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Trip

Mike Stern

Jazz - Released September 8, 2017 | Heads Up

Hi-Res Booklet
During the 80s, Mike Stern was a five star jazz fusion expert. Knighted by Miles Davis—who took him along between 1981 and 1985—he also worked with Billy Cobham and Jaco Pastorius. The guitarist from Boston unleashed an impressive virtuosity and a rather violent playing that contrasted with the one from his peers. His career was punctuated with highs and lows and several struggles with drugs and alcohol… During the summer of 2016, Stern fell hard while at home and broke his two arms. The nerve endings of his right hand had even been damaged! But after a few passages under the knife, he was able to take his Telecaster back and learn to use it brilliantly again. This aptly named Trip is therefore the disc about a voyage towards resurrection. It’s an album that proves above all that his playing, his signature, his phrases are definitely there, still intact! Helped by a dream cast that notably includes bass players Victor Wooten, Edmond Gilmore and Teymur Phell; drummers Dennis Chambers, Lenny White, Will Calhoun and Dave Weckl; trumpet players Randy Brecker and Wallace Roney; keyboard player Jim Beard and saxophonist Bill Evans, Mike Stern pens an album which rivals those from his golden age, sometimes looking towards the Miles he knew, during the period of The Man With The Horn/Star People. Mostly, Trip shows him in various contexts, able of impressive guitaristic pyrotechnics as well as more introspective and tempered moments. Welcome back! © CM/Qobuz
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Trip

Mike Stern

Jazz - Released September 8, 2017 | Heads Up

During the 80s, Mike Stern was a five star jazz fusion expert. Knighted by Miles Davis—who took him along between 1981 and 1985—he also worked with Billy Cobham and Jaco Pastorius. The guitarist from Boston unleashed an impressive virtuosity and a rather violent playing that contrasted with the one from his peers. His career was punctuated with highs and lows and several struggles with drugs and alcohol… During the summer of 2016, Stern fell hard while at home and broke his two arms. The nerve endings of his right hand had even been damaged! But after a few passages under the knife, he was able to take his Telecaster back and learn to use it brilliantly again. This aptly named Trip is therefore the disc about a voyage towards resurrection. It’s an album that proves above all that his playing, his signature, his phrases are definitely there, still intact! Helped by a dream cast that notably includes bass players Victor Wooten, Edmond Gilmore and Teymur Phell; drummers Dennis Chambers, Lenny White, Will Calhoun and Dave Weckl; trumpet players Randy Brecker and Wallace Roney; keyboard player Jim Beard and saxophonist Bill Evans, Mike Stern pens an album which rivals those from his golden age, sometimes looking towards the Miles he knew, during the period of The Man With The Horn/Star People. Mostly, Trip shows him in various contexts, able of impressive guitaristic pyrotechnics as well as more introspective and tempered moments. Welcome back! © CM/Qobuz
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Groovin’

Peter White

Jazz - Released September 30, 2016 | Heads Up

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Groovin’

Peter White

Jazz - Released September 30, 2016 | Heads Up

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Live In Seattle

Mindi Abair and the Boneshakers

Jazz - Released September 25, 2015 | Heads Up

Hi-Res Booklet
Mindi Abair's 2014 Grammy-nominated studio album Wild Heart was star-studded and chock-full of imaginative charts, but they were so fixed, precious little room remained for players to stretch out. Abair remedies that on Live in Seattle, backed by the Boneshakers -- guitarist Randy Jacobs and vocalist Sweet Pea Atkinson -- and members of her own band. She is a celebrated contemporary jazz artist, but she's done many other things as well. On Live in Seattle, she channels her rock, funk, and blueswoman personas with her jazz chops at the fore. With Jacobs and Atkinson bringing blues-rock and hard soul edges from Detroit, what else could she do? "Wild Heart" commences with Jacobs' roiling, back-to-the-roots guitar vamping at the fore. Abair answers by matching the intensity with a funk vamp as the rhythm section lays down an elastic pocket. "I Can't Lose" reveals that her thin, grainy voice does have power (something lacking on Wild Heart); it climbs out on the ledge to express emotion on top of the band's swampy magic. Instrumentally, her alto solo careens into Jacobs' Hendrix-ian wah-wah guitar and the wallop of the rhythm section. She's a terrific accompanist, too, as evidenced by Jacobs' swaggering, Stevie Ray Vaughan-esque electric blues in "Ball and Chain," as Atkinson lends soulful depth in the backing vocal. "Make It Happen," a breakbeat-drenched souled-out funk stepper, is a previously unreleased jam Abair wrote with Booker T. Jones. Her raw, squawking alto and Jacobs' fat, rhythmic comping are a killer combination. For contemporary jazz fans, there's an uptempo version of the lyrical "Bloom" (from 2006's Life Less Ordinary). Her soloing here offers reveals the depth of her experience, both musical and emotional. Likewise, her vocal duet with Atkinson on the lovely "I'll Be Your Home" weds both Motown and Stax traditions seamlessly. An over the top, rockist instrumental version of George Gershwin's "Summertime" follows; it's rangy and wild. The exchanges between Abair's wailing, Jacobs' massive riffing, Third Richardson's breakbeat drums, Derek Frank's whomping basslines, and Rodney Lee's fluid, spiky keyboards offer abundant lyricism and kinetic force. Abair is no stranger to James Brown's tunes -- she brings Atkinson out to close with "Cold Sweat." The band's attack is more blues than funk, but Atkinson's alternately silky and grainy soul delivery turns this nugget inside-out. Live in Seattle was a gutsy move following the commercial success of Wild Heart, but it was the right one. On earlier records and in her session work, Abair's musical wild side could only be heard in brief flashes. But with the perfect balance of players, and freed from the constraints of a studio, she is at her unfettered best. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Live In Seattle

Mindi Abair and the Boneshakers

Jazz - Released September 25, 2015 | Heads Up

Mindi Abair's 2014 Grammy-nominated studio album Wild Heart was star-studded and chock-full of imaginative charts, but they were so fixed, precious little room remained for players to stretch out. Abair remedies that on Live in Seattle, backed by the Boneshakers -- guitarist Randy Jacobs and vocalist Sweet Pea Atkinson -- and members of her own band. She is a celebrated contemporary jazz artist, but she's done many other things as well. On Live in Seattle, she channels her rock, funk, and blueswoman personas with her jazz chops at the fore. With Jacobs and Atkinson bringing blues-rock and hard soul edges from Detroit, what else could she do? "Wild Heart" commences with Jacobs' roiling, back-to-the-roots guitar vamping at the fore. Abair answers by matching the intensity with a funk vamp as the rhythm section lays down an elastic pocket. "I Can't Lose" reveals that her thin, grainy voice does have power (something lacking on Wild Heart); it climbs out on the ledge to express emotion on top of the band's swampy magic. Instrumentally, her alto solo careens into Jacobs' Hendrix-ian wah-wah guitar and the wallop of the rhythm section. She's a terrific accompanist, too, as evidenced by Jacobs' swaggering, Stevie Ray Vaughan-esque electric blues in "Ball and Chain," as Atkinson lends soulful depth in the backing vocal. "Make It Happen," a breakbeat-drenched souled-out funk stepper, is a previously unreleased jam Abair wrote with Booker T. Jones. Her raw, squawking alto and Jacobs' fat, rhythmic comping are a killer combination. For contemporary jazz fans, there's an uptempo version of the lyrical "Bloom" (from 2006's Life Less Ordinary). Her soloing here offers reveals the depth of her experience, both musical and emotional. Likewise, her vocal duet with Atkinson on the lovely "I'll Be Your Home" weds both Motown and Stax traditions seamlessly. An over the top, rockist instrumental version of George Gershwin's "Summertime" follows; it's rangy and wild. The exchanges between Abair's wailing, Jacobs' massive riffing, Third Richardson's breakbeat drums, Derek Frank's whomping basslines, and Rodney Lee's fluid, spiky keyboards offer abundant lyricism and kinetic force. Abair is no stranger to James Brown's tunes -- she brings Atkinson out to close with "Cold Sweat." The band's attack is more blues than funk, but Atkinson's alternately silky and grainy soul delivery turns this nugget inside-out. Live in Seattle was a gutsy move following the commercial success of Wild Heart, but it was the right one. On earlier records and in her session work, Abair's musical wild side could only be heard in brief flashes. But with the perfect balance of players, and freed from the constraints of a studio, she is at her unfettered best. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Silver

Fourplay

Jazz - Released October 9, 2015 | Heads Up

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Step It Up

Jeff Lorber Fusion

Jazz - Released October 23, 2015 | Heads Up

Hi-Res Booklet
Step It Up, the fourth offering from the revamped Jeff Lorber Fusion, picks up almost exactly where 2014's Grammy-nominated Hacienda left off -- with a couple of twists. Keyboardist Lorber and bassist Jimmy Haslip co-produced the 57-minute, 11-track set of originals. The pair got help from their regular stable of sessionmen including guitarists Paul Jackson, Jr. and Michael Thompson, saxophonist Gary Meek, percussionist Lenny Castro, and a slew of drummers including Vinnie Colaiuta. There are also a couple of star guest appearances from Haslip's former Yellowjackets bandmates, tenorman Bob Mintzer and guitarist Robben Ford. The horn charts were expertly scripted by David Mann. Musically, this material harkens back to the mid-'70s; knotty funk, modal jazz, and the melodic invention of R&B are carefully balanced in a breezy, thoughtful, and spine-tingling presentation. "Mustang," one of two pre-release singles, comes right out of Grover Washington, Jr.'s Feels So Good/Mr. Magic period, with a very similar keyboard vamp and contrasting harmonic interludes in the bridge. Colaiuta's kit and Castro's congas create a hypnotic center around the melody before Mintzer's meaty tenor break turns left of center. "Arecibo," the first of two tracks to feature Ford on lead guitar, is feel- good jazz-funk. The interplay between keyboard tones, melodies, and chunky rhythmic vamps contrast beautifully with the guitarist's deep blues fills and solo. Ford and Mintzer also feature on "Soul Party," the other single. Mann's horn chart has a wider color palette thanks to Haslip's bassline presence. The tenor, Lorber, and the guitarist dialogue in a series of finger-popping cadences, taut funk breaks, and fleet solo moments. Everything in the mix comes back to swinging, meaty, in-the-pocket R&B. As smooth as Galaxy and substantial as Hacienda, this set offers the best of both albums but goes further in its imaginative lyricism and charts. The groove quotient on Step It Up is exceptionally high, refracted through the prism of focused, precise compositions. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Silver

Fourplay

Jazz - Released October 9, 2015 | Heads Up

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Step It Up

Jeff Lorber Fusion

Jazz - Released October 23, 2015 | Heads Up

Step It Up, the fourth offering from the revamped Jeff Lorber Fusion, picks up almost exactly where 2014's Grammy-nominated Hacienda left off -- with a couple of twists. Keyboardist Lorber and bassist Jimmy Haslip co-produced the 57-minute, 11-track set of originals. The pair got help from their regular stable of sessionmen including guitarists Paul Jackson, Jr. and Michael Thompson, saxophonist Gary Meek, percussionist Lenny Castro, and a slew of drummers including Vinnie Colaiuta. There are also a couple of star guest appearances from Haslip's former Yellowjackets bandmates, tenorman Bob Mintzer and guitarist Robben Ford. The horn charts were expertly scripted by David Mann. Musically, this material harkens back to the mid-'70s; knotty funk, modal jazz, and the melodic invention of R&B are carefully balanced in a breezy, thoughtful, and spine-tingling presentation. "Mustang," one of two pre-release singles, comes right out of Grover Washington, Jr.'s Feels So Good/Mr. Magic period, with a very similar keyboard vamp and contrasting harmonic interludes in the bridge. Colaiuta's kit and Castro's congas create a hypnotic center around the melody before Mintzer's meaty tenor break turns left of center. "Arecibo," the first of two tracks to feature Ford on lead guitar, is feel- good jazz-funk. The interplay between keyboard tones, melodies, and chunky rhythmic vamps contrast beautifully with the guitarist's deep blues fills and solo. Ford and Mintzer also feature on "Soul Party," the other single. Mann's horn chart has a wider color palette thanks to Haslip's bassline presence. The tenor, Lorber, and the guitarist dialogue in a series of finger-popping cadences, taut funk breaks, and fleet solo moments. Everything in the mix comes back to swinging, meaty, in-the-pocket R&B. As smooth as Galaxy and substantial as Hacienda, this set offers the best of both albums but goes further in its imaginative lyricism and charts. The groove quotient on Step It Up is exceptionally high, refracted through the prism of focused, precise compositions. © Thom Jurek /TiVo

Smile

Peter White

Jazz - Released October 7, 2014 | Heads Up

Booklet
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Peter White's 14th studio effort, 2014's Smile, features more of the British guitarist's romantic, uplifting smooth jazz. This is White's third album of all-original material following 2009's Good Day and 2012's Here We Go. Joining White here is a bevy of big-name guest artists, including vocalist Mindi Abair, trumpeter Rick Braun, saxophonist Euge Groove, and others. Also backing White are such longtime collaborators as keyboardist Philippe Saisse, bassist Nate Phillips, and percussionist Ramon Yslas. White's original approach to smooth jazz has worked quite well for him, and Smile is no exception. As the title implies, these are largely upbeat, brightly melodic tunes that showcase White's knack for airy, often Latin-influenced songs that soar on his crisp guitar lines. We also get plenty of groove-oriented, R&B-infused cuts like "Head Over Heels," "Hold Me Close," and the layered, trip-hop-infused "Beautiful Love." White also achieves a pleasant balance between the acoustic, electric, and electronic sounds on the album that never moves too far in any one direction. Instead, each song is deftly arranged with just the right instrumentation and improvisation to keep things interesting. Ultimately, by sticking to his own material on Smile, White has offered something new and engaging that will certainly appeal to new and longtime fans alike. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Eclectic

Eric Johnson

Jazz - Released November 10, 2014 | Heads Up

Hi-Res Booklet
The seed for this project was planted when Eric Johnson played on a few tracks for Mike Stern's 2009 album Big Neighborhood. The two guitarists discovered a shared affinity for jazz and blues, along with those two genres' rambunctious stepchildren, R&B and funk, and both players had always embraced a stylish fusion approach to their respective work. It seems only obvious and natural that they do a full album together. Eclectic was recorded in mostly live takes at Johnson's studio in Austin, Texas, and included a rhythm section of drummer Anton Fig and Johnson's longtime bassist Chris Maresh, along with guest spots from singers Malford Milligan, Leni Stern (Mike Stern's wife), and Christopher Cross, blues harpist Guy Forsyth, and a horn section of John Mills (saxophone), Mike Mordecai (trombone), and Andrew Johnson (trumpet). The versatility on display here from track to track is impressive, ranging from blues to Wes Montgomery-inspired guitar jazz, new age fusion shuffles, and huge-sounding, jazz-inspired big-band imaginary soundtrack themes, and there's no lack of amazing guitar playing, both guitarists blending and flowing together like the two edges of a single river. Highlights include the opener, Stern's driving, jazzy, and funky "Roll with It" (it turns out Stern has a pretty good singing voice, by the way), the lovely, haunting, and chiming "Wishing Well," Johnson's "Hullabaloo" (which sounds like the opening theme to some long-lost Hollywood-based 1960s detective show), Stern's modal "Remember" (modeled on John Coltrane's "Impressions"), and the set's closer, a reverent and vibrant take on Jimi Hendrix's "Red House," which brings everything back to the late-night jazzy approach to the blues that Johnson and Stern both hold so dear. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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David Benoit Collection

David Benoit

Jazz - Released November 24, 2014 | Heads Up

Booklet
The David Benoit Collection brings together tracks off the smooth jazz artist's albums for Concord/Heads Up. Included are cuts off such albums as 2006's Full Circle, 2008's Heroes, 2010's Earthglow, and 2012's Conversation. These are laid-back, lightly funky recordings that run the gamut from instrumental R&B to classical, jazz, and Latin-infused sounds. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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David Benoit Collection

David Benoit

Jazz - Released November 24, 2014 | Heads Up

The David Benoit Collection brings together tracks off the smooth jazz artist's albums for Concord/Heads Up. Included are cuts off such albums as 2006's Full Circle, 2008's Heroes, 2010's Earthglow, and 2012's Conversation. These are laid-back, lightly funky recordings that run the gamut from instrumental R&B to classical, jazz, and Latin-infused sounds. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Smile

Peter White

Jazz - Released October 7, 2014 | Heads Up

Peter White's 14th studio effort, 2014's Smile, features more of the British guitarist's romantic, uplifting smooth jazz. This is White's third album of all-original material following 2009's Good Day and 2012's Here We Go. Joining White here is a bevy of big-name guest artists, including vocalist Mindi Abair, trumpeter Rick Braun, saxophonist Euge Groove, and others. Also backing White are such longtime collaborators as keyboardist Philippe Saisse, bassist Nate Phillips, and percussionist Ramon Yslas. White's original approach to smooth jazz has worked quite well for him, and Smile is no exception. As the title implies, these are largely upbeat, brightly melodic tunes that showcase White's knack for airy, often Latin-influenced songs that soar on his crisp guitar lines. We also get plenty of groove-oriented, R&B-infused cuts like "Head Over Heels," "Hold Me Close," and the layered, trip-hop-infused "Beautiful Love." White also achieves a pleasant balance between the acoustic, electric, and electronic sounds on the album that never moves too far in any one direction. Instead, each song is deftly arranged with just the right instrumentation and improvisation to keep things interesting. Ultimately, by sticking to his own material on Smile, White has offered something new and engaging that will certainly appeal to new and longtime fans alike. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Wild Heart

Mindi Abair

Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Heads Up

Hi-Res Booklet
Though saxophonist/vocalist Mindi Abair's last album was 2010's In Hi-Fi Stereo, she's been exceptionally busy as a touring and session musician. Wild Heart picks up where that record left off, albeit in a much rowdier, grimier fashion. It is a self-penned collection of (mostly) ramped-up, funky soul, R&B, and rock tunes, with hints of contemporary jazz thrown in. Its sound is crunchy, fat, and greasy. Electric guitars and bass are mixed right up front with her alto, tenor, and baritone saxes. Abair also enlisted a slew of all-star guests from across the pop spectrum. The slamming, funky, brass- and reed-drenched "Amazing Game" is a tribute to NOLA R&B and jazz and actively engages its other soloist, Trombone Shorty. The chart is tight and meaty and the horn breaks and dueling solos soar. The title track is a grainy modern take on soul-jazz with wah-wah guitars, B-3, and her alto, tenor, and baritone horns framed by Todd Simon's trumpet and Elizabeth Lea's trombone. The single "Haute Sauce" features grimy, old-school (as in Junior Walker) R&B and contains both a stellar alto break and a killer piano solo from Dave Yaden. Aerosmith's Joe Perry lends very basic (a good thing) yet roaring guitar chops to "Kick Ass." It's all riffing and screaming alto dueling with frenetic, in-the-red drumming by Jake Najor. "The Shakedown," with Max Weinberg and Waddy Wachtel, recalls mid-'60s rave-up discotheques and TV themes from teen dance shows. "Addicted to You" is a bluesy, slow-grooving quartet affair with Booker T. Jones on B-3. A couple of tunes don't work; predictably, they are vocal numbers such as "I Can't Lose" and "Train," where Abair's thin voice -- even multitracked -- is no match for the massive sonic attack she assembles. That said, the one place it does succeed is on the closer, "Just Say When," a vocal duet with Gregg Allman. Sans horns, the skeletal tune is framed by a basic rock band playing an effortless meld of Southern Americana and soul. Allman is in excellent voice and Abair's emotive, reedy contralto is the perfect counterpart. It's a hell of a way to end a record. As a whole, Wild Heart builds considerably on the strengths of In Hi-Fi Stereo, and is a much stronger effort overall. Though it pays unapologetic tribute to retro inspirations, it does so with 21st century sophistication, a gritty, raucous spirit, and exceptional creative imagination. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Slam Dunk

Gerald Albright

Jazz - Released August 5, 2014 | Heads Up

Hi-Res Booklet
Gerald Albright's 14th career album, 2014's Slam Dunk, once again showcases the veteran saxophonist's funky take on smooth jazz and instrumental R&B. The album is Albright's first actual solo release since 2010's Pushing the Envelope. It also comes on the heels of his 2012 collaboration with guitarist Norman Brown, 24/7. As with those and other past Albright releases, Slam Dunk is a highly dynamic album with tracks that run the gamut from kinetic, finger-snapping funk ("Slam Dunk") to atmospheric, sensual slow jams ("Because of You") to layered, Latin-inflected numbers ("Fiesta Interlude"). Albright also makes room for a few well-chosen covers in James Brown's "It's a Man's Man's Man's World" and the Cyndi Lauper '80s classic "True Colors." Similarly engaging are such cuts as the George Duke-inspired midtempo groover "The Duke," the evocative Peabo Bryson vocal feature "Where Did We Go Wrong?," and the uplifting album closer "Gospel." Instrumentally, Slam Dunk shines a spotlight on Albright's generous musical ability, and many of the tracks here feature multi-tracked saxophone intros (all played by Albright). Of course, the main draw with Albright is his soulful improvisation, and of that, Slam Dunk has plenty. Ultimately, Slam Dunk might not be a game-changer for Albright, but for longtime fans looking for an album that delivers on his urbane, sophisticated smooth jazz sound, it's a sure thing. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Lip Service

Richard Elliot

Jazz - Released August 25, 2014 | Heads Up

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Eclectic

Eric Johnson

Jazz - Released November 10, 2014 | Heads Up

The seed for this project was planted when Eric Johnson played on a few tracks for Mike Stern's 2009 album Big Neighborhood. The two guitarists discovered a shared affinity for jazz and blues, along with those two genres' rambunctious stepchildren, R&B and funk, and both players had always embraced a stylish fusion approach to their respective work. It seems only obvious and natural that they do a full album together. Eclectic was recorded in mostly live takes at Johnson's studio in Austin, Texas, and included a rhythm section of drummer Anton Fig and Johnson's longtime bassist Chris Maresh, along with guest spots from singers Malford Milligan, Leni Stern (Mike Stern's wife), and Christopher Cross, blues harpist Guy Forsyth, and a horn section of John Mills (saxophone), Mike Mordecai (trombone), and Andrew Johnson (trumpet). The versatility on display here from track to track is impressive, ranging from blues to Wes Montgomery-inspired guitar jazz, new age fusion shuffles, and huge-sounding, jazz-inspired big-band imaginary soundtrack themes, and there's no lack of amazing guitar playing, both guitarists blending and flowing together like the two edges of a single river. Highlights include the opener, Stern's driving, jazzy, and funky "Roll with It" (it turns out Stern has a pretty good singing voice, by the way), the lovely, haunting, and chiming "Wishing Well," Johnson's "Hullabaloo" (which sounds like the opening theme to some long-lost Hollywood-based 1960s detective show), Stern's modal "Remember" (modeled on John Coltrane's "Impressions"), and the set's closer, a reverent and vibrant take on Jimi Hendrix's "Red House," which brings everything back to the late-night jazzy approach to the blues that Johnson and Stern both hold so dear. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Eclectic

Eric Johnson

Jazz - Released November 10, 2014 | Heads Up

Booklet
The seed for this project was planted when Eric Johnson played on a few tracks for Mike Stern's 2009 album Big Neighborhood. The two guitarists discovered a shared affinity for jazz and blues, along with those two genres' rambunctious stepchildren, R&B and funk, and both players had always embraced a stylish fusion approach to their respective work. It seems only obvious and natural that they do a full album together. Eclectic was recorded in mostly live takes at Johnson's studio in Austin, Texas, and included a rhythm section of drummer Anton Fig and Johnson's longtime bassist Chris Maresh, along with guest spots from singers Malford Milligan, Leni Stern (Mike Stern's wife), and Christopher Cross, blues harpist Guy Forsyth, and a horn section of John Mills (saxophone), Mike Mordecai (trombone), and Andrew Johnson (trumpet). The versatility on display here from track to track is impressive, ranging from blues to Wes Montgomery-inspired guitar jazz, new age fusion shuffles, and huge-sounding, jazz-inspired big-band imaginary soundtrack themes, and there's no lack of amazing guitar playing, both guitarists blending and flowing together like the two edges of a single river. Highlights include the opener, Stern's driving, jazzy, and funky "Roll with It" (it turns out Stern has a pretty good singing voice, by the way), the lovely, haunting, and chiming "Wishing Well," Johnson's "Hullabaloo" (which sounds like the opening theme to some long-lost Hollywood-based 1960s detective show), Stern's modal "Remember" (modeled on John Coltrane's "Impressions"), and the set's closer, a reverent and vibrant take on Jimi Hendrix's "Red House," which brings everything back to the late-night jazzy approach to the blues that Johnson and Stern both hold so dear. © Steve Leggett /TiVo