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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Virgin Catalogue

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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Sanctuary Records

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Metal - Released January 1, 1997 | Virgin Records

By the late '90s, guitarist Gary Moore was at a career crossroads. Should he continue on the path that brought him his biggest stateside success (Still Got the Blues), or try something a bit contemporary? The ex-Thin Lizzy member decided on the latter, issuing Dark Days in Paradise, an album that saw Moore utilize electronic beats and, of course, his trademark soaring guitar work, rather than blues-rockers. And you have to give the guitarist credit -- he does venture outside of what you'd usually expect from a new Moore album, whether it be the Beatlesque "One Fine Day" (which contains a bassline quite similar to the Fab Four's "Rain") or the keyboard-heavy ballad "Like Angels" (which sounds like it's straight from 1987). While fans of Victims of the Future may be left wondering where the hard rock went, Dark Days in Paradise will be an interesting listen for fans curious to hear Moore trying new approaches. [Originally released in 1997, Dark Days in Paradise was reissued by Virgin in 2003 with three bonus tracks: "Burning in Our Hearts," "There Must Be a Way," and the title track.] © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Virgin Records

A handy and generous double-disc (one live, one studio) compilation of Gary Moore's four Virgin label blues albums is predominantly an excellent introduction to this showy hard rocker turned midlife third-generation bluesman. The 31 tracks liberally sample from his relatively short five-year association with Virgin (roughly 1990-1995) but ignore his excellent 2001 Back to the Blues release on Sanctuary. Still, there are more than enough hot licks here to prove that Moore could be a convincing blues musician if he decided to give up his more ostentatious shred rock profession and focus on blues full time. While purists may gripe as Moore tears off searing, high-voltage riffs on covers of tracks made popular by Johnny "Guitar" Watson, Otis Rush, and John Mayall as well as Freddie, B.B., and Albert King (the latter two along with Albert Collins turn up as guests on both discs), there's no denying the emotional ties the guitarist has to this material or his obvious vocal and instrumental talents. Unfortunately, Blues for Greeny, Moore's successful tribute to philosophical mentor Peter Green, is under-represented with only a handful of cuts, one of which ("Need Your Love So Bad") is presented in an edited single version. Otherwise, this is a well-selected but poorly annotated (bandmembers aren't even mentioned, nor are sources of the songs or when and where the live tracks were recorded) compilation that shows how a rugged rock star can transform into a respectable bluesman, albeit one who plays very loud. Gary Moore may not be a rootsy, down-home guitarist, but he's just as passionate about this music as anyone who recorded for Chess. If Moore can expose other generations to the blues, as Cream and the Rolling Stones did before him, he has done his job well. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 1982 | Virgin Records

This is the first of Irish guitar virtuoso Gary Moore's true heavy metal albums. Boasting a crisp, aggressive sound, Corridors of Power kicks off with the foot-stomping "Don't Take Me for a Loser," delivers the token power ballad in "Always Gonna Love You," and floors the gas pedal on "Rockin' Every Night." However, the album's climax has to be the epic "End of the World," with it's two-minute long guitar solo intro and vocals courtesy of Cream's Jack Bruce. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1983 | Virgin Records

Gary Moore might just be the greatest guitar hero America's never heard of, probably because only his recent blues recordings have benefited from proper distribution stateside. In fact, Moore has worn so many hats during his near 30-year career that the words eclectic and unfocused immediately come to mind. Victims of the Future arrived in the middle of the most consistent phase of his career -- that of a heavy metal guitar slinger. Between the epic cold war-inspired title track and the massive riffing of "Murder in the Skies" (written about the Korean airliner shot own by Russian fighter jets), Moore assaults the listener with more guitar notes than appear in most careers. These are great songs though, and his powerful vocals are also very effective, especially on the hit ballad "Empty Rooms." None of Moore's recordings are very easy to find in America, but make sure this is the first one you look for. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released September 22, 2014 | Eagle Rock - Eagle Records

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Rock - Released July 28, 2009 | Mercury Studios

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Blues - Released April 30, 2021 | Provogue Records

How Blue Can You Get collects a selection of unreleased material from the late Gary Moore's archives. Included are takes of Freddie King's "I'm Tore Down," Elmore James' "Done Somebody Wrong," and Memphis Slim's "Steppin' Out," alongside some of Moore's own material. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 2006 | Virgin Catalogue

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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Blues and Beyond is a compilation box set assembling various recordings from legendary Northern Irish singer/songwriter and blues guitarist Gary Moore. The collection features previously unheard material as well as live renditions of the hits "Still Got the Blues" and "Parisienne Walkways." I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow, an authorized biography written by music journalist Harry Shapiro, is also included. © Rob Wacey /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 1998 | Virgin Records

Irish guitarist Gary Moore has built an entire career on stubborn self-recycling. Just when listeners think they have him pegged within a particular musical style (heavy metal guitar slinger, soft-hearted acoustic player, jazz fusion experimentalist, electric blues purist), the enduring six-string legend throws a curve ball and changes artistic direction -- seemingly just to spite his critics. Because of this, his extensive recorded legacy as a solo artist has defied adequate encapsulation into greatest-hits packages, and in America, where his profile has never exceeded the status of a connoisseur's favorite, taking a first stab at discovering his work becomes an even more vexing task. Out in the Fields: The Very Best of Gary Moore doesn't solve this problem, but it does alleviate it somewhat by concentrating on Moore's best-known guise among the aforementioned connoisseur club -- hard rock and heavy metal guitar shredder. Included here are the rare mainstream hits ("Out in the Fields," "Wild Frontier"), balls-out metal headbangers ("Run for Cover," "Military Man"), sublime ballads ("Parisienne Walkways," "Empty Rooms"), and later-day blues successes ("Cold Day in Hell," "Still Got the Blues"). In an imperfect world and a less-than-perfect career, this is about as spot-on as one can expect. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 2002 | EMI Marketing

Not wanting to leave a good thing behind, Moore reprises Still Got the Blues on its follow-up, After Hours. While his playing is just as impressive, the album feels a little calculated. Nevertheless, Moore's gutsy, impassioned playing makes the similarity easy to ignore. © David Jehnzen /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 1989 | Virgin Catalogue

Gary Moore's 1989 release, After the War features a return to the metal guitar riffing of his '80s records ("Speak for Yourself" and "Running from the Storm"), while continuing to explore more conventional pop dynamics with mixed results. It works great on "Ready to Love," and, after dedicating his last album to fallen childhood friend and musical partner in crime, Phil Lynott, Moore finally honors him in song with the moving "Blood of Emeralds." As it turned out, this would be Moore's last hard rock album before he became a born-again bluesman. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released September 22, 2008 | Mercury Studios

Another year, another Gary Moore blues-rock album nearly interchangeable with the last. That's no problem for fans or even newcomers, because despite the surface similarities between releases, Moore never seems to be going through the motions for the sake of further bulking up his already substantial catalog. His tough guitar lines remain biting yet classy, and his underappreciated voice is strong and convincing on originals and covers that nail all of the blues-rock bases without sounding rote. While there are no surprises here, Bad for You Baby is far from a disappointment. Moore continues a string of rugged, post-hard rock, power blues that he has carved his niche in since 1990's Still Got the Blues. He applies his throaty vocals and feral guitar to a pair of Muddy Waters tunes to impressive effect. No one will mistake his versions of Waters' "Walking Through the Park" or "Someday Baby" for the classic Chess era nuggets they are. Yet Moore's rocked up attack hits the mark for being relatively faithful to their melodies even as he wields his power blues sledgehammer. Moore boogies through J.B. Lenoir's "Mojo Boogie" like he invented the style, and even if his husky vocals will never be mistaken for Lenoir's reedy, high pitched singing, he tears into the tune with enough energy to shake up anything in the Johnny Winter songbook. Guitar shredders will thrill to the hot fret acrobatics of the double-time "Down the Line," and those who thought Led Zeppelin's first album was their finest hour should chow down on the hard rocking Jimmy Page-isms of "Umbrella Man." Moore writes one for the ladies on the sweet ballad "Holding On," which won't win any awards for lyrical complexity but boasts a lovely melody and Otis Taylor's daughter, Cassie, on backing vocals. Cassie returns with her dad (plucking nearly inaudible banjo) for the swamped up "Preacher Man Blues" that features some surprisingly effective harp from Moore, the only time he plays it on this disc. Al Kooper's slow, yearning "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" from the New Yorker's Blood, Sweat & Tears stint is given an extended, nearly 11-minute treatment that's as compelling as BS&T's. Those hoping for Moore to expand his horizons will need to wait a little longer, but for existing followers and especially those new to his gutsy approach, Bad for You Baby more than fills the bill. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 27, 1999 | Sanctuary Records

All credit to Gary Moore for having the courage to leap into the relative unknown with A DIFFERENT BEAT. It is indeed greatly removed from anything he had released prior to 1999. Perhaps it was the new-found freedom from the guitarist's contract with Virgin that fuelled the change of direction--that and Moore's obvious affinity with outfits along the lines of Apollo 440 and Fatboy Slim (to whom "Fatboy" is a tribute). There's still opportunity for some trademark axe solos, thankfully, and hearing Moore's fretwork gymnastics over contemporary dance beats is a totally unique experience. Most impressive are "Lost in Your Love," given an impassioned vocal and instrumental performance, and the blissed-out "Surrender," the other end of the emotional scale entirely. "Bring My Baby Back," meanwhile is a marvellous pictorial description of a jilted lover's impending train ride to attempt a rescue of his former love. Moore and his production team serve up a pleasing array of dance beats, spiced up with inimitable melodies. A Phat Lizzy, perhaps?! © TiVo
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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

Blues and Beyond is a compilation box set assembling various recordings from legendary Northern Irish singer/songwriter and blues guitarist Gary Moore. The collection features previously unheard material as well as live renditions of the hits "Still Got the Blues" and "Parisienne Walkways." I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow, an authorized biography written by music journalist Harry Shapiro, is also included. © Rob Wacey /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 31, 2020 | Provogue Records

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In 2009, just over a year before his untimely death, the late, great Irish bluesman played an intimate set at London's Islington Academy which has since gone down in legend among his fans. Recorded for posterity, it appeared in January 2020. Featuring Moore at the top of his game, it includes some of his best-loved tunes including "Since I Met You Baby," "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," "Walking by Myself," and the classic "Parisienne Walkways." © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1994 | Virgin Records

This ill-advised compilation rudely splices early ballads from Gary Moore's "metal period" ("Empty Rooms," "Johnny Boy") with his better-known latter-day blues experiments ("Midnight Blues," "Story of the Blues"). It's mostly solid material notwithstanding; however, this record can only be described as a doomed marriage -- the kind that could only have made sense to awful people like record company execs. Even worse, the record exposes the troubling similarity between 1979's "Parisienne Walkways" (co-written by Thin Lizzy main man Phil Lynott) and 1990's "Still Got the Blues" (Moore's biggest stateside success) in a blatant case of self-plagiarism. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo