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Alternative & Indie - Released April 5, 2019 | Rhino

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Ian Curtis had only been buried for one year before the surviving members of Joy Division returned to the studio, dried their tears and attempted making music again. Out of the still reddened ashes of the most emblematic post-punk group, New Order was born. A newcomer Gillian Gilbert was on keys. The guitarist Bernard Sumner donned the captain’s armband. And Martin Hannett, Joy Division’s producer, was again behind the controls. Recorded between the 24th of April and 4th of May 1981 and released on the 11th of November of the same year on Factory Records, the band’s first album is an impeccable transition of which time makes it only more impressive. The rigidity and coldness of Joy Division’s anthracite rock remains at the heart of the compositions. Sharp rhythms and clear guitars with depressive, sickly groans like a zombie on its last legs, Movement contains, however, beginnings of a sound atypical from the young Mancunians that never smile. We are still far from the electronic new wave and dance that New Order demonstrate on their subsequent album, but the role of keys and synths here shows beginnings of a new path for the band. This 2019 Definitive edition offers, in addition to a stellar remastering, 18 demos and alternative mixes. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 9, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Now that Waiting for the Sirens' Call has been officially declared part of New Order's history, only eight months after release, it's time once again to reassess the group in the form of a mostly redundant compilation. Rhino calls Singles the group's "first ever career-spanning two-disc retrospective," but it's more like the group's first compilation to contain tracks from Sirens' Call. Besides, 1987's Substance spanned the group's career upon release and remains the basis for most New Order compilations (this one included), so it's no big deal. Just as importantly, over a third of the contents date from 1993 onward; that's too high a percentage to make the set an ideal introduction. Considering its title, Singles has a clear-cut purpose, unlike 2002's International. Then again, each of the 14 tracks contained on International are also here -- what amounts to an inferior version of Substance with some crucial tracks squeezed out in favor of lesser, later singles. A proper sequel to Substance, covering Technique through Sirens' Call, would've made more sense, but the lure in dressing up a combination of oft-recycled classics with slightly varying surroundings has yet to lose its appeal. Substance remains, and will likely always remain, the release to get you started. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rock - Released June 3, 2011 | WM UK

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Pop - Released January 20, 1989 | Rhino

Tastes and sounds were changing quickly in the late '80s, which prompted New Order's most startling transformation yet -- from moody dance-rockers to, well, moody acid-house mavens. After the band booked a studio on the island hotspot of Ibiza, apparently not knowing that it was the center of the burgeoning house music craze, New Order's sure instincts for blending rock and contemporary dance resulted in another confident, superb LP. Technique was the group's most striking production job, with the single "Fine Time" proving a close runner-up to "Blue Monday" as the most extroverted dance track in the band's catalog. Opening the record, it was a portrait of a group unrecognizable from its origins, delivering lascivious and extroverted come-ons amid pounding beats. It appeared that dance had fully taken over from rock, with the guitars and bass only brought in for a quick solo or bridge. But while pure dance was the case for the singles "Fine Time" and "Round & Round," elsewhere New Order were still delivering some of the best alternative pop around, plaintive and affecting songs like "Run" (the third single), "Love Less," and "Dream Attack." Placed in the perfect position to deliver the definitive alternative take on house music, the band produced another classic record. ~ John Bush
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Pop - Released May 15, 1985 | Rhino

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Pop - Released September 1, 1985 | Rhino

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Pop - Released September 29, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released June 3, 2011 | WM UK

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Pop - Released January 14, 1981 | Rhino

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Pop - Released January 11, 2013 | Rhino

Trumpeted in some circles as a New Order rarities collection, Lost Sirens doesn't really fit the bill as such, but it does offer a wealth of bonus tracks from circa 2005 -- call it the second disc of the deluxe edition that was never released for Waiting for the Sirens' Call. Their eighth album, it eventually appeared to be the band's swan song, given Peter Hook's eventual estrangement from the rest of the original lineup. Compared to that album's half-hearted songwriting and rote sound, Lost Sirens positively shines -- leading to the customary questions of why this material didn't replace several, if not many, songs on the original Sirens' Call. Most of the excitement is due to the lead-off track "I'll Stay with You," a solid rocker that sounds like it should've been their comeback single after 2001's energizing Get Ready. As on much of their work of the 2000s, guitar is forefront and synths are used only for texture, but with excellent results, led by the midtempo storm of "Hellbent" (the only previously unreleased track, which appeared on a 2005 hits collection). ~ John Bush
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 21, 2005 | Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released March 28, 2005 | Rhino

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Pop - Released September 15, 1986 | Rhino

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Pop - Released April 27, 1993 | Rhino

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 13, 2016 | Mute

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Pop - Released June 18, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Instead of settling down in front of the mixing board for another dance album (a lá Technique or Republic), New Order returned in 2001 with a sound and style they hadn't played with for over a decade. Unsurprisingly bored by the stale British club scene circa 2001, the band opened Get Ready with a statement of purpose, a trailer single ("Crystal") featuring a host of longtime New Order staples: a sublime melody, an inscrutable set of lyrics, a deft, ragged guitar line kicking in for the chorus, and Peter Hook's yearning bass guitar taking a near-solo role. Though there are several allowances for the electronic-dance form New Order helped develop, Get Ready is a very straight-ahead album, their first work in 15 years that's focused on songwriting and performance rather than grafted dance techniques. (Of course, the band proved themselves far more than studio hands at several points, stretching back over twenty years to Joy Division's landmark Unknown Pleasures, as well as later New Order LPs like 1985's Low-life and 1986's Brotherhood.) Listeners familiar with the blueprint of early New Order work will find much to love on Get Ready, from the tough rockers "60 Miles an Hour" and "Primitive Notion" to pastoral downtempo material like "Turn My Way," "Vicious Streak," and the melodica-driven closer "Run Wild." This naked songcraft, however, does reveal a few of the band's deficiencies. Bernard Summer's lyrics drift toward the inane: "I'll be there for you when you want me to/I'll stand by your side like I always do/In the dead of night it'll be alright/cuz I'll be there for you when you want me to." And the band can't help but identify with a younger generation of music-makers, inviting Primal Scream's Bobby Gillespie over for "Rock the Shack" and turning in a dense, chaotic production that's all but de rigeur for Gillespie but very strained for New Order. (The other main collaborative track, with stranded Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan, is surprisingly unembarassing.) Even for fans who don't need any convincing, Get Ready is a true "grower," an album that reveal its delicious secrets -- sublime songcraft, introverted delivery, collaborative musicianship -- slowly and only after several listens. ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released December 1, 2017 | Mute

New Order's fourth official live album documents the second of two sold-out concerts at Brixton Academy in November of 2015, shortly after Music Complete was released. While the title (NOMC15) implies that the album is going to center around the studio album, only a handful of its tracks appear: singles "Singularity," "Restless," "Tutti Frutti," "People on the High Line," and the standout album track "Plastic." Besides those, as well as a curious intro excerpt of Wagner's Das Rheingold, there's an excellent selection of the group's career highlights, as well as a few Joy Division tunes. Elly Jackson of La Roux pops up to provide backing vocals on a few numbers, exclaiming that she's ecstatic to be invited to such a momentous event occurring so close to her house. Bassist Tom Chapman sounds a little bit untethered compared to the group's departed co-founder Peter Hook, but he does a fine job nonetheless. Other than that, New Order run through many of their classics, delivering Moroder-esque disco beats and lightly sharp post-punk guitar riffs, sounding excellent and seeming to have a good time doing it. They get creative with the old favorites, updating them a little bit and making them a bit more dramatic, but not drowning out their essence. On some of the band's biggest hits, especially "Bizarre Love Triangle" and "True Faith," they alter the intros enough so that it takes about a minute for the audience to recognize what songs are coming. "Temptation" builds suspense by imitating the strings from Lou Reed's "Street Hassle," but this time the audience knows what's coming, chanting the opening "ooooooh"s well before the beats kick in. Following a slightly more rocked-up rendition of "Love Will Tear Us Apart," Bernard Sumner jokingly responds to "Blue Monday"'s stuttering kick-drum intro with "I recognize that beat!" ~ Paul Simpson
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Pop - Released May 12, 2016 | Mute

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Pop - Released November 16, 1999 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2015 | Mute