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Ambient - Released January 31, 2020 | Kscope

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Before Moroder, Jarre and Kraftwerk, there was Tangerine Dream. Started in 1967 as an experimental rock band by German Edgar Froese, Tangerine Dream became the first big electronic music group, and a cult name for amateurs of psychedelic music - leading the renowned rock critic Lester Bangs to say “I saw God and/or Tangerine Dream” in a legendary article detailing one of their concerts in 1977 New York. Signed by Virgin in 1974 when the New Age was in full swing, TD introduced synths and sequencers on successful albums such as Phaedra and Stratosfear. But since 2015, the group has been without its creator, who recorded his last song, Zero Gravity, with Jean-Michel Jarre for the album Electronica 1: The Time Machine. The remaining trio, Thorsten Quaeschning (keyboards, drums, vocals, guitar), Hoshiko Yamane (violin, cello) and Ulrich Schnauss (keyboards, piano) decided to pursue Froese’s vision, who’s final idea consisted of combining quantum physics and music, resulting in the 2017 album Quantum Gate, partly based on his last recordings. For Recurring Dreams, the concept is the same, but is applied to older recordings from the band, from every era and with “every generation of synthesiser and sequencer” along with some new arrangements. The album has tracks from the 70s (Sequent C, Phaedra), the 80s (Tangram, Horizon, Yellowstone Park) and the 90s (The Claymore Mine / Stalking), a compilation of cosmic classics which should delight even the most sceptical of fans. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

Fans generally acknowledge the classic era of Tangerine Dream as coinciding with their Virgin years, which this collection rounds up nicely, opening with two landmarks, Phaedra and Rubycon, then including the group's broadening of scope and direction with the live Ricochet, Stratosfear, and Cyclone. This was directly after the early avant-garde years, consisting of experimental, arrhythmic work like Atem and Electronic Meditation, and before the Hollywood years, when Edgar Froese and co. began composing work for movie scores like Risky Business. Phaedra and Rubycon have not dated at all since their early-‘70s recording, despite Froese, Peter Baumann, and Chris Franke’s early adoption of Moog technology, along with Mellotron and other electric or electronic instruments. Along with the full LPs in their most recent remastering, the collection also rounds up single edits and 7” versions when they were originally available. ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released April 20, 2018 | Kscope

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New Age - Released September 8, 2015 | Cleopatra Records

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Progressive Rock - Released August 29, 2011 | Esoteric Recordings

Featuring shorter compositions and an increasingly lyrical lexicon of electronic sounds, Le Parc has more in common with the burgeoning new age movement than Tangerine Dream's earlier, eerier work. The songs are essentially musical postcards from great parks around the world, though the focus is on the mood generated by these places rather than a literal translation of geographic qualities. Thus, "Yellowstone Park" is rendered with an American Indian spirituality, "Zen Garden" is peaceful and mysterious, "Central Park" highly stylized and danceable. Tangerine Dream's music in recent years had shifted toward more accessible and melodic arrangements, so coming from the vantage point of a Phaedra or Stratosfear, the music on Le Parc could be viewed as a considerable "dumbing down" of their artistic origins. Part of Tangerine Dream's earlier appeal was their ability to evoke images in a language alien to the average listener; by adopting contemporary and relatively common sounds for these arrangements, some of their appeal is lost. The band is still capable of delivering engaging electronic music, but Le Parc operates on a more immediate level that values quick gratification over introspective study. That's not to suggest that listeners won't enjoy this record -- the warmly remembered "Tiergarten" is well worth hearing, for example -- but it operates on a superficial level that longtime fans may find slightly distasteful. ~ Dave Connolly
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Ambient - Released February 26, 2013 | Purple Pyramid Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1995 | Virgin Records

Phaedra is one of the most important, artistic, and exciting works in the history of electronic music, a brilliant and compelling summation of Tangerine Dream's early avant-space direction balanced with the synthesizer/sequencer technology just beginning to gain a foothold in nonacademic circles. The result is best heard on the 15-minute title track, unparalleled before or since for its depth of sound and vision. Given focus by the arpeggiated trance that drifts in and out of the mix, the track progresses through several passages including a few surprisingly melodic keyboard lines and an assortment of eerie Moog and Mellotron effects, gaseous explosions, and windy sirens. Despite the impending chaos, the track sounds more like a carefully composed classical work than an unrestrained piece of noise. While the title track takes the cake, there are three other excellent tracks on Phaedra. "Mysterious Semblance at the Strand of Nightmares" is a solo Edgar Froese song that uses some surprisingly emotive and affecting synthesizer washes, and "Movements of a Visionary" is a more experimental piece, using treated voices and whispers to drive its hypnotic arpeggios. Perhaps even more powerful as a musical landmark now than when it was first recorded, Phaedra has proven the test of time. ~ John Bush
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Ambient - Released September 29, 2017 | Kscope

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Conceived in 2014 when Edgar Froese joined forces with Thorsten Quaeschning, Ulrich Schnauss, and Hoshiko Yamane to create new Tangerine Dream music and give it a modern interpretation of their classic sound, the album was put on hold after Froese died the following year. The remaining three members, alongside Froese's wife, Bianca Froese-Acquaye, continued with Froese's original idea and finished Quantum Gate in just the way he'd intended. ~ Rich Wilson
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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric Recordings

Underwater Sunlight was the first album Paul Haslinger recorded with Tangerine Dream and his presence is immediately felt. With Haslinger, the group relied more heavily on strict structures and jarring compositional flourishes, which is only appropriate, since he came directly from a classical background. The group hadn't quite figured out how to fully incorporate these techniques into their music, but the results on Underwater are nevertheless fascinating. ~ Rodney Batdorf
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Ambient - Released September 10, 2013 | Purple Pyramid Records

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Classical - Released November 9, 1992 | Private Music

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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric Recordings

Electronic Meditation, Tangerine Dream's debut album, features the lineup of Edgar Froese, Conrad Schnitzler, and Klaus Schulze (his only album with Tangerine Dream). The album is not without its flaws, but it's strong in many ways and shows abundant promise. Wildly experimental timbres, passages, and textures dominate this sound world. Bringing a rock & roll effort to a decidedly avant-garde sound, the album manages to be very accessible and hard to dislike. Of those who were working at the same time, Electronic Meditation is most similar to the music of Pink Floyd and Amon Düül. ~ Jim Brenholts
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Progressive Rock - Released August 29, 2011 | Esoteric Recordings

TD's purest expression of "space music," this double album ebbs and flows effortlessly from one tone cluster to another. Almost classical in construction, the music is structured so as to evolve in sections as one theme literally melts into the next. Florian Fricke (of Popol Vuh) played the big Moog on this album and the overall texture of the electronics is warm and shimmering. ~ Archie Patterson
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1977 | Geffen*

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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric Recordings

As if the sound is breaking through your speakers, Alpha Centauri begins its journey. Crackling and swirling synthesizers seize control of your stereo. Like a call to psychedelic arms, the first track "Sunrise in the Third System" marches on with its organ. The mixing of the three tracks found on Alpha Centauri leaves something to be desired, in that the tracks are not mixed the way they would be today with each track endlessly flowing into the next like a stream. Nonetheless, when one is not paying too close attention to such details, the album seems to flow quite smoothly. The sound is not of the highest standards either, as should be expected, this being a 1971 release of "space music." Tangerine Dream's style of "space music" had not yet been refined and revolutionized as it was a couple of releases later with Phaedra and Rubycon. Regardless, for those interested in a wilder and more reckless ride on the "space music" autobahn, Alpha Centauri should satisfy the need. ~ Michael G. Breece
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Ambient - Released November 13, 2012 | Purple Pyramid Records

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Progressive Rock - Released November 1, 2019 | Esoteric

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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric Recordings

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Ambient - Released January 1, 2008 | Purple Pyramid Records

Fans of mid-'70s era Tangerine Dream will more than likely be excited by this double-disc offering of new material issued by Cleopatra. Essentially, Edgar Froese, the only original member of the group, went back into the storage closet and hauled out a few tons of vintage gear: sequencers, analog synths, primitive drum machines, and assorted keyboards to revisit the sound of past albums like Stratosfear, Phaedra, and Rubycon. That said, there are, of course, vestiges of the band's current sound as well -- the one that has appeared on innumerable new age and soundtrack recordings and scored them some Grammy nominations. While by no means suggesting that Booster is on the same artistic par as the classic recordings, its sense of drama and tension and its spacious time-sequenced modalities make for the most engaging listen to TD in years. ~ Thom Jurek