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Alternative & Indie - Released March 21, 2006 | Sub Pop Records

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Pop/Rock - Released May 14, 2010 | Columbia

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 11, 2014 | Brown Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 10, 2016 | UMGRI Interscope

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Rock - Released October 9, 2007 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released March 21, 2006 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2012 | Columbia

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After key Band of Horses influence Neil Young experienced his commercial peak with Harvest -- the 1972 country rock cornerstone -- he famously reflected that it had put him in the middle of the road and that he soon “headed for the ditch.” On Mirage Rock -- the follow-up to the Ben Bridwell-fronted act’s Grammy-nominated, game-changing 2010 release, Infinite Arms -- Band of Horses keep a safe distance from the ditch with the help of producer Glyn Johns. As it happens, he’s the very man who helped the 1972-1973 period Eagles lineup hone their saccharine, radio-friendly and harmony-laden sound while Young was exploring comparatively rugged and less-traveled terrain. Seemingly enlisted to consolidate the success of the self-produced Infinite Arms, Johns brings a great deal of experience to Mirage Rock. Production-wise, while Infinite Arms was layered and cavernous, Mirage Rock has a heart-on-sleeve immediacy to it, borne out of Johns’ insistence that the band deliver well-rehearsed live takes of much of the material. However, while their third record flowed effortlessly, the ebb of Mirage Rock is, to some extent, compromised by an earnest attempt to showcase the band’s eclecticism. The strong opening trio of tracks -- the pounding, lo -fi indie rock of “Knock Knock,” the striking Jayhawks-inspired country pop of “How to Live,” and the laid-back, melancholic West Coast haze of “Slow Cruel Hands of Time” -- are contrasting but inspired choices for the album’s front end. However, the mid-set “Dumpster World” -- sonically closer to a pastiche of George Martin’s America than the Eagles -- has its understated sarcasm crushed by a chugging alt-rock mid-section. Similarly, while Bridwell’s uptempo and overtly political “Feud” approximates Graham Nash fronting the Foo Fighters, it sits awkwardly between the bluegrass-tinged “Everything’s Gonna Be Undone” and the truly beautiful, strolling Buffalo Springfield nod “Long Vows.” All in all, though, it’s the pros that outweigh the cons here. Bridwell’s natural gift for melody is given room to shine throughout and is complemented by some of the finest, most spine-tingling harmonies among the band and their contemporaries. There’s also a playful sense of humor evident here on tracks such as “A Little Biblical,” which can sometimes be lacking in the music of Fleet Foxes, Kings of Leon, and their ilk. In addition, Bridwell shows that he can match Robin Pecknold lyrically on “Slow Cruel Hands of Time,” a sincere, heartfelt rumination on growing old that takes in the grandeur of “the sky…in the yard” and the minutiae of stumbling across “a big city man” he used “to rumble with…back in high school.” Overall, though, while Mirage Rock sees Band of Horses further immerse themselves in Americana, more than anything it finds them enraptured by the simple joy of music-making. “Electric Music” -- a freewheeling slice of Stones/Creedence-inspired rock -- encapsulates this premise and finds them “traveling the open road” without a ditch in sight. © James Wilkinson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 10, 2016 | UMGRI Interscope

When they pegged studio legend Glyn Johns to helm 2012's Mirage Rock, Band of Horses underwent a bit of retooling to ignite some latent rock spark while still offering enough mainstream appeal to sustain them at Columbia Records. While not an overwhelming critical success, the album's easy-riding country-rock vibes were enough to vault it into a significant Top 20 placing on Billboard's pop chart. For their follow-up, 2016's Why Are You OK, they hand over the keys to a less-proven and more experimentally oriented captain in Grandaddy frontman Jason Lytle. Along with this sonic shift comes a new partnership with Interscope and American Recordings, offering a change of scenery and a bit of gentle guidance from American honcho -- and executive producer -- Rick Rubin. Tonally, Why Are You OK is a different animal than its predecessor, often placing frontman Ben Bridwell's warm exaltations within the pseudo-synthetic context of droning synth layers and effect-laden atmospherica. Album-opener "Dull Times/The Moon" is a slow-building seven-minute opus whose dreamy space-crawl eventually gives way to a typhoon of heavy, distorted guitars. Gentle synths and the scuffed sound of an old drum machine are threaded throughout the catchy, J Mascis-aided "In a Drawer," building into swirling layers of harmony and textured guitars. There's even a spaced-out Lytle-penned instrumental that acts as a sort of mid-album interlude. Lyrically, themes of encroaching middle age and the contentment of family life provide much of the album's emotional arc, and while it would be easy to accuse Bridwell of descending into the musical comfort zone that often gets unfairly labeled as "Dad Rock," he's writing from an honest place about the life he's living. Twelve years into their career, Band of Horses are a recognizable, well-established touring act whom Bridwell has shepherded from humble Seattle origins to quite respectable heights. Maybe they're not a household name, but by most bands' standards, these guys have made it and standout cuts, like the hooky lead single "Casual Party" and guitarist Tyler Ramsey's breezy "Country Teen," are a big part of the reason why. © Timothy Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 22, 2015 | Sub Pop Records

Alternative & Indie - Released July 10, 2012 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 6, 2013 | Brown Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 25, 2014 | Brown Records

Alternative & Indie - Released April 13, 2010 | Brown - Fat Possum - Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released July 20, 2012 | Columbia