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Pop - Released October 26, 2018 | Cherrytree Records - Kierszenbaum 33%

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Pop/Rock - Released June 24, 1997 | RCA Records Label

Robyn's debut album, Robyn Is Here, isn't particularly deep, but it is well-executed European dance-pop. The Swedish teenager has an appealingly thin voice, and her producers and songwriters have a knack for crafting hooky dance-pop that sounds as if it was made in 1990, not 1997. Half of the album rides by on mediocre songs and first-rate production, but when Robyn is given a good song -- as on "Show Me Love" and the dynamite "Do You Know (What It Takes)" -- Robyn Is Here is as good as mainstream dance-pop gets. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Interscope

"I present to you/Unleashed in the East/Best dressed in the West/Sorted in the North/Without a doubt in the South/the queen of queen bees," intones the booming voice on Robyn's opening track, "Curriculum Vitae." It's not bragging if you can back it up, and Robyn does just that, channeling all the frustration of her creative differences with her previous labels into a freewheeling, accomplished pop album that is so fresh that it could pass for a debut -- and, as the first release for her own label, Konichiwa Records, it is a debut of sorts. Robyn feels like she crammed everything she couldn't do before into a space that can barely contain it, starting with "Konichiwa Bitches," a sassy hip-pop manifesto with a title that could very well have been the first thing she said to her old bosses once she got her own label set up. On this song and the rest of the album, Robyn sounds equally empowered and irresistible, and doesn't hesitate to tell off labels, trifling boys, or anyone else who stands in the way of what she wants. She doesn't mince words on "Handle Me," but she purrs "you're a selfish, narcissistic, psycho-freakin', boot-lickin' creep" so sweetly that it stings even more. And even on the songs where she isn't so strong, like "Bum Like You" and "I Should Have Known"'s catchy recriminations, she's never the less than self-aware. She has a few words for the ladies as well: the cautionary tale "Crash and Burn Girl" is one of the album's funkiest tracks. "Who's That Girl," the song that her old label didn't want to release, and sparked her emancipation from them, is also here, and its distinctive skipping, tropics-go-Nordic rhythms and aggressively buzzy synths -- courtesy of the Knife -- sound great, but it isn't even the best song here. That honor goes to one of two songs that really hit home that true independence can be the hardest thing. "Be Mine!" nails the complicated, sad yet liberated feelings surrounding an impossible relationship, celebrating "the sweet pain of watching your back as you walk away" as it propels itself on a buoyant rhythm. "With Every Heartbeat," the epic, Kleerup-produced breakup song that was Robyn's breakthrough single in the U.K., pushes her forward on percolating, escalating synths and strings until it peaks with the chorus echoing all around her. Not every independent moment on Robyn is so lonely, however. The way the album moves from whimsical tracks like the Teddybears cover "Cobrastyle" or "Robotboy" to subtle ballads like "Eclipse" and "Any Time You Like" just emphasizes that this album is a space for expression for and by Robyn. And like any self-titled album should, Robyn defines what she's all about. Even if it took a few years to put together the label and album (and a few more to get the album released everywhere), this is the pop tour de force that Robyn has always had in her. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 26, 2006 | Interscope

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Pop - Released October 26, 2018 | Cherrytree Records - Kierszenbaum 33%

In much the same way she reinvented herself in the 2000s by forming her own label and crafting bright yet bittersweet electropop that provided the blueprint for generations of artists to come, Robyn's return with Honey is more of a metamorphosis than a comeback. Following 2010's triumphant Body Talk, she experienced seismic changes in her life: her longtime friend and collaborator, producer Christian Falk, died from pancreatic cancer in 2014, and she separated from her partner, photographer Max Vitali (the pair later reunited). Her grief and recovery were so profound that the precise structures and sharp hooks of Robyn and Body Talk couldn't contain her emotions, so Robyn dissolves them on Honey, allowing her to engage on a more vulnerable level that spotlights her gift for making music that's joyous and heartbroken at the same time. "Missing U" is both of these things, capturing both the sweetness of being together and the pain of being apart in its sparkling synths and irrepressible beat. It bridges her previous work and the rest of Honey's flowing tracks, which draw on the things that gave her the strength to recover. Dancing has always been a major part of her music, and along with years of therapy, immersing herself in clubs helped her reconnect to herself. The album's most kinetic tracks reflect her healing process: on the remarkable "Human Being," she mingles her grief and need for intimacy with gentle synths and a rocking beat that cocoon her as she sings "baby, don't give up on me now." "Because It's in the Music" borrows some slow-motion disco stardust as it strikes a tone somewhere between comfort and ecstacy, while "Between the Lines"' pulsing house adds playful, flirtatious energy. Here and throughout Honey, there's a sensuality to Robyn's music that feels new and welcome. She delivers her own style of sexual healing on the masterful title track, describing it as something nourishing beyond mere pleasure. "Baby Forgive Me" is both soft and daring; though she risks it all by asking to be taken back, she asks so sweetly that it's almost impossible to say no. Perhaps as a tribute to her connection with Falk, Robyn made Honey with other close friends. Along with Klas Åhlund, her collaborator since the Robyn days, the album features lush, expressionistic tracks produced by Kindness' Adam Bainbridge ("Send to Robin Immediately") and Mr. Tophat ("Beach 2K20"). However, her main creative partner is Metronomy's Joseph Mount, who contributed to over half the album and brings a crisp synth-pop edge to "Ever Again," which finds a stronger, wiser Robyn promising herself to never be this devastated again. The eight years between Body Talk and this album would be a lifetime for almost any artist, and several lifetimes for a female pop star, whose career longevity isn't usually measured in decades. However, Robyn continues to make the trends instead of following them, and with Honey, she enters her forties with some of her most emotionally satisfying and musically innovative music. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Interscope

"I present to you/Unleashed in the East/Best dressed in the West/Sorted in the North/Without a doubt in the South/the queen of queen bees," intones the booming voice on Robyn's opening track, "Curriculum Vitae." It's not bragging if you can back it up, and Robyn does just that, channeling all the frustration of her creative differences with her previous labels into a freewheeling, accomplished pop album that is so fresh that it could pass for a debut -- and, as the first release for her own label, Konichiwa Records, it is a debut of sorts. Robyn feels like she crammed everything she couldn't do before into a space that can barely contain it, starting with "Konichiwa Bitches," a sassy hip-pop manifesto with a title that could very well have been the first thing she said to her old bosses once she got her own label set up. On this song and the rest of the album, Robyn sounds equally empowered and irresistible, and doesn't hesitate to tell off labels, trifling boys, or anyone else who stands in the way of what she wants. She doesn't mince words on "Handle Me," but she purrs "you're a selfish, narcissistic, psycho-freakin', boot-lickin' creep" so sweetly that it stings even more. And even on the songs where she isn't so strong, like "Bum Like You" and "I Should Have Known"'s catchy recriminations, she's never the less than self-aware. She has a few words for the ladies as well: the cautionary tale "Crash and Burn Girl" is one of the album's funkiest tracks. "Who's That Girl," the song that her old label didn't want to release, and sparked her emancipation from them, is also here, and its distinctive skipping, tropics-go-Nordic rhythms and aggressively buzzy synths -- courtesy of the Knife -- sound great, but it isn't even the best song here. That honor goes to one of two songs that really hit home that true independence can be the hardest thing. "Be Mine!" nails the complicated, sad yet liberated feelings surrounding an impossible relationship, celebrating "the sweet pain of watching your back as you walk away" as it propels itself on a buoyant rhythm. "With Every Heartbeat," the epic, Kleerup-produced breakup song that was Robyn's breakthrough single in the U.K., pushes her forward on percolating, escalating synths and strings until it peaks with the chorus echoing all around her. Not every independent moment on Robyn is so lonely, however. The way the album moves from whimsical tracks like the Teddybears cover "Cobrastyle" or "Robotboy" to subtle ballads like "Eclipse" and "Any Time You Like" just emphasizes that this album is a space for expression for and by Robyn. And like any self-titled album should, Robyn defines what she's all about. Even if it took a few years to put together the label and album (and a few more to get the album released everywhere), this is the pop tour de force that Robyn has always had in her. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 16, 1999 | RCA - Ricochet

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Pop - Released October 26, 2018 | Cherrytree Records - Kierszenbaum 33%

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Pop - Released April 19, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Pop - Released June 17, 2020 | Cherrytree Records - Kierszenbaum 33%

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Pop - Released June 17, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Pop - Released November 22, 2019 | Robyn Marriott

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Pop - Released September 26, 2018 | Cherrytree Records - Kierszenbaum 33%

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Interscope

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Rock - Released March 27, 2017 | Cleopatra Records

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Pop - Released June 17, 2020 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Pop - Released July 3, 2020 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Pop - Released May 31, 2019 | Konichiwa Records - Interscope Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | BOMAR RECORDS

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Robyn in the magazine
  • Joyfully Depressed
    Joyfully Depressed In 1994, Swedish singer Robyn, a teenager at the time, shook up the world of pop with hit songs like Do You Really Want Me and Do You Know (What It Takes).