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Classical - Released November 9, 2018 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Górecki wrote his Third Symphony in 1976, but it only came onto the market in 1992. It made its entrance with so much fanfare that it has overshadowed all of his other work. And this other work, by and large, belongs in a rather different category, one of much more avant-garde and revolutionary material: a category of music that many fans of the Symphony would not be so quick to dive into. The First Quartet, written in 1988, and the Second from 1991 both belong to the same modernist movement. However, the composer, who had matured over the years, also clearly softened his style. We only need to compare these quartets with Elementi Op. 19 No. 1 from 1966, which also appears on this album, to see how far he came: it is a piece of the purest contemporary avant-gardism. It is very possible that the minimalists, the "tintinnabulists" and even Shostakovitch – or indeed Bartók! – all left a mark on his writing from his later peiods. The Tippett Quartet are every bit as comfortable with this material as they are with Beethoven and perform the work with considerable skill. © SM/Qobuz

Chamber Music - Released August 17, 2018 | VIVAT

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Quartets - Released February 17, 2017 | SOMM Recordings

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released May 18, 2018 | SOMM Recordings

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Classical - Released August 5, 2014 | Naxos

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Polish composers Andrzej Panufnik (father of Roxanna) and Witold Lutoslawski were near contemporaries, but the string quartets of Panufnik here (and much of his other music besides) follow that of Lutoslawski chronologically as well as stylistically. The three quartets by Panufnik and the single example by Lutoslawski here share a reflective, deliberate mood and several principles of organization: a nonserial, but pitch-collection-oriented, tonal world; extreme yet subtly handled textures; and aspects of aleatoric (chance) procedure, controlled as to its overall effect but imparting a kind of instrumental freedom. The program makes sense, but it's hard to escape the feeling that Lutoslawski does it better: the dry structural organization of the Panufnik quartets doesn't quite fit with the extramusical content like the rhythm of wind in telegraph wires. The Tippett Quartet is very much in its element here, though, and it is likely that these rather underexposed works will find an audience among those interested in the consistently strong Polish contemporary scene of the later 20th century.

Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Naxos

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