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Dance - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

Robyn's prolific 2010 culminated with Body Talk, the full-length album that featured songs from the Body Talk, Pt. 1 and Pt. 2 EPs, plus enough new songs to make up a third EP. Releasing that much new music within six months was a feat in and of itself, but the fact that each part of Body Talk was so consistent made the whole project even more impressive. And, by revealing bits and pieces of what went into the final album -- as well as parts that didn’t -- Robyn offered her fans a window into her process, allowing glimpses of the moods and approaches that go into making an album and letting listeners get to know these songs in different contexts. Of course, Body Talk's appeal isn’t just experimental: by picking the best of the project’s songs, it feels like a greatest-hits collection and brand-new album rolled into one. Familiarity suits these songs well, whether it's the tight, bright "Fembot," the aching "Dancing on My Own," or "Hang with Me," which swoons with arpeggios that sound like falling recklessly in love, even though that's just what Robyn warns against. Hearing the songs from the EPs on Body Talk makes Body Talk, Pt. 1 and Pt. 2 feel like deluxe singles from the album, as well as its building blocks. However, different versions of these tracks, like the more anthemic take on "In My Eyes," ensure that the album doesn’t feel cobbled together. Some songs sound even better here than they did on the EPs: "Love Kills" and "None of Dem'"s playful dancehall function more clearly as bridges to other tracks than they did before. Body Talk's new songs also make good on the EPs' gradual shift from fierce independence to togetherness, particularly on "Call Your Girlfriend," a thoughtful twist on a love triangle that finds Robyn enjoying new love while being concerned for someone hurt by it, and "Stars 4-Ever," which gives a fizzy, Euro-dance tinged happy ending to the Body Talk project. After the EPs' conciseness, the album feels downright roomy, and maybe slightly too long; obviously, Robyn had a lot of songs to work with. Overall, though, Body Talk is more focused than Robyn, and just as bold in the intimacy it creates with listeners. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Dance - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

Robyn's 2005 self-titled album showed that when she was free to do whatever she wanted, she could do just about anything. However, it took a while for Robyn to reach all of her listeners -- the U.S. had to wait until 2008 to discover it was a modern pop classic -- and during that time, she amassed enough songs to fill three mini-albums. Since she doesn’t have to prove what she can do in the confines of one release, Body Talk, Pt. 1 is a more focused listen than Robyn was. At eight songs long, it’s also leaner, and a little meaner: Robyn sounds more frustrated and assertive than ever on “Don’t Fucking Tell Me What to Do,” a hard-edged dance track topped by a litany of everything that’s killing her: her shoes, her diet, her manager, her label. The words and tension are so dense that there’s no room for any musical embellishment besides stark beats and synths, and it’s not till the song is almost finished that Robyn finally lashes out with the song’s titular chorus. She’s not afraid to brag on the dancehall-tinged “None of Dem” and Diplo-produced “Dance Hall Queen,” but her boasts are more tempered than Robyn's taunts. Instead, she shows that she’s as independent as ever in different ways -- most often by displaying her vulnerability. As revved-up as Robyn sounds on “Fembot,” there’s a sensitive undercurrent behind Klas Åhlund's whiz-bang production, and though “Cry When You Get Older”’s melody is pure bubblegum simplicity, Robyn's advice to boys and girls (“love hurts when you do it right”) is anything but. She can also capture the heartache of a fiercely independent woman like few others, and “Dancing on My Own”'s wounded strength and soaring melody make it Body Talk, Pt. 1's “With Every Heartbeat.” The album takes a much more intimate turn as it closes, with the acoustic version of “Hang with Me” finding a unique perspective on being “just friends”; the traditional Swedish song “Jag Vet en Dejlig Rosa” (I Know of a Lovely Rose) ends the album with Robyn singing of a faraway love with just a vibraphone accompanying her. Capturing the freedom and loneliness of independence, Body Talk, Pt. 1 is a concise set of songs on its own, and an impressive first third of the whole ambitious project. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Robyn declared her independence on Body Talk Pt. 1, but on the project's second volume, two's company. Trading hard-edged dance floor assaults for softer but still sleek sounds, she sings the praises of companionship and support and proves that stylish, cutting-edge pop doesn't have to be competitive or egotistical. This friendly vibe is apparent from the beginning of "In My Eyes," which opens Body Talk Pt. 2 with a sweet, and catchy, message of reassurance to misfits and outsiders. Bookended by Robyn's assurances that "It's gonna be OK!," it couldn't be more different than "Don't Fucking Tell Me What to Do," Body Talk Pt. 1's opening salvo. Even on more kinetic tracks like "Include Me Out" and "We Dance to the Beat," it's all about sharing the groove, not dancing on one's own. Speaking of which, Pt. 2's single "Hang With Me" is just as good as "Dancing on My Own." It appeared on Pt. 1 as a somber yet hopeful acoustic ballad, but here she gives it the full Robyn treatment, with longtime producer Klas Ahlund transforming it into emotionally complex pop that rivals Robyn's "Be Mine!" Meanwhile, the acoustic "Indestructible" and "Love Kills" reflect the downside of needing someone, whether it's reaching beyond past hurts for new love or dealing with a breakup's immediate aftermath. Hip-hop tinged tracks featuring Diplo ("Criminal Intent") and Snoop Dogg (the exuberant "U Should Know Better") help maintain the mini-album's connection with Body Talk Pt. 1 while maintaining the set's own identity. Two thirds of the way through the Body Talk project, it's clear that this experiment is reaping rich rewards for Robyn and her listeners. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Dance - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

"Reprising both the cleverest and most volatile cuts from her recent EPs, she adds five new tracks that go for love's jugular." © TiVo
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Dance - Released October 30, 2002 | Konichiwa Records LLP

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Electronic - Released July 15, 2016 | Konichiwa Records

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Dance - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

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Dance - Released November 6, 2020 | KRUNK

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Dance - Released August 23, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Electronic - Released August 26, 2016 | Konichiwa Records

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Electronic - Released July 1, 2016 | Konichiwa Records

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Dance - Released August 9, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Dance - Released September 4, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Dance - Released September 20, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Dance - Released January 1, 2011 | Interscope

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Dance - Released July 17, 2020 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Dance - Released November 6, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Dance - Released July 17, 2020 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Dance - Released October 4, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Electronic - Released September 29, 2017 | Konichiwa Records LLP

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Robyn in the magazine
  • Joyfully Depressed
    Joyfully Depressed In 1994, Swedish singer Robyn, a teenager at the time, shook up the world of pop with hit songs like Do You Really Want Me and Do You Know (What It Takes).