including CBC radio broadcasts. © Ondine
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | Ondine

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New album by the award-winning Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir together with Tallinn Chamber Orchestra led by Risto Joost includes one of Tõnu Kõrvits’ (born 1969) most recent works, You Are Light and Morning (Sei la luce e il mattino). Kõrvits, one of the most prominent Estonian composers of our time, has created an impressive 60-minute piece for choir and orchestra based on the poetry of 20th century Italian writer Cesare Pavese. The work was premiered by the choir and the orchestra under the baton of Risto Joost in Tallinn in June 2019 and was hailed by many as one of Kõrvits’ greatest achievements. © Ondine
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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | Ondine

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Final volume of Paul Hindemith’s (1895–1963) youthful and fresh Kammermusik series from the 1920s includes Kammermusik Nos. 4–7 performed by Kronberg Academy Soloists and the Schleswig-Holstein Festival Orchestra under a true Hindemith specialist, Christoph Eschenbach, who has won a Grammy for a previous Hindemith album on Ondine. These four works by Hindemith can be considered as full-bodied concertos for violin, viola, viola d’amore and organ. These work feature four young talented soloists, Stephen Waarts, Timothy Ridout, Ziyu Shen and Christian Schmitt. Hindemith’s Kammermusik No. 4 (‘Violin Concerto’) is scored for a larger orchestra than its three predecessors and includes 24 instrumentalists. Kammermusik No. 5 (‘Viola Concerto’) the composer premiered himself by playing the solo part. In total, Hindemith performed this work for 85 times during the next 11 years! In a letter, Hindemith described the viola d’amore as “the most beautiful thing that you can imagine in sound”. The composer fell in love with the instrument and wrote his Kammermusik No. 6 with this instrument in mind. Hindemith’s final Kammermusik (No. 7) was written to a commission by the Southwest German Radio: the premiere of this Organ Concerto was transmitted live in 1928. The radio broadcast had a decisive role in the composer’s choice of instrumentation. © Ondine
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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | Ondine

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This new album by the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra and its chief conductor Hannu Lintu is dedicated to works by American composer Peter Lieberson (1946–2011). This album features award-winning bass-baritone Gerald Finley as soloist in Lieberson’s song cycle Songs of Love and Sorrow and Lieberson’s close friend Anssi Karttunen as soloist in The Six Realms, for cello and orchestra. Lieberson’s Songs of Love and Sorrow is a deeply personal work. Lieberson had received a commission in 2005 to write a work for his wife, mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson. This project was interrupted by Lorraine’s death and soon after also the composer was diagnosed with cancer. The news of being awarded the Grawemeyer Award for his earlier song cycle Neruda Songs (2005) encouraged the composer to write another cycle on Neruda’s poetry, Songs of Love and Sorrow. The work was premiered by Gerald Finley in 2010. The composer wrote in his program notes: “I suppose that my life story of the past three years is not dissimilar to many others. The basic truths of love and sorrow are, I think, experiences that all of us understand very well. To have one without the other is not likely, but certainly it is our capacity to love that makes this human life so poignant”. Buddhist religion had played a significant role in Lieberson’s life since the early 1970s. This also had an impact on Lieberson’s compositions. According to Lieberson, “When I started writing music again, my style had changed... There was less sense of struggle... the horizon expanded. It’s as if you had tunnel vision, and then you have panoramic vision. Studying Buddhism also affected my approach to composing [in that] I understand there’s a kind of journey that’s made”. Lieberson directed a Buddhist training center for years before devoting his time exclusively to composition since 1994. At the request of Yo-Yo Ma, Lieberson conceived a concerto for amplified cello and orchestra, entitled The Six Realms, that outlines a key Buddhist teaching: that differing states of mind and emotions color our view of the world and shape human experience. This philosophy is reflected in the piece’s formal structure; each of the concerto’s six continuous sections represents a different state of being. © Ondine
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Classical - Released August 7, 2020 | Ondine

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An album of Joseph Haydn’s (1732–1809) eight delightful early keyboard sonatas by Tuija Hakkila performed on two fortepianos. The current consensus is that there are about sixty surviving authentic Keyboard Sonatas by Haydn, while contemporary sources point to as many as 80. The earliest of these probably date from Haydn’s youth in the 1750s; the last one was completed in summer 1795. Some of the lost Sonatas are works that Haydn simply gave away as a young man, and they have never been heard of since. In mid-18th-century Vienna music was mainly distributed in the form of manuscript copies made by copyists. Haydn did not publish his first collection of six Sonatas until 1774. This was immediately reprinted elsewhere in Europe, and in London a version with violin accompaniment arranged by none other than Charles Burney was published. Of the Sonatas selected for this project, Haydn wrote all of these over a period of about 15 years before his 40th birthday. Hakkila has selected an Italian-style instrument for two Sonatas (E major and G minor), a copy of a Gottfried Silbermann fortepiano. J. S. Bach probably owned a Silbermann fortepiano. The hammer mechanism in the instrument resembles that of the early instruments of Italian instrument builders Bartolomeo Cristofori and Giovanni Ferrini. In six Sonatas (G major, A major, A-flat major, D major, E minor and C minor), Hakkila uses her own original 1790s instrument, a five-octave Viennese fortepiano similar to the ones built by Anton Walter. The maker of this instrument is unknown, but it is known that it was sold to Finland in the early 19th century by the "Bureau de Musique in Leipzig", a company owned by composer Franz Anton Hoffmeister, who was an acquaintance of Haydn’s. 1987 Tuija Hakkila holds a senior position in piano music at the Sibelius Academy and earned a Doctor of Music degree in 2005. She also taught at the Royal Danish Conservatory in Copenhagen from 2005 through 2008. In 2014 she was appointed Professor of Piano Music at the Sibelius Academy. Her repertoire ranges from Bach to contemporary music: She has developed her interest in period instrument performance, presenting classical and romantic programmes on period pianos. Hakkila’s solo discography includes the complete cycle of Mozart keyboard sonatas, a compilation of Jean Sibelius’ piano works, a recital of 20th century piano music and a world premiere recording of the early 19th century Finnish Lithander brothers’ music. A recording with Kaija Saariaho’s chamber music for trio ensembles came out in fall 2012. In addition to this, she has recorded Niccoló Castiglioni’s chamber music, Haydn flute trios and Byström sonatas for piano and violin. Her discography also includes Brahms’ violin sonatas, Gabriel Fauré’s cello works and all Beethoven’s works for cello and piano. © Ondine
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Classical - Released August 7, 2020 | Ondine

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This new album by Lapland Chamber Orchestra conducted by John Storgårds is dedicated to works by one of the most exciting Finnish composers of her generation, Outi Tarkiainen (b. 1985). This album, first of its kind with Tarkiainen’s orchestral works, includes two works with mezzo-soprano Virpi Räisänen and saxophonist Jukka Perko as soloists. Tarkiainen has written several works that are strongly connected to the Northern landscape of Lapland and the culture of its Sámi habitants. The song cycle The Earth, Spring’s Daughter is based on texts by Sámi writers and also her saxophone concerto Saivo, is based on Sámi mythology. Mezzo-soprano Virpi Räisänen premiered Tarkiainen’s song cycle The Earth, Spring’s Daughter in 2016 together with Lapland Chamber Orchestra and John Storgårds. Tarkiainen’s saxophone concerto Saivo is dedicated to saxophonist Jukka Perko. © Ondine
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Classical - Released June 5, 2020 | Ondine

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How intriguing! American conductor Robert Treviño has dedicated his debut release with Ondine to Beethoven’s symphony cycle. This is the first time the Finnish label has visited these landmarks of Western symphonic culture with a traditional Scandinavian orchestra, namely the Malmö Symphony Orchestra, which will celebrate its centenary in 2025. With a rather faded palette of sound-colour and a smooth legato, this is undoubtedly a traditional version of the nine symphonies that transports us back to an era of discographies from Herbert von Karajan and Otto Klemperer. But by no means does it belong in the past…Treviño has worked closely with the likes of Leif Segerstam, David Zinman and Michael Tilson Thomas, the two latter conductors having, incidentally, made many interventions of their own in the Beethovenian symphonies as each attempted to produce worthy reinterpretations. Tilson Thomas drastically reduced the number of musicians in his complete cycle for CBS, whilst David Zinman based his work on Jonathan Del Mar’s Barenreiter edition which restored many of the lost accents and phrases that had been altered from one hundred and fifty years of, at times, rather unscrupulous interpretations. Here, Robert Treviño’s interpretations are lyrical and rich, precise as regards polyphony and mindful of the need to find a balance rather than overstress the text. Treviño ensures that each section finds its proper place and doesn’t get lost in the overall composition, creating dialogues with a chamber-like aesthetic. The unusual “concertato” at the beginning of the last movement of Eroica is the prime example of this. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released May 1, 2020 | Ondine

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This album presents a sequel for the album of Tchaikovskys sacred choral works by the Latvian Radio Choir and conductor Sigvards Kava. These two albums together form the composer's complete sacred works for the choir. The All-Night Vigil, Op. 52 for mixed choir, also known as the "Vesper Service", was written between May 1881 and March 1882. It was first performed by the Chudovsky Chorus conducted by Pyotr Sakharov in Moscow at the concert hall of the All-Russian Industrial and Art Exhibition on 27 June 1882. Tchaikovsky described the work as "An essay in harmonisation of liturgical chants". For this work the composer carefully studied the tradition of musical practice in the Russian Orthodox Church, which could vary considerably from one region to another. This beautiful, yet rarely recorded work is accompanied by four other choral works all written during the same decade: Hymn in Honour of Saints Cyril and Methodius as part of commemorations of the 1000th anniversary of the death of Saint Methodius, A Legend, originally coming from the collection "Sixteen Songs for Children", Jurists Song, for the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Imperial School of Jurisprudence in St Petersburg, and The Angel Cried Out, a beautiful traditional Russian Orthodox Easter hymn and Tchaikovskys final choral work. © Ondine
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Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Ondine

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This new album by the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra and conductor Hannu Lintu includes two of Magnus Lindberg’s (born 1958) recent compositions featuring soprano Anu Komsi as soloist in Accused. Magnus Lindberg is among the leading figures in today’s contemporary music and the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra enjoys a particularly close relationship with the composer. Vocal music, with the exception of the award-winning work Graffiti (2009) for choir and orchestra, is a rare medium among Lindberg’s output. Accused (2014) is Lindberg’s first work written for a solo voice and orchestra. The work was jointly commissioned by the London Philharmonic, Radio France, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra and Carnegie Hall. The work was premiered in London in January 2015. Lindberg chose extracts from actual interrogations in three historically and politically different situations: from the French Revolution, an extract from East Germany’ Stasi archives, and part of the Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning interrogation. Accused reflects universal human values that transcend transitory politics. Two Episodes (2016) is an orchestral work that was written for the London Prom's in 2016 to accompany Beethoven’s 9th Symphony. With this in mind the work is scored for a similar orchestra that is required to play Beethoven’s 9th. Lindberg also concluded his work on the same A–E fifth that opens Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, meaning that the transition can be without a pause. Nevertheless, Two Episodes is an independent work and can naturally be performed without the Beethoven. Beethoven’s musical thinking left an imprint on the work, though in the form of distanced references and spiritual kinship rather than stylistic influences. Although textural similarities to Beethoven can be identified in the music, they blend seamlessly into the colourful tapestry that principally seems to hark from the orchestral brilliance of Ravel and Debussy. © Ondine
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Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Ondine

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Mustonen, described by "The Sunday Times" as living dream of pianism, is known for delivering fresh and visionary approach to standard works this is evident in these masterful recordings of Beethovens Concertos. Mustonen is a particularly fitting exponent for Beethovens music as the composer himself was also both visionary and revolutionary in his approach to tradition. The recording of Piano Concerto No. 1 includes Mustonens own candenzas. Beethovens own Piano Concerto arrangement of his Violin Concerto is also featured one of Mustonens signature pieces. © Ondine
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Chamber Music - Released April 3, 2020 | Ondine

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New album of Beethoven’s late String Quartets by the prestigious Tetzlaff Quartett offers a fitting tribute to Beethoven’s 250th anniversary year. These monumental works which are given fresh interpretations by the quartet are among the greatest achievements in the history of Western art music written by a composer who had already largely lost contact with the world. When writing his final String Quartets (Op. 127–135) Beethoven was becoming increasingly ill and understood that he would never be able to recover fully. Beethoven had just completed his 9th Symphony when he received a commission to write string quartets. What resulted was a string of totally unique masterpieces highly individual in their language and unusual in their form. String Quartet in A minor, Op. 132 is a work in 5 movements with movements Nos. 1, 3, and 5 being the central bearers of meaning. The quartet’s hub and pivot is the middle part of the work, Heiliger Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit, in der lidischen Tonart ("Holy Song of Thanksgiving of a Convalescent to the Divinity, in the Lydian Mode"). The biographical context of this title is obvious and specifically refers to the severe bout of illness experienced by Beethoven from the middle of April to the beginning of May 1825. The Grosse Fuge, Op. 133 is a work that has fascinated listeners for two centuries. Originally, String Quartet in B-flat major, Op. 130 and Grosse Fuge Op. 133 were part of one and same work. Beethoven had written the Fuge as the final movement for the String Quartet, but his publisher urged him to write a new ending. For this album, Tetzlaff Quartett performs the String Quartet Op. 130 together with the Grosse Fuge, thus bringing the work back to its original form. Praised by "The New York Times" for its “dramatic, energetic playing of clean intensity”, the Tetzlaff Quartett is one of today’s leading string quartets. Alongside their successful individual careers, Christian and Tanja Tetzlaff, Hanna Weinmeister and Elisabeth Kufferath have met since 1994 to perform several times each season in concerts that regularly receive great critical acclaim. They are frequent guests at international festivals such as the Berliner Festwochen, Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival and Bremen Musikfest. Other recent highlights include performances at Kölner Philharmonie, Konzerthaus Berlin and Paris’ Auditorium du Louvre, as well as a North America tour with concerts at Carnegie Hall, in San Francisco and Vancouver. The quartet has also performed at Brussels’ BOZAR, Wiener Musikverein, Herkulessaal München, Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw and London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. © Ondine
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Classical - Released April 3, 2020 | Ondine

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The second album in Lars Vogt’s Johannes Brahms concerto series with the Royal Northern Sinfonia includes Brahms’ 2nd Piano Concerto combined with a solo piano work, Handel Variations Op. 24, which was dedicated to Clara Schumann by the composer. Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 is a romantic 4-movement concerto written two decades after its predecessor and one of the cornerstones in the concerto repertoire. This remarkable opus with a great number of beautiful solo passages and with a duration of over 45 minutes has been intrepreted by numerous pianists since its premiere in 1881. In this album, Vogt performs the concerto conducting from the keyboard. Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel Op. 24 for solo piano were written by the young composer in his late 20s. This work, which includes some technically demanding passages for the pianists, reveals Brahms’ profound interest in the work of the great masters of the Baroque era which served as a source of inspiration in the composer’s creative work. This set of 25 variations and a fugue shows Brahms as a great successor to the tradition of piano variations exemplified by Mozart and Beethoven. ©: Ondine
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Classical - Released April 3, 2020 | Ondine

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This release by the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Modestas Pitrėnas includes the complete surviving symphonic oeuvre of the great Lithuanian composer Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis (1875–1911) restored back into their original versions. Čiurlionis was conceptually ahead of his time and the uniqueness and aesthetic value of his compositions have been fully understood only during the last decades. For the international audience Čiurlionis is particularly known as a painter who gave titles related to music to his paintings, but he wrote an impressive catalogue of at least over 340 music compositions, including 10 orchestral works. Čiurlionis studied composition under professor Carl Reinecke in Leipzig. He submerged himself into investigation of orchestrations of Hector Berlioz and especially Richard Strauss. His symphonic poems In the Forest (1900–1901) and The Sea (1903–1907) remain the cornerstones of Lithuanian symphonic repertoire. In the Forest brought Lithuanian professional academic music into existence, while The Sea remains an unsurpassed peak in the history of Lithuanian symphonic literature. Sadly, both works were premiered only after the composer’s death, in 1911 and 1936. Although both works were published, it was only in recent years when they have been cleared of editions by other composers back into their original form finally bringing to the listener the way how the composer envisioned them. The 30-minute symphonic poem The Sea has particularly sad history of editions and ‘improvements’ by other composers, but this recording includes the work in its original form. © Ondine
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Classical - Released March 6, 2020 | Ondine

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This album marks Peter Jablonski’s debut for the Ondine label. Alexander Scriabin (1872–1915) created an impressive catalogue of works for the piano and became one of the great innovators in 20th century music. In his early works, the listener can sense the composer’s great admiration for the art of Frédéric Chopin. This is especially manifested in the over 20 Mazurkas that Scriabin wrote for the solo piano, the very same form of music that Chopin followed throughout his active years as a composer. Jablonski's album includes all Scriabin's Mazurkas with an opus number as well as two early Mazurkas. Scriabin’s Mazurkas reveal various stages in the composer’s creative career. Ten Mazurkas Op. 3 are early pieces. Although the composer, like many of his colleagues, was deeply influenced by Chopin, yet Scriabin’s distinctive voice is unmistakable here. In the Nine Mazurkas Op. 25 the composer is starting to push harmonic and melodic invention to their extremes, delaying harmonic resolution, blurring the lines between the distinct lilt of the mazurka and often entering the realm of a dream waltz, or a tone poem. Two Mazurkas Op. 40 were written around the time of his 4th Piano Sonata and are more intimate and economic in style already pointing to completely new harmonic and philosophical directions that were to dominate Scriabin’s mind from then on. In his last ever public performance in St Petersburg on 2 April, 1915 Scriabin included his Mazurka Op. 25/4 into the programme. Peter Jablonski is an internationally acclaimed Swedish pianist. Discovered by Claudio Abbado and Vladimir Ashkenazy and signed by Decca at the age of 17, he went on to perform, collaborate, and record with over 150 of the world’s leading orchestras and conductors. He has performed and recorded the complete piano concertos by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Bartók, and all piano sonatas by Prokofiev. Hailed as an ‘unconventional virtuoso’, during his three-decade-long career he developed a diverse and worked with composers Witold Lutosławski and Arvo Pärt. Jablonski’s extensive discography includes several award-winning recordings. © Ondine
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Classical - Released March 6, 2020 | Ondine

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First volume in a series dedicated to Paul Hindemith’s (1895–1963) chamber works includes the first three works in his Kammermusik series together with Kleine Kammermusik written for a wind quintet. This album continues a successful series of recordings of Hindemith’s music together with conductor Christoph Eschenbach. These recordings of chamber music have been recorded with a group of young promising artists, including pianist Christopher Park and cellist Bruno Philippe who are playing the solo parts in the ‘Concertos’, Op. 36. Hindemith’s postwar period may rightly be described as a time of new beginnings not only for Hindemith personally but also for the European concert world, both in economic and artistic respects. It was during this time that Hindemith wrote his Kammermusik No. 1 (1922), a work for an ensemble of twelve solo instruments. Through to 1929 it was followed by six solo concertos that he designated as the Kammermusiken Nos. 2–7. At the premieres of four of these works the composer himself performed as an instrumentalist or as a conductor. Hindemith described the special character of such solo concertos for chamber orchestra in 1925, when he evaluated compositions that had been submitted to a competition: “The term ‘solo concerto’ is almost nowhere properly understood. Work indeed is done with solo instruments, but they do not perform in concerto style. In others, the prescribed ‘chamber orchestra’ is merely a reduced large orchestra that […] limits itself to producing a noise similar to the one traditionally produced by the larger groups of musicians but with shriveled means. In my view, this chamber orchestra has nothing to do with a proper chamber orchestra, in which only a few instruments of a very specific character (specified by the work) are in operation and with which genuine chamber-musical work is done.” By the time Hindemith ended the series of his seven Kammermusiken in 1929, he stood at the center of the German music world. © Ondine
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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Ondine

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In 1966, Pierre Boulez conducted the world premiere of Witold Lutoslawski’s Second Symphony. Boulez was then the head of the NDR orchestra in Hamburg and the city welcomed a series dedicated to contemporary music. The following year, the piece was performed fully in Katowice, Poland, conducted by the composer. Lutoslawski was a brilliant man: he spoke many languages, including French, and was an excellent conductor. First influenced by Bartók and French impressionist music, Witold Lutoslawski then forged a much more cutting-edge style based on the Second Viennese School. He invented the “aleatory counterpoint,” which remains his trademark. It can seem odd that Lutoslawski chose the frame of the symphony to express this new language. Nevertheless, it is with this form, that everyone thought dead, that he radically explored his aleatory techniques, specifically in the two movements of his Second Symphony. Melody and Rhythm are replaced by tones, harmony and texture and the music is continuously pulsed. Lutoslawski’s Second Symphony saluted Beethoven’s Fifth. His Third Symphony went further, developing the two-part structure of the previous and adding a long and abundant epilogue which left room for a few melodic elements during its elegiac final rising. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released February 7, 2020 | Ondine

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