Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$11.99
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
Compared to his earlier Blue Note recordings, organist Jimmy Smith's outings for Verve are not as strong from a jazz standpoint. Certainly his renditions of the "Theme from Joy House," "The Cat," and the "Main Title from The Carpetbaggers" are not all that significant. However, this set has some tasteful arrangements for the big band by Lalo Schifrin, and some good playing by the great organist on a variety of other blues-oriented material. Also, the combination of organ with a big band is sometimes quite appealing, making this album worth picking up despite its commercial focus. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Blue Note Records

Midnight Special is a perfect complement to Back at the Chicken Shack, which was recorded the same day. Organist Jimmy Smith, tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine, and guitarist Kenny Burrell always make for a potent team, and with drummer Donald Bailey completing the group, the quartet digs soulfully into such numbers as the groovin' "Midnight Special," "Jumpin' the Blues," and "One O'Clock Jump." Highly recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1972 | Verve

Hi-Res
HI-RES$43.49
CD$38.49

Jazz - Released December 9, 2016 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Blue Thumb

On his first album in more than five years, Jimmy Smith, who turned 75 shortly before the release date, attempts the soul-jazz version of what Santana did on Supernatural -- heavily featuring guest stars in an attempt to broaden his appeal. The basic band consists of Smith on organ, Reggie McBride on bass guitar, and Harvey Mason on drums, but this trio is never featured alone, although four tracks feature the trio joined only by guitarist Russell Malone -- "C C Rider," "Mood Indigo" (with John Clayton replacing McBride on acoustic bass), and two new Smith originals, the title track and "Tuition Blues." (On a fifth song, a remake of Smith's "8 Counts for Rita," the quartet is joined by percussionist Lenny Castro.) Not surprisingly, these are the most jazz-oriented performances on the album. The rest of the disc takes a blues turn, with Dr. John contributing vocals and piano on his own composition, the lead-off track "Only in It for the Money"; Taj Mahal singing and playing guitar on his own "Strut"; Etta James singing the Muddy Waters hit "I Just Wanna Make Love to You"; Keb' Mo' taking guitar and vocal duties on his composition "Over & Over"; and B.B. King doing the same on his old favorite "Three O'Clock Blues." Thus, half the album is given over to guest stars who sing, making this the most vocal-dominated album ever released under Jimmy Smith's name. As a consequence, it is also something of a blues sampler with Smith playing a prominent role rather than a Jimmy Smith album. Jazz fans will be happy to know that, after more than 40 years of recording, Smith retains his ability to play, but Dot Com Blues is anything but a showcase for the man whose name is on the cover. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Booklet
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released February 12, 1963 | Blue Note Records

Back at the Chicken Shack is one of organist Jimmy Smith's classic Blue Note sessions, and the first to draw attention to tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine. Recorded in 1960 with Kenny Burrell on guitar, Donald Bailey on drums, and Turrentine, the group reaches the peak of funky soul jazz that all other challengers of the genre would have to live up to. Included on this uptempo session is a reworking of "When I Grow Too Old to Dream" (a feature for Turrentine), Turrentine's "Minor Chant," two Smith compositions, "Messy Bessie" as well as the set's notable title cut. Smith's Midnight Special album was recorded at these same sessions, and is also exceptional. [Some reissues add a bonus track, "On the Sunny Side of the Street."] © Al Campbell /TiVo
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1959 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

Hi-Res
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released June 15, 1965 | Verve Reissues

Most of organist Jimmy Smith's recordings for Verve during the mid- to late '60s were with big bands, making this trio outing with guitarist Kenny Burrell and drummer Grady Tate a special treat. This outing is a throwback to Smith's Blue Note sets (which had concluded two years earlier) and gives the organist the opportunity to stretch out on three blues and three standards. This release shows that, even with all of his commercial success during the period, Smith was always a masterful jazz player. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

Playing piano-style single-note lines on his Hammond B-3 organ, Jimmy Smith revolutionized the use of the instrument in a jazz combo setting in the mid-'50s and early '60s, and arguably his best albums for Blue Note during this period were the ones he did with tenor sax player Stanley Turrentine. Recorded on February 8, 1963, at Van Gelder Studio in New Jersey, and featuring Quentin Warren on guitar and Donald Bailey on drums in addition to Smith and Turrentine, Prayer Meetin' is a delight from start to finish. Forming a perfect closure to Smith's trio of albums with Turrentine (Midnight Special and Back at the Chicken Shack were both released in 1960), Prayer Meetin' was the last of four albums Smith recorded in a week to finish off his Blue Note contract before leaving for Verve. The blues roots are obvious here, and the Smith-penned title track might even be called jazz-gospel, but the single most striking cut is a version of Ivory Joe Hunter's "I Almost Lost My Mind," with both Smith and Turrentine building wonderful solos, suggesting new pathways for organ and sax as complementary instruments. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
CD$10.49

Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 1992 | Verve

This Christmas jazz album has five selections in which organist Jimmy Smith is joined by a big band arranged by either Billy Byers or Al Cohn. The remaining selections feature Smith with a variety of trios; guitarist Wes Montgomery is heard on "Baby It's Cold Outside," one of two "bonus" cuts taken from other sessions that help to fill up this otherwise brief set. Smith is fine on "Jingle Bells," "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" and two versions of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" and, even if nothing all that unusual occurs, the performances can serve as high-quality background music during the Christmas season. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

The Hammond organ mastery of Jimmy Smith is arguably nowhere as profound as on 1959's Home Cookin'. Support is provided by the formidable trio of drummer Donald Bailey, guitarist Kenny Burrell, and tenor Percy France. Here they couple a few understated cool R&B classics with their own originals. The almost dirge-like cadence of "See See Rider" is given a bluesy and low-key workout, featuring tasty interaction between Smith and Burrell. The languid pace churns steadily as they trade off impressive solos with almost palpable empathy. Burrell's "Sugar Hill" swings with a refined post-bop attack. His call-and-response with Smith conjures the pair's trademark give and take, which is assuredly one of the reasons the two maintained a five-plus-decade association. Ray Charles' "I Got a Woman" is nothing short of definitive as the upbeat rhythm immediately propels Smith and Burrell into an otherwise unassuming and practically infectious bounce. Also duly noted is the sturdy backing of Bailey, whose discerning and compact snare is impeccably suited to the arrangement. (Sadly, the track fades just as the band begin to really get loose.) "Messin' Around" and "Gracie" bring France on board, adding a subtle reedy texture to Smith's intricate and advanced melodies. "Come on Baby" is another Burrell composition that slinks with a soulful mid-tempo groove, allowing for some inspired soloing. The title perfectly captures the travelogue nature, proving that getting there is indeed half the fun. Jimmy Smith's voluminous catalog is remarkably solid throughout and Home Cookin' is a recommended starting place for burgeoning enthusiasts as well as a substantial entry for the initiated. [Some reissues add five additional cuts, including an alternate take of "Motorin' Along," two readings of the pop standard "Since I Fell for You" and an impressive cover of Jack McDuff's "Groanin'."] © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1957 | Blue Note Records

HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1956 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released June 7, 1965 | Verve Reissues

After seven high-quality years with Blue Note, organist Jimmy Smith switched over to the Verve label for a lengthy and fruitful run lasting from 1963 until the early '70s (Smith would eventually return to the company for two fine albums in the mid-'90s). This 1965 Verve release, Got My Mojo Workin', finds the B-3 innovator mixing it up with organ and guitar combo swingers and big band charts compliments of arranger Oliver Nelson. On the first half of the disc, Smith delves into the day's chart-topping terrain with passable shots at the Stevie Wonder hit "High Heel Sneakers," Jagger and Richard's "Satisfaction," and the pop candy of "1-2-3." While Smith certainly avails himself nicely on the organ, his grunt-and-sweat vocal interjections threaten to derail things. This askew, Ray Charles-esque vocalizing continues on the Muddy Waters title track, but thankfully takes a hike for the trio of big band cookers -- including fine readings of Billy Strayhorn's "Johnny Come Lately" and Ellington's "C-Jam Blues" -- that close out the album. Aided by the stellar likes Kenny Burrell, Ernie Royal, Phil Woods, Ron Carter, and Grady Tate, Got My Mojo Workin' is not a top Smith release, but one dedicated fans will probably want to check out. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1967 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Blue Note Records

Back at the Chicken Shack is one of organist Jimmy Smith's classic Blue Note sessions, and the first to draw attention to tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine. Recorded in 1960 with Kenny Burrell on guitar, Donald Bailey on drums, and Turrentine, the group reaches the peak of funky soul jazz that all other challengers of the genre would have to live up to. Included on this uptempo session is a reworking of "When I Grow Too Old to Dream" (a feature for Turrentine), Turrentine's "Minor Chant," two Smith compositions, "Messy Bessie" as well as the set's notable title cut. Smith's Midnight Special album was recorded at these same sessions, and is also exceptional. [Some reissues add a bonus track, "On the Sunny Side of the Street."] © Al Campbell /TiVo
CD$20.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records