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Pop - Released February 8, 2000 | Universal Records

Part of Universal's massive 20th Century Masters/The Millennium Collection, this 12-song budget set draws on a dozen of Jones' best-known tunes. Highlights include "It's Not Unusual," "What's New Pussycat?," "Green Green Grass of Home," "I'll Never fall in Love Again," "Delilah," and "She's a Lady." A perfect, bare-bones introduction to this artist's early hits. © Cub Koda /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 1, 1965 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

It had been six years since Tom Jones released his last stateside record, but this one scored big in England and on the Continent, for good reason. Ultra-modern and topical, Reload suggests you can easily ignore Jones' "What's New Pussycat?" past. Not only does Jones deliver one of the more invigorating workings of modern pop here, his selection of material and choice of mates prove that in addition to his routinely extraordinary performances, he's still recording quite potently, thank you. Like 1994's underrated "The Lead and How To Swing It," a lesser seller from the Interscope label, "Reload" finds Tom in collaborative mode. But where The Lead stressed original tunes and producer chops (everyone from Teddy Riley to Flood to Trevor Horn weighed in), Reload focuses on contemporary artists and cover songs. The artists are a motley, and very talented, crew indeed. Jones more than holds his own, turning the tunes into unusually personal and expressive vehicles. Jones launches the disc with Talking Heads' "Burning Down the House," working it brisk and funky with the Cardigans and lending David Byrne's opaque lyrics a fresh vigor. Then, with Stereophonics, he resurrects Randy Newman's "Mama Told Me Not to Come," refreshing the Three Dog Night chestnut with unexpected lasciviousness. The selections are as peculiar as they are successful, spanning "Sometimes We Cry" (a sparsely arranged duet with Van Morrison), a sharp interpretation of Iggy Pop's "Lust for Life" with Chrissie Hynde's Pretenders, and a fruity, truly bizarre take on the George Baker Selection's "Little Green Bag" with Barenaked Ladies. Jones probably doesn't do knee drops anymore, but he sure as hell does vocal swoops; check out "Ain't That a Lot of Love" with Simply Red's Mick Hucknall or his resurrection of Fine Young Cannibals' "She Drives Me Crazy" with Zucchero for throat acrobatics. Jones is in the uncomfortable position of being a retro novelty, and although he may not ignite the U.S. charts anymore (his last notable effort here was his great collaboration with the Art of Noise on the Prince tune "Kiss," in 1988), his music is as contemporary and driving as ever. © Carlo Wolff /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

For those who think Tom Jones is nothing but kitsch, camp, and sex appeal, this rootsy, poignant, and highly spiritual album will come as a shock. On the other hand, for those who have kept up with his recent activity, Praise & Blame seemed inevitable with Sir Tom’s appearance in Martin Scorsese’s The Blues being the big clue. In the PBS documentary, Jones displayed a shockingly deep knowledge and deeper love of the American songbook, just as he does here. Perfectly chosen numbers from John Lee Hooker (“Burning Hell”), Rosetta Tharpe (“Strange Things”), and Jessie Mae Hemphill (“Lord Help”) support the album’s rite-of-passage theme as the now-70-year-old Jones rages and regrets throughout this selection of hallowed material. Producer Ethan Johns (Kings of Leon, Ray LaMontagne) is right in tune with Jones, helming gutsy band performances that are either a barroom punch in the gut or a dustier version of the Daniel Lanois sound. The best example of the latter is the incredibly bold opener “What Good Am I?”, a Dylan song performed with surprising restraint in what is arguably the singer’s most poignant performance to date. All of the ballads are naked, raw, and haunting in the most Scott Walker-like way imaginable, and while the guitar-driven blues rave-ups offer relief, it takes repeated listens to smooth out the drastic changes between the two styles. Of course, rich albums often demand return visits to reap all the rewards, but Praise & Blame goes beyond, and could be considered a life partner that yields new truths -- often painful truths -- as the listener grows older and wiser. The second half of the set is filled with adaptations from Jones and Johns, and if you don’t believe that it stands up to the first half, it’s just because you haven’t heard it. It does because these men were well above inspired, they were possessed, and Praise & Blame winds up an undeniably excellent album that you’re either ready for or you’re not. Much had been made of the leaked pre-release memo from Island’s vice-president, which called this masterpiece a “sick joke.” Just another example that there are tin ears at the top of the music business, but more than that, the statement is proof that high-rise living can suck the life out of you and that the meek -- of which Jones is now officially a member -- shall win in the end. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 23, 2021 | S-Curve Records

Surrounded by Time is Tom Jones' 42nd album, his first since the passing of wife Linda in 2016. Since 1965, the Welsh vocalist, possessed of a singular booming baritone, has sung almost every form of popular music of all stripes. This is Jones' fourth album with producer Ethan Johns, and includes his manager/son Mark Woodward as co-producer. Surrounded by Time differs from Jones' previous outings with Johns, which were rooted in Americana sources. The set opens with a sparsely orchestrated reinvention of Bernice Johnson Reagon's activist classic "I Won't Crumble with You If You Fall." Jones performs the lyric like a gospel preacher atop Neil Cowley's and Johns' layered Moogs, Nick Pini's arco bass, and Dan See's mallets. He follows with a glorious version of Michel Legrand's "The Windmills of Your Mind." His delivery is at once dramatic and resonant, balancing reverie, desire, and pathos, while draped in post-electro sequencers, organ, Moog, and brooding rhythms. Jones chose Cat Stevens' "Pop Star" because it reminded him of his first brush with fame. Johns paints the jagged arrangement with Chamberlins, Mellotrons, DFAM, sitar, and acoustic guitars, providing urgency alongside the singer's joy. Jones offers Malvina Reynolds' topical folk gem "No Hole in My Head" as organ-drenched psychedelic rock, complete with droning tambouras and electric guitars. His take of Michael Kiwanuka's "I Won't Lie" is colored by airy synths, acoustic guitars, bird calls, and satellite sounds. Jones' delivery is uncharacteristically tender, intimate, even vulnerable. The singer renders Mike Scott's "This Is the Sea" with the passionate authority of a blues singer. Acoustic guitars and organ simmer and soar alongside his roaring vocal as the rhythm section (barely) tethers them to earth. The singer reads Bob Dylan's foreboding "One More Cup of Coffee" through the mistakes of his youth. Amid the slurry instrumental swirl, a plodding upright bass exhorts Jones to face his darkness. He surrenders, offering the line "One more cup of coffee before I go/To the valley below" with chilling intensity. Organs, synth pads, Moogs, and guitars paint a spaghetti western backdrop as Jones goes deep on Tony Joe White's "Ol' Mother Earth." He delivers it as a solemn elegy for the planet. Composer Bobby Cole presented Jones with "I'm Growing Old" when the singer was 35; feeling he was too young to sing it then, he promised to cut it when he turned 80. Ambient sonics and disembodied voices float by, then vanish as Jones begins a desolate croon, accompanied only by Cowley's haunted piano. Jones chose Terry Callier's "Lazarus Man" as a set closer. After a spacey electronic intro, silvery guitars, droning bass, Rhodes piano, and thundering drums offer a sonic maelstrom in blues, spiritual soul, and rock. Jones embraces it all, passionately affirming the lyric as a manifesto for whatever time remains to him. Surrounded by Time is magnificent -- it's redolent with wisdom and a raging lust for life that is free of camp. It offers abundant proof that despite the passing of years, Jones has lost none his power or swagger. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | New Rounder

Although it isn't the revelation or surprising, extraordinary achievement that his 2010 record Praise & Blame was, Spirit in the Room is another solid, very welcome set of stripped-back interpretations from Tom Jones, produced once again by Ethan Johns, making those comparisons to Johnny Cash's late-period recordings with Rick Rubin all the more fitting. Know that the songbook has changed from classic (spirituals, blues, and traditional numbers) to more contemporary (Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen, Paul McCartney, the Low Anthem, and others) and that Jones and Johns are both in top form and you've got the picture, along with that same frustration that no matter how fun "What's New Pussycat?" and "Sex Bomb" were, a couple more albums like this along the way would have been rich and rewarding. Jones joins the ranks of singers who have really "felt" Cohen's words in "Tower of Song," here in one of its most naked of performances, but as the dark carnival of Tom Waits' "Bad as Me" gives way to a frail, delicate, and lonely Richard Thompson song, it's obvious this one doesn't have that last one's purposeful layout, at least not until the fourth quarter. Exiting with the off-kilter and brittle "All Blues Hail Mary" (Joe Henry) and the spiritual/secular strangeness that's "Charlie Darwin" (Low Anthem) makes for a compelling suite, and while Spirit in the Room matches its predecessor on a track-by-track level, it's only in those last moments that the whole package seems as thematically sound and well designed. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1968 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Goldies label is dependable for one thing: you never know what you're going to get. This compilation by Tom Jones is a case in point. While there are some of his classic songs here such as "Delilah" and "She's a Lady," they are not the original versions. They're recorded with a big studio band with a funked up bassline and some cheesy keyboards with a bigger than God horn section and a doubled up female backing chorus. But those aren't the biggest surprises. Those come later, making this an almost indispensable collection. Some of the other cuts on this set are a killer -- if overblown -- version of the hard soul nugget "Knock on Wood," and that's just the beginning. Over a total of 14 cuts that all feel as if they were somehow recorded for television (since there is no info you'll never know), you get versions of the Beatles' "Let It Be," John Lennon's last single "(Just Like) Starting Over," the Eagles "Take It to the Limit," Eric Clapton's "Lay Down Sally," and Eddie Cooley's R&B classic "Fever!" But that's not all. "Let Your Love Flow," "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'," and Lionel Richie's "Endless Love," Otis Redding's "I Can't Turn You Loose," and Ronnie Bell's "Celebration" are here, too. This is an utterly surreal and vocally fantastic set of Tom Jones performances. His voice is in powerful form, and the arrangements for all their bombast are not all that distracting or out of line with what he's trying to put across. If you've already got the hits and wonder if there is anything else worth having, this baby is it. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 1, 1971 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Although the title track was Tom Jones' biggest hit and its double-sided follow-up "Puppet Man" / "Resurrection Shuffle" was nearly as good as its predecessor, She's a Lady featured one of Jones' weakest collections of made-to-order songs, which were almost all indistinguishable from each other. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 1, 1970 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released March 1, 1967 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

With Green, Green Grass of Home, Tom Jones began to abandon his teenage pop audience to concentrate on a more mature, middle of the road group of listeners. Although he did include uptempo R&B numbers like "Kansas City," and the album's strongest moments occurred when he concentrated on standards and country tunes like the title track, "My Mother's Eyes," and "That Old Black Magic," or when he turned in laidback soul songs like "Any Day Now." The album was still inconsistent, as Jones over-sang several of the tracks, but it was easily the best album he had recorded to date. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Pop - Released October 13, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Pop - Released January 1, 1966 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The soundtrack to What's New Pussycat? suffered from the same lack of memorable material as It's Not Unusual, with only the title track and "With These Hands" standing out among the album's 12 tracks, but the rest of the record was agreeable and well-produced. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1989 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The infectious title track was a Top 40 hit and it helped make Help Yourself Tom Jones' first Top Ten album, but the record was weighed down by lackluster material, making the album his weakest set since A-Tom-Ic Jones. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1967 | UMC-Decca

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Pop - Released November 1, 1969 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Tom Jones' greatest strength is as a showman, making Tom Jones Live in Las Vegas one of his strongest records. As he tears through his well-constructed show, the vocalist works the reserved crowd into a near-frenzy, which makes him sing stronger and more dramatically. However, Tom Jones is at his best when he is at his most melodramatic, so this isn't a flaw. Jones' impassioned performance and the absence of weak material make Live in Las Vegas one of his most consistent records. Not surprisingly, it was also his biggest hit, peaking at number three on the American album charts. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 1, 1969 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Tom Jones revels in MOR pop for this mostly fine 1969 long-player. Big-band swank makes a rare appearance on opener "Fly Me to the Moon," while the remainder ranges through the likes of "Little Green Apples," "Wichita Lineman," and "Hey Jude." The layered string and choral backdrop gets a soul update on "Sitting on the Dock of the Bay" and Betty Everett and Jerry Butler's duet hit "Let It Be Me," as "Dance of Love"'s pelvic R&B makes for a quick glimpse of the singer's show-stomping energy. Save for the lag brought on by a few overblown, one-dimensional ballads ("That's All Any Man Can Say," "That Wonderful Sound"), This Is Tom Jones keeps up the singer's solid run of late-'60s releases. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 13, 2020 | UMC-Decca

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Pop - Released February 28, 2015 | Piros - Send

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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | S-Curve Records

To quote an earlier comeback record from Tom Jones (not that he ever left), he not only has the lead but he knows how to swing it. While it's true that 24 Hours appears close to 50 years after Jones first started playing with local Welsh beat groups, there's still plenty of evidence that this is the same singer who caused timid radio broadcasters to reconsider playing his records and women to throw uncountable pairs of knickers toward the stage. Helmed by production team Future Cut -- also behind tracks by Lily Allen, Estelle, and Kelis, among others -- the record charts a perfect balance between the type of throwback soul that would appeal to fans of the artists mentioned above (plus Amy Winehouse or Nikka Costa) as well as those who treasure his beefy late-'60s productions. After all, not many listeners want to hear a refined Tom Jones. They want the power and bravado of "It's Not Unusual" and "What's New, Pussycat?" And, fortunately, that's exactly what they get here, from the knockout first single "If He Should Ever Leave You," the opener "I'm Alive," the aggressive and flirtatious "Sugar Daddy," and "In Style and Rhythm." Often, when performers attempt to update their sound, they end up sounding hopelessly lost or bewildered, but Jones has changed with the times throughout his career. Just as importantly, he's always chosen collaborators who can pinpoint how his classic sound would work in a contemporary context. Here, it's a pounding and drum-heavy production that still allows room for organic touches (blazing horns, stinging brass, twanging guitars). The quality of the songs is high, and most are kept in-house, so they match his persona well. Besides Future Cut, Tom Jones also gets help on a pair of tracks from two other great producers: Betty Wright and Nellee Hooper. The latter appears on "Sugar Daddy," an excellent song written for Jones by Bono and the Edge, and it also features both of them playing on the track. Best of all, Jones' voice is still strong, only rarely betraying his 68 years on the planet. © John Bush /TiVo
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Tom

Pop - Released April 1, 1970 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Tom continued Tom Jones' turn-of-the-decade winning streak, climbing to number six on the album charts. However, the album wasn't as strong as his previous studio collection, This Is Tom Jones, featuring a set of R&B covers ("I Can't Turn You Loose," "I Thank You," "Proud Mary") and pop confections ("Sugar, Sugar") that were too bombastic to be enjoyable. However, when Jones delivered ballads like "The Impossible Dream" or the hit "Without Love," the record kicked into high gear, as his delivery matched the material as well as the arrangements. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo