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Electronic/Dance - Released March 22, 2019 | Friends Of Friends

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 6, 2015 | True Panther Sounds

Henry Laufer, better known as Shlohmo, has been a mainstay of the Los Angeles beatmaking scene since co-founding the WeDidIt collective in 2008 along with like-minded artists such as D33J, RL Grime, Ryan Hemsworth, and Groundislava. His early releases, mostly on the Los Angeles-based label Friends of Friends, established his abstract hip-hop sound, but his proper debut full-length, 2011's Bad Vibes, signaled a shift toward darkness, with song titles such as "I Can't See You, I'm Dead" and "Trapped in a Burning House." Dark Red, Shlohmo's first album for True Panther Sounds, fully explores the dark themes that were already clearly present on his previous album, even going so far as to feature stark black artwork and Burzum-inspired calligraphy, almost resembling a release on Blackest Ever Black or Hospital Productions. The song titles (including "Slow Descent," "Buried," and "Remains") similarly evoke death, despair, and bleakness. As gloomy as this album seems, it's very creative in its usage of dark sounds and imagery, and doesn't come off nearly as depressing as it might initially seem. Upon the album's release, Shlohmo established a touring group consisting of fellow WeDidIt crew members, and the album has much more of a live band feel than his previous works, resembling dark, cinematic post-rock. The distorted guitars tip toward doom metal, but aren't overbearing enough to drown out the beats or synth melodies. On several tracks, Shlohmo impressively plays with slow/fast dynamics, burying frantic jungle breaks underneath the dark atmospherics of "Meet Ur Maker" and "Ditch," and bringing them front and center in "Fading." Eerie voices abound, reminiscent of Tri Angle artists such as Holy Other and Forest Swords, and the sounds of broken glass are utilized as percussive elements in "Relentless" and "Remains," lending to more of a spooky fun house feel than anything genuinely terrifying. On album-closer "Beams," Shlohmo goes for widescreen emotion, combining trap percussion and choppy drum'n'bass breakbeats with chiming victory-lap melodies, creating something that sounds nothing short of triumphant. The resulting album successfully fleshes out Shlohmo's previous sound into his most accomplished work so far, and ultimately manages to find hope in darkness. ~ Paul Simpson

Electronic/Dance - Released November 11, 2016 | Friends Of Friends

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 9, 2011 | Friends Of Friends

Bad Vibes is the debut album from 19-year-old Los Angeles native Henry Laufer, an alumnus of the same school of experimental, instrumental hip-hop that produced Flying Lotus and Nosaj Thing. Dropping out of college to focus entirely on music, the young beatmaker spent a whole year crafting this smooth, laid-back, psychedelic, and sometimes melancholy record full of crispy beats, chiming percussion, and warm, swelling chords. ~ John D. Buchanan
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Electronic/Dance - Released February 27, 2019 | Friends Of Friends

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 11, 2016 | Friends Of Friends

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Electronic/Dance - Released December 25, 2015 | True Panther Sounds

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 30, 2019 | Friends Of Friends

Four years following career highlight Dark Red, Shlohmo returned with the ominously titled The End. Even grimmer than its predecessor and no less brilliant, The End is a gloomy, apocalyptic record which sounds like it's trying to break out from underneath the wreckage of civilization. While Shlohmo has always recorded his music at home to cassette tapes, this album feels even messier and smudgier than his earlier work, filled with disorienting pitchshifting and tape mangling. Yet somehow the production itself is clean and dynamic, with heavy bass and more of an attack to the higher ranges. Shlohmo acknowledged metal as an influence on Dark Red, but the guitars on The End are much heavier and doomier, particularly on tracks like the stinging "Headache of the Year." One of the album's early highlights is "Hopeless," a glorious bummer filled with heartsick sighing, piercing mike feedback, and darkwave beats which break down and slow to a crawl. "Eating Away" has even gnarlier tape manipulation, incorporating what sounds like a circuit-bent Speak-N-Spell. "We Sat in the Car" seems to have a bizarre animal sound chirping away throughout its clanging, flickering sonic detritus. "Panic Attack" brings back some of the submerged drum'n'bass breakbeats of Dark Red, combined with double-time juke beats and murky, Boards of Canada-esque melodies. The chopped, disembodied voices of "The Best of Me" and the Burial-like "By Myself" conjure up a host of fragmented memories, all jumbled together in a sort of foggy mind-haze. With each successive work, Shlohmo continues to make music which makes it seem like he's unraveling, yet his vision is somehow clearer than ever. Much like Dark Red, The End is emotionally devastating, but instead of being a depressing slog, it's positively awe-inspiring. ~ Paul Simpson

Electronic/Dance - Released September 21, 2018 | Friends Of Friends

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