Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$9.99

Blues - Released July 7, 2008 | Ace Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Like most things, listening to the blues should be approached with a sense of wonder, as if listening for the first time. Such is the way one should listen to John Lee Hooker’s music. The tracks in this album are among John Lee Hooker’s first, dating back 70 years on average. His fans will know his tracks by heart; others will at least recognise the style. And yet, listening and re-listening to these tracks is never a chore. On the classic Boogie Chillen, his breakthrough hit, we are reminded of how astounding his work is. His way of composing songs without a plan, the rusty-metal sound, the voice of this charming Prince of Darkness, and the way he taps his foot along to the rhythm and smooth boogie… no one played like that before John Lee Hooker, no one could come close. Many tried afterwards, but could never manage to completely imitate the original. Ailing from Mississippi before settling in Detroit where he began his career, John Lee Hooker created this style, and there he remained his whole life. Later on, he released records in which he was accompanied by other musicians, even white blues, rock and jazz stars (like Miles Davis). But it’s here, alone as an already revered artist on these twenty tracks, that he made his legend. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
From
CD$8.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1966 | Impulse!

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Given Hooker's unpredictable timing and piss-poor track record recording with bands, this 1965 one-off session for the jazz label Impulse! would be a recipe for disaster. But with Panama Francis on drums, Milt Hinton on bass, and Barry Galbraith on second guitar, the result is some of the best John Lee Hooker material with a band that you're likely to come across. The other musicians stay in the pocket, never overplaying or trying to get Hooker to make chord changes he has no intention of making. This record should be played for every artist who records with Hooker nowadays, as it's a textbook example of how exactly to back the old master. The most surreal moment occurs when William Wells blows some totally cool trombone on Hooker's version of Berry Gordy's "Money." If you run across this one in a pile of 500 other John Lee Hooker CDs, grab it; it's one of the good ones. © Cub Koda /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released November 6, 2020 | Mercury Studios

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 2007 | Original Blues Classics

John Lee Hooker won many new listeners with his 1989 star-studded comeback album, The Healer, and his 1992 studio album, Boom Boom, was designed as introduction to his classic songs for this new audience. It wasn't that The Healer or its 1991 follow-up, Mr. Lucky, avoided either Hooker's signature boogie or several of his signature tunes, but they were tempered by both a slicker production and newly written tunes. In contrast, Boom Boom was lean and direct, relying on such staples as "Boom Boom," "I'm Bad Like Jesse James," "Bottle Up and Go," and "I Ain't Gonna Suffer No More." This leanness is in comparison to its two immediate predecessors, of course, because Boom Boom is hardly as gritty as the original versions of these tunes. It might not feel as slick as The Healer, but it's polished and professional and filled with cameos -- but this time, the professional sound comes from the seasoned sidemen offering support and the stars here are all guitarists (or in the case of Charlie Musselwhite, a harpist) who never overshadow Hooker. Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray have never been known for their flashiness and they give their respective numbers -- "Boom Boom" and "Same Old Blues Again" -- sharp, typically tasteful leads, but even Albert Collins seems a bit restrained on "Boogie at Russian Hill" -- it's as if all involved decided to lay back and give Hook the center stage. However, he's not in a particularly energetic mood here. He's hardly lazy, but he's not inspired either, which leaves Boom Boom as a rather curious entry in his latter-day comeback catalog. The feel is better than The Healer (and certainly the subsequent Chill Out), but it's not as memorable as some of the other albums that may not have been as consistent but at least had distinguishing characteristics. Boom Boom just captures Hooker the professional -- which is good enough to modestly entertain as it plays but it leaves no real impression behind. [Pointblank reissued the CD in 1992.] © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1995 | Original Blues Classics

It's a bad sign if the first sound on a John Lee Hooker album is icy synths and it's a further problem if the first audible guitar is not Hook's but the distinctive rounded tone of Santana. These are two pretty big tipoffs that 1995's Chill Out isn't a typical John Lee Hooker album, and arriving after the very typical 1992 album Boom Boom that could be seen as a welcome change of pace; after all, that record might have been tight and professional but it never was engaging. Sadly, Chill Out is also far from captivating, living up far too well to the mellow promise of its title. This is the rare Hooker album that exists almost entirely on a superficial surface: his signature boogie is buried so deep that even the handful of solo cuts here don't feel as idiosyncratic as usual -- they're quiet and restrained, so much so that they barely rise above a murmur. They feel like mood music, which is ultimately what Chill Out is. Sanded free of any grit, it's an album of background blues, designed as a soundtrack to a tasteful afternoon at a coffeehouse or a bookstore. It's the John Lee Hooker album for people who like the idea of listening to Hooker but don't quite care for his music. © Stephen Thomas Erlewin /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1989 | Craft Recordings

The Healer was a major comeback for John Lee Hooker. Featuring a wide array of guest stars, including Bonnie Raitt, Johnnie Johnson, and Los Lobos, The Healer captured widespread media attention because of all the superstar musicians involved in its production. Unfortunately, that long guest list is what makes the album a fairly unengaging listen. Certainly there are moments were it clicks, but that's usually when the music doesn't greatly expand on his stripped-down boogie. The other moments are professional, but not exciting. It's a pleasant listen, but never quite an engaging one. © Thom Owens /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released February 7, 2020 | Justin Time Records

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 2013 | Geffen*

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1971 | EMI - EMI Records (USA)

When this two-LP set was initially released in January 1971, Canned Heat was back to its R&B roots, sporting slightly revised personnel. In the spring of the previous year, Larry "The Mole" Taylor (bass) and Harvey Mandel (guitar) simultaneously accepted invitations to join John Mayall's concurrent incarnation of the Bluesbreakers. This marked the return of Henry "Sunflower" Vestine (guitar) and the incorporation of Antonio "Tony" de la Barreda (bass), a highly skilled constituent of Aldolfo de la Parra (drums). Sadly, it would also be the final effort to include co-founder Alan "Blind Owl" Wilson, who passed away in September 1970. Hooker 'n Heat (1971) is a low-key affair split between unaccompanied solo John Lee Hooker (guitar/vocals) tunes, collaborations between Hooker and Wilson (piano/guitar/harmonica), as well as five full-blown confabs between Hooker and Heat. The first platter focuses on Hooker's looser entries that vacillate from the relatively uninspired ramblings of "Send Me Your Pillow" and "Drifter" to the essential and guttural "Feelin' Is Gone" or spirited "Bottle Up and Go." The latter being among those with Wilson on piano. Perhaps the best of the batch is the lengthy seven-minute-plus "World Today," which is languid and poignant talking blues, with Hooker lamenting the concurrent state of affairs around the globe. "I Got My Eyes on You" is an unabashed derivative of Hooker's classic "Dimples," with the title changed for what were most likely legal rather than artistic concerns. That said, the readings of the seminal "Burning Hell" and "Bottle Up and Go" kept their familiar monikers intact. The full-fledged collaborations shine as both parties unleash some of their finest respective work. While Canned Heat get top bill -- probably as it was the group's record company that sprung for Hooker 'n Heat -- make no mistake, as Hooker steers the combo with the same gritty and percussive guitar leads that have become his trademark. The epic "Boogie Chillen No. 2" stretches over 11 and a half minutes and is full of the same swagger as the original, with the support of Canned Heat igniting the verses and simmering on the subsequent instrumental breaks with all killer and no filler. The 2002 two-CD pressing by the French Magic Records label is augmented with "It's All Right," with a single edit of "Whiskey and Wimmen." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Original Blues Classics

With new John Lee Hooker songs, new versions of old Hooker songs, four duets with and a new song by Van Morrison, Don't Look Back continues the venerable bluesman's string of excellent albums in his '90s renaissance. Produced by Morrison, it also celebrates the 25th anniversary of their first recording together, as Morrison guested on Hooker's seminal Never Get Out of These Blues Alive in 1972. Don't Look Back hits the ground running with a rowdy, thumpin' remake of "Dimples" with Los Lobos; "Spellbound" pounds out more of Hooker's stylistic trademark -- throbbing, raw, hard-driving boogie. The Morrison tracks include the ruminative title cut and his haunting "The Healing Game." Hooker also gives Hendrix's classic blues "Red House" his own rough-hewn, distinctive treatment. © Chris Slawecki /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 2007 | Original Blues Classics

John Lee Hooker's recordings for Virgin/Point Blank may have varied in quality, but never in formula. Once The Healer earned reams of praise and, more importantly, solid sales upon its 1989 release, it was pretty much set in stone that every future Hooker album would be painstakingly constructed and boast a plethora of superstar cameos. The guest stars were designed to bring in a larger audience, who would hopefully be impressed enough to stick around for Hooker's solid stuff, which was usually better than the attention-grabbing, star-studded tracks. Of course, the names are what sold, and Virgin did not overlook that fact, choosing to assemble a collection of highlights titled The Best of Friends in 1998. The title refers to the superstar duets, and while this very well may be the best of those cuts -- well, almost all of the duets are here, including both the sublime ("I Cover the Waterfront," with Van Morrison) and the mediocre -- this stuff still isn't as good as Hooker's solo recordings from this era. Which means this disc is primarily for listeners who like to think they like Hooker, but they really just want to hear Eric Clapton wail away. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$6.49

Blues - Released January 27, 2020 | Nostalgic Melody Music Production

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released September 25, 2020 | Mercury Studios

Hi-Res
From
CD$11.49

Blues - Released May 29, 2020 | Ace Records

From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Blues - Released November 10, 1970 | Tradition Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1991 | Specialty Records

John Lee Hooker was still churning out R&B-influenced electric blues with a rhythm section for Vee Jay when he recorded The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker, his first album packaged for the folk/traditional blues market. He plays nothing but acoustic guitar, and seems to have selected a repertoire with old-school country-blues in mind. It's unimpressive only within the context of Hooker's body of work; in comparison with other solo outings, the guitar sounds thin, and the approach restrained. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
From
CD$63.99

Blues - Released October 6, 2017 | Craft Recordings

Booklet
John Lee Hooker was one of the greatest figures to rise from post-war blues, but he always stood out from other artists in the genre. The minimalism of his style drew a clear line from the pioneering figures of Delta blues, but the hypnotic insistence of his song structures and the unrelenting stomp of his boogie rhythms took those influences to another time and place. Hooker's music could speak of joy or menace with equal force, and with remarkably few changes. And while 12-bar was the unyielding template for nearly every other blues artist, Hooker followed no rules beyond his own muse, embracing rhythmic structures and chord changes that seemed chaotic on paper but sounded brilliant when executed by Hooker. While clearly a bluesman, he was a subgenre unto himself, a musician with a singular approach that many followed but no one could duplicate with the same gravity. In addition to being unique, Hooker was also prolific, recording literally dozens of albums for many different labels in a career that stretched from 1948 to 1997, and compiling a set that accurately represents the length and breadth of his catalog is no simple task. 2017's King of the Boogie is a five-disc set compiled with the cooperation of Hooker's estate and attempts to skim the cream from his massive body of work. The first three discs comprise a (relatively) concise summary of his studio material, while disc four is devoted to live recordings, and disc five is a sampler of his collaborations with other artists, which dominated many of his latter-day albums. Given the very distinct stages of Hooker's career -- his early acoustic sides, his later electric material, his evolution into working with a full band, and the polished, star-sprinkled late period sides -- it's very much a matter of the taste of individual fans that will determine how much they like the three-disc career summary. That said, the track selection delivers most of the acknowledged classics, offers an accurate balance of the various phases of his career, and throws in a few surprises ("Shake, Holler and Run" takes an obvious "Shake, Rattle and Roll" lift and turns it into something very much its own once Hooker is done with it). The live tracks demonstrate his strength and charisma as a live performer, and if the duets are not for many Hooker purists, the fact artists as gifted as Carlos Santana, Bonnie Raitt, B.B. King, and Los Lobos were eager to work with him speaks volumes about how respected he was. It's probably impossible to assemble a truly definitive John Lee Hooker collection, but King of the Boogie leaves no doubt of his talent, his unique vision, and the lasting importance of his music. Add a well-designed package with plenty of rare photos, fine liner notes from Jas Obrecht, and well-detailed track annotation, and you have a splendid sampler that should please loyal fans and dazzle those who have never been introduced to Hooker's music. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Blues - Released March 31, 2017 | Vee-Jay Records

Booklet
From
CD$8.99

Blues - Released March 22, 1967 | Geffen

This is the Boogie Man's 1967 ABC-BluesWay album in its entirety. Hooker's Chicago sidemen (including Eddie Taylor, Wayne Bennett, and Louis Myers) deftly handle Hooker's eccentricities on "Mr. Lucky," and the harrowing "The Motor City Is Burning," as well as a sprightly remake of "Boom Boom." © Bill Dahl /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1998 | Vee-Jay Records

Winding through the literally hundreds of titles in John Lee Hooker's catalog is a daunting task for even the most seasoned and learned blues connoisseur. This is especially true when considering Hooker recorded under more than a dozen aliases for as many labels during the late '40s, '50s, and early '60s. I'm John Lee Hooker was first issued in 1959 during his tenure with Vee Jay and is "the Hook" in his element as well as prime. Although many of these titles were initially cut for Los Angeles-based Modern Records in the early '50s, the recordings heard here are said to best reflect Hooker's often-emulated straight-ahead primitive Detroit and Chicago blues styles. The sessions here comprise I'm John Lee Hooker, with its 12 tracks taken from six sessions spread over the course of four years (1955-1959). Hooker works both solo -- accompanied only by his own percussive guitar and the solid backbeat of his foot rhythmically pulsating against plywood -- as well as in several different small-combo settings. Unlike the diluted, pop-oriented blues that first came to prominence in the wake of the British Invasion of the early to mid-'60s, the music on this album is infinitely more authentic in presentation. As the track list indicates, I'm John Lee Hooker includes many of his best-known and best-loved works. Right out of the gate comes the guttural rumble-tumble of "Dimples" in its best-known form; indeed, it can be directly traced to -- and is likewise acknowledged by -- notable purveyors of Brit rock such as Eric Burdon, who incorporated it into the earliest incarnation of the Animals, the Spencer Davis Group, and the decidedly more roots-influenced Duane Allman. Another of Hooker's widely covered signature tunes featured on this volume is "Boogie Chillun." This rendering is arguably the most recognizable in the plethora of versions that have seemingly appeared on every Hooker-related compilation available. Additionally, this version was prominently featured in The Blues Brothers movie as well as countless other films and adverts. Likewise, a seminal solo "Crawlin' King Snake" is included here. The tune became not only a staple of Hooker's, it was also prominently included on the Doors' L.A. Woman and covered by notable bluesmen Albert King, B.B. King, and Big Joe Williams, whose version pre-dates this one by several decades. I'm John Lee Hooker is one of the great blues collections of the post-World War II era. Time has, if anything, only reinforced the significance of the album. It belongs in every blues enthusiast's collection without reservation. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo