Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$25.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 1981 | Rhino

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Ian Curtis had only been buried for one year before the surviving members of Joy Division returned to the studio, dried their tears and attempted making music again. Out of the still reddened ashes of the most emblematic post-punk group, New Order was born. A newcomer Gillian Gilbert was on keys. The guitarist Bernard Sumner donned the captain’s armband. And Martin Hannett, Joy Division’s producer, was again behind the controls. Recorded between the 24th of April and 4th of May 1981 and released on the 11th of November of the same year on Factory Records, the band’s first album is an impeccable transition of which time makes it only more impressive. The rigidity and coldness of Joy Division’s anthracite rock remains at the heart of the compositions. Sharp rhythms and clear guitars with depressive, sickly groans like a zombie on its last legs, Movement contains, however, beginnings of a sound atypical from the young Mancunians that never smile. We are still far from the electronic new wave and dance that New Order demonstrate on their subsequent album, but the role of keys and synths here shows beginnings of a new path for the band. This 2019 Definitive edition offers, in addition to a stellar remastering, 18 demos and alternative mixes. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
CD$25.49

Pop - Released September 30, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

Now that Waiting for the Sirens' Call has been officially declared part of New Order's history, only eight months after release, it's time once again to reassess the group in the form of a mostly redundant compilation. Rhino calls Singles the group's "first ever career-spanning two-disc retrospective," but it's more like the group's first compilation to contain tracks from Sirens' Call. Besides, 1987's Substance spanned the group's career upon release and remains the basis for most New Order compilations (this one included), so it's no big deal. Just as importantly, over a third of the contents date from 1993 onward; that's too high a percentage to make the set an ideal introduction. Considering its title, Singles has a clear-cut purpose, unlike 2002's International. Then again, each of the 14 tracks contained on International are also here -- what amounts to an inferior version of Substance with some crucial tracks squeezed out in favor of lesser, later singles. A proper sequel to Substance, covering Technique through Sirens' Call, would've made more sense, but the lure in dressing up a combination of oft-recycled classics with slightly varying surroundings has yet to lose its appeal. Substance remains, and will likely always remain, the release to get you started. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
CD$18.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 17, 1987 | Rhino

Born out of the ashes of Joy Division in the early 1980s, New Order symbolises one of the first truly successful unions between rock’n’roll and dance music. The darkest Mancunian band of the punk era who had transformed into masters of the dancefloor signed the perfect soundtrack to the gloomy England under Thatcher. Released in the summer of 1987 on the label Factory, Substance brings together all their various styles and singles like the hits Blue Monday, Ceremony, Confusion, The Perfect Kiss or Bizarre Love Triangle. This was obviously the golden age for the quartet made up of Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, Gillian Gilbert and Stephen Morris. Despite a few highlights (such as the album Technique in 1989), New Order never really reached this level of composition again... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 16, 1999 | WM UK

Hi-Res
In his 2016 autobiography Substance: Inside New Order, Peter Hook writes: “I’ve often said that the magic of New Order was all that push-and-pull between the rock and electronic sides of the music, the yin and yang of Barney [Sumner] and me.” Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order’s second studio album released in May 1983, confirms this comment and features an even more electronic sound. With its famous cover art that depicts a reworking by graphic designer Peter Saville of 19th century French painter Henri Fantin-Latour’s Un panier de roses (A basket of roses), the record alternates between innovative electro-pop (5-6-8) and synthetic cold wave (Your Silent Face), but also more classic post-punk (Age of Consent). What’s more, Sumner’s vocals are his own and the influence of Ian Curtis is a distant memory. With Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order fused the influences of Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder to give birth to their own unstoppable compositions, cornerstones for the British electronic pop of that era. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released July 12, 2019 | Mute

Hi-Res
In 1978, Joy Division made their first TV appearance in the former Manchester Granada studios on Tony Wilson’s show, So It Goes. In the summer of 2017, New Order (aka Joy Division Mark II) returned to the scene of the crime for 5 concerts, with ∑(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So It Goes… being their 13th July performance. Despite not being particularly renowned for their on-stage performances, they still continue to regularly release live albums. After BBC Radio 1 Live in Concert in 1992, Live at the London Troxy in 2011, Live at Bestival 2012 in 2013 and NOMC15 in 2017, Bernard Sumner’s band conceived this show with artist Liam Gillick, who is normally better suited to the Tate Modern than to concert halls. Some tracks have even been reworked with the help of composer Joe Duddell and a 12-strong synthesizer ensemble.But one thing that fans will be particularly pleased by is the set list. Songs now seldom performed by the Mancunian group (such as Times Change from Republic, Vanishing Point from Technique, Ultraviolence from Power, Corruption and Lies and Plastic from Music Complete) as well as four Joy Division tracks (In a Lonely Place, Decades, Heart & Soul and Disorder, songs which haven’t been played live in 30 years!) make for a very special record. Without resting on their laurels, the quintet consisting of the original line-up (Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert) along with later additions (Phil Cunningham and Tom Chapman) perform completely reworked versions of their hits from the last century, proving that they most certainly still have things left to say. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 12, 1999 | WM UK

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 20, 1989 | Rhino

Tastes and sounds were changing quickly in the late '80s, which prompted New Order's most startling transformation yet -- from moody dance-rockers to, well, moody acid-house mavens. After the band booked a studio on the island hotspot of Ibiza, apparently not knowing that it was the center of the burgeoning house music craze, New Order's sure instincts for blending rock and contemporary dance resulted in another confident, superb LP. Technique was the group's most striking production job, with the single "Fine Time" proving a close runner-up to "Blue Monday" as the most extroverted dance track in the band's catalog. Opening the record, it was a portrait of a group unrecognizable from its origins, delivering lascivious and extroverted come-ons amid pounding beats. It appeared that dance had fully taken over from rock, with the guitars and bass only brought in for a quick solo or bridge. But while pure dance was the case for the singles "Fine Time" and "Round & Round," elsewhere New Order were still delivering some of the best alternative pop around, plaintive and affecting songs like "Run" (the third single), "Love Less," and "Dream Attack." Placed in the perfect position to deliver the definitive alternative take on house music, the band produced another classic record. © John Bush /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 14, 2000 | WM UK

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 27, 1993 | WM UK

Hi-Res
Pulling back slightly from the raw, dance-oriented Technique, New Order took a break for four years and then crafted another slice of prime guitar pop. In keeping with previous work, Republic simply borrows elements of contemporary innovations in club music to frame a set of effortlessly enjoyable alternative pop songs. As on Technique, the singles ("World," "Spooky") are the most danceable on the record, while lyrical concerns are among the most direct of the group's career, including "Ruined in a Day" and "Times Change," sure signs of the demise of Factory Records. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 1, 1985 | Rhino

In his 2016 autobiography Substance: Inside New Order, Peter Hook writes: “I’ve often said that the magic of New Order was all that push-and-pull between the rock and electronic sides of the music, the yin and yang of Barney [Sumner] and me.” Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order’s second studio album released in May 1983, confirms this comment and features an even more electronic sound. With its famous cover art that depicts a reworking by graphic designer Peter Saville of 19th century French painter Henri Fantin-Latour’s Un panier de roses (A basket of roses), the record alternates between innovative electro-pop (5-6-8) and synthetic cold wave (Your Silent Face), but also more classic post-punk (Age of Consent). What’s more, Sumner’s vocals are his own and the influence of Ian Curtis is a distant memory. With Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order fused the influences of Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder to give birth to their own unstoppable compositions, cornerstones for the British electronic pop of that era. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 14, 2000 | WM UK

Hi-Res
CD$15.49

Rock - Released June 3, 2011 | WM UK

Total: From Joy Division to New Order, issued by Rhino U.K. in 2011, is an unavoidably awkward attempt at distilling the output of two connected bands to a single disc. Should you happen to want the biggest hits and an assortment of highlights, this might do the trick: “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Blue Monday,” and “Bizarre Love Triangle” are all included. Both Joy Division and New Order released crucial studio albums and were the subjects of landmark singles compilations. This release drastically shortchanges their legacies. There is no point to the disc's existence, unless you factor the one previously unreleased outtake -- a weak one at that -- recorded by New Order in 2005. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
CD$31.99

Rock - Released June 3, 2011 | WM UK

Videos
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 1985 | Rhino

New Order's third LP, Low-life, was, in every way, the artistic equal of their breakout, 1983's Power, Corruption & Lies. The point where the band's fusion of rock and electronics became seamless, it showed the bandmembers having it every way they wanted: heavily sequenced and synthesized, but with bravura work from Bernard Sumner's guitar and Peter Hook's plaintive, melodic bass; filled with hummable pop songs, but still experimental as far as how the productions were achieved. The melodica-led pop song "Love Vigilantes" was the opener, nearly identical as a standout first track to "Age of Consent" from Power, Corruption & Lies. Next was "The Perfect Kiss," one of the first major New Order singles to appear on an album. (The band being newly signed to Warner Bros. in the United States, it made perfect sense to include such a sublime piece of dance-pop on the LP.) Even as more and more synth-heavy groups like Eurythmics and Pet Shop Boys began approaching New Order's expertise with the proper care of electronics in pop music, the band still sounded like none other. "This Time of Night" and "Elegia" evoked the dark, nocturnal mood of the album's title and artwork, but none could call them mopey when they pushed as hard as they did on "Sunrise." Only "Sub-Culture," tucked in at the end, has the feel of a lost opportunity; remixed for a single release, it became much better. But there was no mistaking that New Order had reached a peak, experimenting with their sound and their style, but keeping every moment wrapped in an unmistakable humanness. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released March 28, 2005 | Rhino

CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 15, 1986 | Rhino

New Order had been so good at integrating synth and guitars (often on the same song) that fans who greeted 1986's Brotherhood with the realization that it was split into a rock side and a dance side couldn't help but be a little disappointed. Still, the songs and the band's production had reached such a high level that the concept worked superbly, without calling undue attention to itself. The rock side comes first, revealing more of the emotional side of Bernard Sumner's singing and songwriting, even leading off with acoustic guitar for one song. But Brotherhood was also a little harder than what had come before; Sumner often sang with a come-on sort of brio, matching Peter Hook's seething work on the bass. The songwriting was excellent, and the album was delivered with great pacing, especially on the first four tracks -- sensuous and roiling for "Paradise," bright and emphatic on "Weirdo," reflective for "As It Is When It Was," then back to direct and upbeat on "Broken Promise." The synthesizer side was similarly assured, beginning with one of their brightest singles (and biggest transatlantic hits), "Bizarre Love Triangle." There was no dark side to Brotherhood, as there was with Low-life; after "Bizarre Love Triangle" came only the Middle Eastern fusion of "Angel Dust" and the simple, pastoral synth pop of "All Day Long" and "Every Little Counts." For better and worse, this was a New Order with nothing more to prove -- witness the tossed-off lyrics and giggles on "Every Little Counts" -- aside from continuing to make great music. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$15.49

Pop - Released September 29, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

New Order had been so good at integrating synth and guitars (often on the same song) that fans who greeted 1986's Brotherhood with the realization that it was split into a rock side and a dance side couldn't help but be a little disappointed. Still, the songs and the band's production had reached such a high level that the concept worked superbly, without calling undue attention to itself. The rock side comes first, revealing more of the emotional side of Bernard Sumner's singing and songwriting, even leading off with acoustic guitar for one song. But Brotherhood was also a little harder than what had come before; Sumner often sang with a come-on sort of brio, matching Peter Hook's seething work on the bass. The songwriting was excellent, and the album was delivered with great pacing, especially on the first four tracks -- sensuous and roiling for "Paradise," bright and emphatic on "Weirdo," reflective for "As It Is When It Was," then back to direct and upbeat on "Broken Promise." The synthesizer side was similarly assured, beginning with one of their brightest singles (and biggest transatlantic hits), "Bizarre Love Triangle." There was no dark side to Brotherhood, as there was with Low-life; after "Bizarre Love Triangle" came only the Middle Eastern fusion of "Angel Dust" and the simple, pastoral synth pop of "All Day Long" and "Every Little Counts." For better and worse, this was a New Order with nothing more to prove -- witness the tossed-off lyrics and giggles on "Every Little Counts" -- aside from continuing to make great music. © John Bush /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released May 12, 2016 | Mute

Hi-Res
CD$7.99

Rock - Released July 8, 2013 | Sunday Best Recordings

CD$15.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 21, 2005 | Warner Records