Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released February 28, 1994 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
One of the reasons that some major labels love to license big chunks of their catalogs to smaller independent outfits for box set reissues is that they never know that those licensees will turn up in putting those sets together, and it all becomes fair game for the parent company. Thus, in 1994, a year after Mosaic unearthed five previously unissued tracks from the October 1957 sessions that yielded The Atomic Mr. Basie on Roulette, Capitol Records (which had acquired the Roulette library) issued this expanded version of the original album. The original 11 songs are here, remastered into proper mono (there was an impossible to listen to duophonic stereo master made at the time of release that was in circulation on LP for a time), along with five outtakes consisting of material written and arranged by Jimmy Mundy: the instrumentals "Silks and Satins," "Sleepwalker's Serenade" (two different takes), and "The Late Late Show" and a vocal version of the latter featuring Joe Williams. These were apparently part of a proposed Jimmy Mundy album that never got completed, and were forgotten; they fit in surprisingly well with the Neal Hefti arrangements comprised the original recording, and Joe Williams turns in some of the best work of his career on the vocal version of "The Late Late Show," a sultry, richly intoned performance that positively seduces the listener, with the band blowing beautifully behind him. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Golden Oldies
The Count and his orchestra tackle the music of the Fab Four, without any hint of condescension or lassitude. Indeed, the 11 songs by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and one ("Kansas City") by Leiber & Stoller are treated with the same kind of dignity and enthusiasm that the band would give to the likes of Johnny Mercer or Harold Arlen. "Kansas City" is the bluesiest number here, and the one with which the band is obviously the most comfortable -- it's the only number here that could have appeared, as is, on any Basie album of the previous decade. But "Michelle" is the best track here, a gently swinging rendition in which Basie's piano is featured in some pleasing flourishes and the band slips into a satisfying groove. The rest also comes off well -- the ballads fare the best, showing off the quieter side of the band, stretching out and luxuriating on pieces like "Do You Want to Know a Secret." Basie and company also rise to the occasion on rockers like "I Wanna Be Your Man" and "Can't Buy Me Love," taking big bites out of the beat and the principal melodies with some hot ensemble playing and solos. In the end, the songs and the band are both well served by Chico O'Farrill's arrangements, which manage to maintain the familiar and emphasize some surprises. Even "Yesterday," the most over-recorded of the Beatles' songs, comes off fresh, with a moving jazz vocal treatment from Bill Henderson supported by Basie's engaging organ fills and a quietly soaring trombone and sax section. The band romps, and the soloists, in addition to Basie, include Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis and Al Grey. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | GRP

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
One of Count Basie's few small-group sessions of the '60s was his best. With trumpeter Thad Jones and tenors Frank Foster and Eric Dixon filling in the septet, Basie is in superlative form on a variety of blues, standards and two originals apiece from Thad Jones and Frank Wess. Small-group swing at its best. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released June 1, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Although it appeared at a time when Count Basie was enjoying respect from all quarters (as evidenced by the pop acclaim of several Grammy awards and the jazz faithful's enthusiasm for his concert at Newport), Chairman of the Board was, comparatively, a low-profile session. The record was surrounded in Basie's discography by several prize-winners and a parade of studio collaborations -- with vocalists Tony Bennett, Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, and Billy Eckstine, plus arranger Neal Hefti. This 1958 date for Roulette was a rare chance for the orchestra to perform on its own, and listeners to hear how powerful the band could be when its concentration was undiverted. Of course, Basie's band already possessed three fine arrangers (Frank Foster, Thad Jones, and Frank Wess) and at least a dozen solo voices. Each of the ten songs on Chairman of the Board were originals by Foster, Jones, Wess, or Ernie Wilkins, all of them arranged by the composer. The record is admittedly heavy on the blues, but it's a brassy, powerful vision of the blues; Foster's "Blues in Hoss' Flat" and Wilkins' "Kansas City Shout" take the band back to its hometown, beginning with a subtle swing but ending with a raucous display of power from each section. The contributions by Jones and Wess provide a necessary complement to that forceful swing. Jones' "Speaking of Sounds" employs the woodwinds to provide color and texture, while Wess' "Segue in C" relies on bassist Eddie Jones and Basie's piano to lead the band while Wess himself takes several choruses on alto sax. A dynamic date, it shows the "new testament" edition of Basie's orchestra in top form. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$14.49

Vocal Jazz - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The Roulette half of the two Bennett/Basie sessions is a band singer's paradise, with the Basie band caught at a robust and swinging peak and Bennett never sounding happier or looser in front of a microphone. The Count himself, alas, appears on piano only on two numbers ("Life Is a Song" and "Jeepers Creepers"), while Bennett's perennial pianist Ralph Sharon takes over on the remaining ten tracks and does all the charts. Yet Sharon writes idiomatically for the Count's style, whether on frantic rave-ups like "With Plenty of Money and You" and "Strike Up the Band" or relaxed swingers like "Chicago." Though not a jazz singer per se, the flavor of jazz is everywhere in Bennett's voice, which in those days soared like a trumpet. The 1990 CD included an atmospheric unissued Neal Hefti ballad "After Supper," but even this bonus track does little to extend the skimpy playing time (about 31 minutes) of what is still a great, desirable snapshot from American showbiz of the late 1950s. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1976 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This is a classic encounter in the Original Jazz Classics series. Pianist Count Basie (in his best-small group outing of the 1970s) and tenor saxophonist Zoot Sims were mutually inspired by each other's presence and, with the tasteful assistance of bassist John Heard and drummer Louie Bellson, they can be heard playing at the peak of their creative powers. Every listener interested in swinging jazz should pick up this disc, if only to hear these hard-charging versions of "I Never Knew," "It's Only a Paper Moon," and "Honeysuckle Rose." A gem, and essential music. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The official start of Count Basie's decade-long association with Norman Granz's Pablo label was a bit disappointing, an all-star cast (with trumpeter Harry "Sweets" Edison, trombonist J.J. Johnson and tenors Eddie Davis and Zoot Sims) playing one blues after another. Reasonably pleasing but uninspired, there would be many better Basie dates coming up. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released April 15, 1996 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Although Count Basie gets top billing, he actually doesn't even appear on this set. Basie's Orchestra and pianist Kirk Stuart are purely in a supporting role behind the magnificent voice of Sarah Vaughan, other than a couple of short spots for trumpeter Joe Newman and Frank Foster's tenor. Sometimes Vaughan sounds overly mannered and seems to give little weight to the words she is singing, but her wide range and impeccable musicianship carry the day. Highlights include "Perdido," "Mean to Me," and "You Go to My Head," and the set is understandably recommended more for Sarah Vaughan fans than Count Basie collectors. [Some reissues add a pair of charming Vaughan duets with Joe Williams, "Teach Me Tonight" and "If I Were a Bell," that were originally released as a single, plus an alternate take of "Until I Met You."] © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1982 | Pablo

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This was an excellent outing by the Count Basie Orchestra during its later years. Actually, half of this album features a medium-sized group from Basie's big band, but his orchestra usually had the feel of a small group anyway. Soloists at this late stage include Eric Dixon and Kenny Hing on tenors, trombonist Booty Wood, altoist Danny Turner and four different trumpeters. The rhythm section is of course instantly recognizable and the music is very much in the Basie tradition. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1963 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
For this set, it was Quincy Jones's turn to provide a program for the Basie Orchestra. All nine of the originals are virtually forgotten today but are very well-played by this veteran band. Although Frank Foster was still in the band, Eric Dixon (on tenor and flute) was starting to assert himself as a major solo voice while trumpeter Snooky Young has a few strong spots. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This session from 1980 helps to recreate the atmosphere of '30s Kansas City. Featured are the great blues singer Joe Turner and the strong singer and altoist Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson, along with the Count Basie Orchestra. "Just a Dream," "Everyday I Have the Blues," "Cherry Red" and "Stormy Monday" receive very spirited renditions, as do some newer blues. Since all of the principals are no longer with us, Norman Granz deserves special thanks for organizing this special session. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1981 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This studio session from 1977 features Count Basie in a quintet with vibraphonist Milt Jackson and guitarist Joe Pass. The predictably excellent group performs spirited versions of some of Basie's "hits" (including "Jive at Five" and "One O'Clock Jump"), some blues and a few standards. It is always interesting to hear Basie in a hornless setting like this one where he gets opportunities to stretch out on the piano. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1965 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
At the 1957 Newport Jazz Festival, the music was consistently inspired and often historic. Count Basie welcomed back tenor great Lester Young and singer Jimmy Rushing for part of a very memorable set highlighted by "Boogie Woogie" and "Evenin'"; Young plays beautifully throughout and Rushing is in prime form. An exciting full-length version of "One O'Clock Jump" features Young, Illinois Jacquet, and trumpeter Roy Eldridge; the Basie band stretches out on "Swingin' at Newport"; and five previously unreleased selections (put out for the first time on this CD) include four Joe Williams vocals. It's a great set of music. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1986 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This typically enjoyable Basie all-star jam is particularly noteworhty because it includes the great (but underrated) tenor of Budd Johnson along with Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis and trumpeters Clark Terry and Harry "Sweets" Edison. The music is quite delightful, topped by a fine ballad medley. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$12.99

R&B - Released September 10, 1993 | Reprise

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Joe Williams' debut as the featured vocalist in Count Basie's band was one of those landmark moments that even savvy observers don't fully appreciate when it occurs, then realize years later how momentous an event they witnessed. Williams brought a different presence to the great Basie orchestra than the one Jimmy Rushing provided; he couldn't shout like Rushing, but he was more effective on romantic and sentimental material, while he was almost as spectacular on surging blues, up-tempo wailers, and stomping standards. Basie's band maintained an incredible groove behind Williams, who moved from authoritative statements on "Every Day I Have the Blues" and "Please Send Me Someone to Love" to brisk workouts on "Roll 'Em Pete" and his definitive hit, "All Right, OK, You Win." © Ron Wynn /TiVo
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Blue Note Catalogue

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This campy LP from the 1960s features the Count Basie Orchestra playing ten themes from four early James Bond movies, with arrangements by either Chico O'Farrill or George Williams. While it seems doubtful that Basie added any of this music to his regular band repertoire, his band does its best to do justice to the arrangements. The somewhat monotonous "007" is converted into a dramatic calypso, while "The Golden Horn" is straight-ahead swing and might surprise someone who hadn't seen the film From Russia with Love. But most Basie fans will want to know how the band handled the best-known themes. "Goldfinger" is given a low-key but swinging treatment that has a fine solo by Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, while the foot-patting treatment of "Thunderball" focuses on Marshall Royal's soulful alto sax and a typically sparse Basie solo. Basie devotees who have a fondness for the earliest James Bond films (Dr. No, From Russia with Love, Goldfinger, and Thunderball) might find this surprising LP worth the investment]. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released November 12, 1987 | Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
A fine sampler of the 1939-40 Count Basie orchestra, it features such classic performances as "Dickie's Dream," "Lester Leaps In" and "Tickle Toe." Lester Young and fellow tenor Buddy Tate, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry Edison, and trombonist Dickie Wells all have their chances to star; they can't help swinging with that light but solid Basie rhythm section. Count's Columbia recordings deserve to be reissued in full (with all of the alternate takes), but until CBS gets around to it, this is a good introduction to that period. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released August 13, 2004 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard