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Classical - To be released November 6, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - To be released November 6, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Poppe’s composition Fett for orchestra dates from 2018/19 and was commissioned by the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association and its artistic director Gustavo Dudamel, and "musica viva". Enno Poppe is one of the most important younger representatives of New Music. His composition I cannot remember anything for chorus, organ and orchestra, based on words by Marcel Beyer, was written between 2005 and 2015 as a commission for Bayerischer Rundfunk’s "musica viva". The first performance in Germany was recorded on May 8, 2015 in the Herkulessaal of the Munich Residenz. The album edition of the “musica viva” series, founded in June 2000 to document the concert series that has existed since 1945, contains selected live recordings of “musica viva” concerts. An integral part of the edition is made up of concerts by the ensembles of the Bayerischer Rundfunk, guest recordings by international orchestras and ensembles, and also historical recordings. With two or three new releases per year, the main focus of the edition -which sees itself primarily as a series for composers –is mainly on portrait albums. © BR-Klassik
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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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The portrait of the British composer Rebecca Saunders, who lives in Germany, begins with her 2011 two-part violin concerto Still written in 2011. It was premiered at the Beethoven Festival in Bonn (with Carolin Widmann as soloist). The chamber music composition Aether for two bass clarinets was composed in 2015/16; and Albacame from a composition commission in 2014 by Bayerischer Rundfunk’s "musica viva" and BBC Radio 3 for the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra. The album edition of the “musica viva” series, founded in June 2000 to document the concert series that has existed since 1945, contains selected live recordings of “musica viva” concerts. An integral part of the edition is made up of concerts by the ensembles of the Bayerischer Rundfunk, guest recordings by international orchestras and ensembles, and also historical recordings. With two or three new releases per year, the main focus of the edition -which sees itself primarily as a series for composers –is mainly on portrait albums. © BR-Klassik
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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The version submitted by Howard Arman for the Bavarian Radio Chorus is based on surviving Mozart sources as well as on Süßmayr's additions; in several places, however, it reaches new conclusions that are implemented with due caution and humble respect for Mozart's magnificent original. Mozart's Requiem is followed by Neukomm's Respond Libera me, Domine – and for musical, liturgical and chronological reasons, the programme begins with Mozart's Vesperae solennes de Confessore KV 339 (1780), composed of psalms from the Old Testament as well as the Magnificat from the Gospel of St Luke and composed for the liturgical festival of a holy confessor. Howard Arman has prepended Mozart’s movements for the festival vespers with antiphons taken from the vespers De Confessore Pontifici (for a confessor who was a bishop) of the Gregorian Liber usualis, and has also composed his own organ intonations to enhance the antiphons. Although it remained incomplete as Mozart’s last work, the Requiem in D minor (1791) ranks as one of the most important settings of the Latin Mass for the Dead ever written. Immediately after Mozart's all too premature death, his pupil Franz Xaver Süßmayr elaborated a completed version that is still appreciated and regularly performed to this day because of its close proximity to the original – and this despite a number of new adaptations created over the years that sometimes add cautious improvements to the Süßmayr version or instead follow their own lights entirely. – Mozart’s Requiem KV 626 from 1791 is followed by Sigismund von Neukomm's Libera me, Domine, the Respond from the Liturgy of Exequies composed by Neukomm in 1821 as a liturgical completion of Mozart's Requiem for a performance in Rio de Janeiro (the Salzburg composer Neukomm had emigrated to Brazil in 1816). © BR-Klassik
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Anton Bruckner's symphonies were a constant part of the repertoire for Mariss Jansons and the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks. The existing recordings - almost all the great Bruckner symphonies - are important documents of Jansons’ deep understanding of the works, and the high musical quality of the recordings also testifies to the long Bruckner tradition at the BRSO. Jansons followed Bruckner’s notes and markings with painstaking precision, and listening to a recording with the score reveals again and again how closely the conductor studied these works with the musicians of his orchestra. Bruckner's symphonies form the backbone of Late Romantic symphonic music. To a certain extent, Bruckner reinvented the symphony – something that not even Liszt or Wagner had dared to do in the wake of the groundbreaking masterpieces of Beethoven, which until then had been considered the culmination and conclusion of the genre. It was Bruckner and, somewhat later, Brahms who sought and found new methods of reviving the symphonic genre and developing it further. In this regard, Bruckner's approach was entirely new. From the outset, he relied on the sound of the large orchestra and, rather than mixing the individual groups of instruments, he tended to either separate them from each other or couple them together like organ registers (with which, as an organist, he was very familiar). Terraced dynamics, that is, the immediate juxtaposition of piano and forte without transition, was also something Bruckner derived from organ music. As a church musician, he had close contact with these and other elements of Baroque music, and they flowed into his symphonies. As far as dramaturgical development was concerned, he tended to favor Schubert; indeed, it was the organic continuation and alternating interconnection of themes Bruckner had learned from Schubert that also explains the unprecedented performance length of his symphonies. © BR-Klassik
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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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“Increasingly, Shostakovich's music is captivating people all over the world and appealing to their deepest emotions. Almost like no other, it bears witness to a traumatic political epoch while remaining a timeless expression of existential human feeling and experience. For me personally,” said conductor Mariss Jansons, who died last year, “Shostakovich is one of the most serious and sincere composers of them all.” After the Sixth, Seventh, and Tenth Symphonies, BR-Klassik is now also releasing the Fifth Symphony by this important composer – performed live by the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks under its long-time chief conductor Mariss Jansons. After accusations of formalism directed against Shostakovich in a critical Pravda article had forced the composer to withdraw his Fourth Symphony (it remained shelved until after Stalin's death), the Fifth, written in 1937, was a phenomenal success. It premiered on November 21, 1937 under the young conductor Yevgeny Mravinsky in the Great Hall of the Leningrad Philharmonic. During the applause, which it seemed would never end, Mravinsky waved the score above his head for a good half hour - making it quite clear that the applause was for Shostakovich alone. Officially, the work was interpreted as the return of a prodigal son to the guidelines of Stalinist cultural policy. To this day the music has lost none of its fascination, and the Fifth Symphony ranks as one of Shostakovich’s best-known works. © BR-Klassik
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released July 3, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Opera - Released May 1, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Verdi strongly adhered to Italian patriotism and Attila is one of his works that goes to show it. A drama with a particularly inventive melodic invention, it aptly confronts the barbarian Attila, not devoid of greatness and humanity, the Roman general Ezio with his ambiguous character (“You will have the universe; but let Italy remain mine”) and the allegorical figure Odabella, an emblem of the Italian female fighters. Attila contains some major pages heralding the great works of maturity, especially in Attila’s scene and the grand finale of the first act. In this work and like so many others, Verdi carries his political ideas into an epic and national drama. Recorded during a concert at the Prince Regent Theatre in Munich on October 13, 2019, this production features the dark, deep voice of Italian bass baritone Ildebrando d’Archangelo, facing the powerful Ukrainian soprano Liudmyla Monastyrska, whose sharp style and impressive vocal abilities transfigure the Verdian melodies. Sicilian tenor Stefano La Colla en Foresto and Romanian baritone George Petean complete a motley but perfectly balanced cast. A special mention goes to the Bavarian Radio Choir, who bring a luxurious note to the Verdian drama conducted here by the Croatian conductor Ivan Repušić, marking his induction concert to his new position as Music Director of the Munich Radio Orchestra. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Opera - Released April 3, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released March 6, 2020 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released March 6, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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In 1905, when Josef Suk composed Asrael, his funeral symphony, he was mourning. He had recently lost both his father-in-law, Antonín Dvořák, and, a few months later, his beloved wife, Otilie. Deeply wounded by his loss, Suk turned Asrael into a rich and dense five-movement piece, lasting more than an hour. Of course, Josef Suk was mainly influenced by Dvořák. Nevertheless, he managed to find his own language, partly inspired by Richard Strauss and always playing with the boundaries of tonality. The Asrael Symphony is a long dance of death. It features the angel of death (Azraël in the Hebrew, Muslim and Sikh traditions) conceptualized as a recurring obsession. The piece’s structure is complex but various traditional styles are recognizable, such as a fugue and a scherzo. The music is dark and comforting, at the same time. The double basses, trombones, tubas, and bass drums dominate the low sound of its large symphonic orchestra. Asrael also includes a traditional soloist violinist playing a genuine and seductive part throughout the piece. Josef Suk’s extensive repertoire remains largely obscure outside of his home country but, since 2004 young Czech conductor Jakub Hrůša has been promoting his work with great dedication. In 2004 already, Hrůša performed Asrael for his graduation ceremony at the Rudolfinum in Prague. He was 23. In 2015, he recorded a first version of this masterpiece with the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra. The record was released on independent label Exton. Hrůša knows the music by heart and conducts with care and determination. He often includes the piece in his programs when he is invited to perform with the three orchestras that he regularly leads: the Bamberg Symphonic Orchestra where he stands as artistic director, the Czech Philharmonic and the Philharmonia Orchestra, as guest conductor. This record was made in October 2018 at the Gasteig in Munich, where Hrůša gave two concerts with the excellent Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 3, 2020 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This surprisingly coupled album has been released by BR Klassik since the death of Mariss Jansons in December 2019. In Carmen's Suite, a ballet score for strings, timpani and four percussion groups written to the attention of his wife, the ballerina Maya Plisetskaya (1925-2015), the Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin transcribed excerpts of Bizet’s music, in striving to get away from it. This work incorporates music from Bizet's opera, plus material from the second L'Arlésienne Suite and La jolie fille de Perth. Throughout this rustic and playful work, the colourful, fiery and rhythmic orchestra gives the feeling of having fun at the same time as Jansons shows his science of conducting. In Respighi, contrary to the sense of over-the-top spectacle of Riccardo Muti, Jansons shows greater restraint, not without creating impressive moments, highlighted by a very good sound recording. © Qobuz 
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Comedy/Other - Released January 3, 2020 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released December 6, 2019 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released December 6, 2019 | BR-Klassik

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Opera - Released November 15, 2019 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | BR-Klassik

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Over the course of his 65-year conducting career, Bernard Haitink has recorded Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 in D minor, "Choral" on several occasions, and this solid performance with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra joins the admirable recordings he has made with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, and the London Symphony Orchestra. Of these, the LSO's 2006 release offers the best sound quality, with direct stream digital reproduction that captures everything in the score, and it is recommended for audiophiles who require its transparency and spacious audio reproduction. For most listeners' purposes, though, Haitink has recorded a similar interpretation with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, and despite the absence of multichannel technology, this release has decent sound that most listeners will find satisfactory and a highly detailed performance that is quite comparable to the others. Haitink's great virtue is consistency, and this regularity over multiple recordings throughout his career has made him one of the most dependable conductors of standard symphonic repertoire. Add to this the exceptional quartet of soprano Sally Matthews, alto Gerhild Romberger, tenor Mark Padmore, and bass Gerald Finley, and the robust singing from the Bavarian Radio Chorus, and the total effect of the symphony, particularly the "Ode to Joy," is impressive and thrilling. © TiVo