Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Solo Piano - Released September 1, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Sibelius’s piano music remains a secret – chronically neglected or approached from an entirely unsympathetic aesthetic standpoint. Sometimes, criticism is justified. “I will be the first to admit that Sibelius’s piano music is uneven in quality”, says Leif Ove Andsnes, pointing to the composer’s own cynicism towards his piano works as a possible reason for the neglect of the genuine gems. But Andsnes also professes in no uncertain terms that he is “on a mission” to bring Sibelius’s piano works out of the shadows. “I really believe in this music and I want people to hear it”, he says. After scouring every published note of the composer’s piano music, Andsnes has selected works for this recording that speak to him not just as a pianist but as a musician who for a long time has felt particularly close to Sibelius. Here are piano works in which Sibelius’s orchestral thinking advances the language of the instrument even if it can test the technical orthodoxies of the player. As may be imagined, Andsnes masters them with elegance and ease.
CD$18.99

Classical - Released April 11, 2011 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
CD$12.99

Classical - Released October 1, 2010 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
This release by Leif Ove Andsnes was anxiously awaited by both fans and EMI executives after the pop sales levels achieved by his album featuring the first two Rachmaninov concertos, and it seems likely that the Norwegian pianist will once again serve those who stand and wait. He has executed the undeniably neat trick of breathing new life into some of the most stolidly ensconced works of the piano concerto repertory, draining them of Russian sentiment and replacing those vital fluids with stunning technical mastery delivered at breakneck speed (especially in the outer movements of the Piano Concerto No. 3, Op. 30), and with a sort of hard edge. In so doing he runs counter to the type established by generations of keyboard-pounding Russians, and those who want that kind of a reading have many other choices. It's clear, however, that Rachmaninov has survived the disrespect heaped on his music during the modernist tyranny, and that his music is strong enough to reveal unsuspected facets in new readings. Andsnes finds plenty of them; hence the excitement. The two concertos have different flavors, and buyers may prefer one or the other. The Piano Concerto No. 3, a work explicitly composed with blood-and-guts-desiring American audiences in mind, is a bigger surprise for the listener, while the delicate and even bluesy Piano Concerto No. 4, Op. 40, from late in the composer's life (played here in its 1941 revision), benefits from his subtle control over the entire range of the keyboard. Only confirmed members of the old school, however, should be discouraged from trying this out. Booklet notes are in English, German, and French.
CD$12.99

Keyboard Concertos - Released February 14, 2014 | Sony Classical

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Solo Piano - Released September 7, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The four ballades of Chopin, more than the somewhat inaccurately named piano sonatas, are the composer's most complex works, both structurally and emotionally, and performances of them differ in substantial ways. They may emphasize sheer virtuosity, leading with Motorik rhythms in the big tunes toward blazing passages like the coda of the Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52. The Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes takes a different direction. He says that he has avoided playing the Ballades until he felt ready, and indeed his work here differs from his rather cool, clean way with Chopin in the past. "This is very personal music," he told Joshua Barone. "It’s not so often that you hear such a confessional quality: Give space for that when you listen to it." It's good advice: Andsnes' Ballades are ongoing monologues, with meter deemphasized and the virtuoso passages coming as explosions of passion that, as often as not, don't lead anywhere. This is arch-Romantic pianism of the best kind, even if it's rather low-key, and it's enhanced by the structure of the program: nocturnes serve as entr'actes between the four ballades. Sample one of these (perhaps the Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48, No. 1) to hear Andsnes' ability to put you in a state of suspended linear time here. Sony's sound from the studios of Radio Bremen is beautifully suited to Andsnes' reflective, intimate aims. The omission of the Ballade No. 4 from the booklet track list in the CD copy is a notable editorial flaw, but this is highly recommended.
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Concertos - Released September 11, 2012 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
HI-RES$15.49
CD$10.99

Classical - Released April 19, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
Justinus Kerner, a poet and a practicing physician fascinated with occultism, somnambulism and magnetism, inspired young Schumann who, at just seventeen, set to music the singular poet’s verses. He would eventually come back to it in 1840 with a strange cycle, “a masterpiece of dereliction” (according to Brigitte François-Sappey) he wrote as an exorcism for his mental illness: through a suite of twelve poems (Zwölf Gedichte Op. 35, better known as “Kerner Lieder”), Schumann projects his own destiny, questioning himself, trying to understand why sadness overwhelms his soul even though he’s in-love and newlywed.This pain produced a series of masterpieces that are still admired for their musical and philosophical reach. Liederkreis Op. 24 also dates back to 1840, a surprisingly prolific year for Schumann who composed like a mad man; his first cycle of lieder based on poems by Heinrich Heine about love and its inevitable consequences: expectations, hope, disillusionment and farewells.The result of many years of collaboration between Matthias Goerne and Leif Ove Andsnes, this album, recorded in Berlin in 2018, will undoubtedly be a landmark in Schumannian interpretation. The German baritone’s voice has grown deeper with age, giving a unique intensity rich with doubt and desolation, an impression reinforced by the strength and intensity of the Norwegian pianist’s performance. © François Hudry/Qobuz
CD$12.99

Classical - Released November 28, 2005 | Warner Classics

CD$20.49

Classical - Released February 11, 2008 | Warner Classics

CD$12.99

Classical - Released February 9, 1999 | Warner Classics

CD$12.99

Classical - Released September 1, 2003 | Warner Classics

CD$12.99

Classical - Released September 12, 2006 | Warner Classics

Titled Horizons and subtitled "A Personal Collection of Piano Encores," Leif Ove Andsnes' 2006 release can only make longtime fans of his playing ask three little questions: Andsnes? Encores? Really? A self-confessed "very serious young pianist" who played "only the most important repertoire," Andsnes had heretofore always seemed to be the contemporary pianist least likely to play an encore, much less a whole disc of 22 of them. And yet here it is -- and it is marvelous. Each piece is awe inspiring by itself -- the fragrant sensuality of Strauss' Stänchen, the concentrated spirituality of Bach's Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, the seductive virtuosity of Liszt's Liebestraum No. 3, or the sarcastic hilarity of Shostakovich's Polka -- and even more awe inspiring one after another. Some of them are very well-known -- Debussy's Clair de lune -- and some are virtually unknown -- Charles Trenet's Coin de rue arranged for solo piano by the mysterious Mr. Nobody -- but all of them are played with consummate technical mastery and, what's more amazing, a surprising amount of playful affection. One gets the sense that Andsnes is not only a tremendous virtuoso, but also a heck of a nice guy who can play 22 encores in a row and entertain and edify with every one. EMI's sound is absolutely transparent.
CD$25.49

Classical - Released September 3, 2012 | Warner Classics

CD$12.99

Classical - Released February 22, 2000 | Warner Classics

CD$7.99

Classical - Released November 19, 2012 | Warner Classics

CD$12.99

Classical - Released March 27, 2001 | Warner Classics

CD$25.49

Classical - Released May 1, 2006 | Warner Classics

HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res
CD$7.99

Classical - Released November 19, 2012 | Warner Classics

CD$7.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Warner Classics