Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Original Jazz Classics

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
By the time of this, Art Pepper's tenth recording as a leader, he was making his individual voice on the alto saxophone leave the cozy confines of his heroes Charlie Parker and Lee Konitz. Joining the Miles Davis rhythm section of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones made the transformation all that more illuminating. It's a classic east meets west, cool plus hot but never lukewarm combination that provides many bright moments for the quartet during this exceptional date from that great year in music, 1957. A bit of a flip, loosened but precise interpretation of the melody on "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" gets the ball rolling, followed by a "Bags Groove" parallel with "Red Pepper Blues," and a delicate, atypical treatment of "Imagination." A compositional collaboration of Pepper and Chambers on the quick "Waltz Me Blues" and hard-edged, running-as-fast-as-he-can take of "Straight Life" really sets the gears whirring. Philly Joe Jones is a great bop drummer, no doubt, one of the all-time greats with Kenny Clarke and Max Roach. His crisp Latin-to-swing pace for "Tin Tin Deo" deserves notice, masterful in its creation and seamlessness. Pepper makes a typical "Star Eyes" brighter, and he goes into a lower octave tone, more like a tenor, for "Birks Works" and the bonus track "The Man I Love." It's clear he has heard his share of Stan Getz in this era. Though Art Pepper played with many a potent trio, this one inspires him to the maximum, and certainly makes for one of his most substantive recordings after his initial incarcerations, and before his second major slip into the deep abyss of drug addiction. ~ Michael G. Nastos
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Ever since Artie Shaw and Charlie Parker, most jazz musicians have had a desire to record at least once in their lives with strings, often considering it a prestigious honor. Altoist Art Pepper finally had his chance on this album and fortunately the string arrangements (by Bill Holman and Jimmy Bond) do not weigh down the proceedings. Pepper sounds quite inspired performing seven strong compositions highlighted by Hoagy Carmichael's "Winter Moon," "When the Sun Comes Out" and a clarinet feature on "Blues in the Night." This material (plus four alternate takes and two other songs from the same sessions) is included in the massive Art Pepper Galaxy box set. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1957 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Concord Records

HI-RES$36.99
CD$31.99

Jazz - Released September 13, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

Hi-Res
Saxophonist Art Pepper's career was in its final comeback phase in 1979 when he accepted producer John Snyder's invitation to record an album on his fledgling Artists House label. A West Coast jazz star in the '50s, Pepper had suffered from bouts with drug abuse and subsequent incarceration that left him largely marginalized by the '70s. However, after going through rehab and meeting his wife and manager Laurie Pepper, he enjoyed a fruitful late-career resurgence. It is that resurgent period that is showcased on Omnivore's superb 2019 anthology Promise Kept: The Complete Artists House Recordings. Produced by Laurie Pepper and Omnivore founder Cheryl Pawleski, Promise Kept brings together all of the tracks the saxophonist recorded for Artists House including for 1980's So in Love, The New York Album, Artworks, and Stardust, all of which were later released in the mid-'80s on Galaxy Records. Also included are over 20 previously unreleased takes culled from the original sessions. All of these tracks came out of separate 1979 sessions: one in New York with bassist Ron Carter, pianist Hank Jones, and drummer Al Foster, and several in Los Angeles with pianist George Cables, bassist Charlie Haden, and drummer Billy Higgins. Purportedly, there was some tension between Art and the New York guys in part due to tempo choices. Consequently, tracks like "Yesterday" and Pepper's own "Diane" off So in Love, have a nervous electricity that makes them compelling decades later. More relaxed are the West Coast tracks off So in Love, including "Blues for Blanche" and "Stardust," which find Pepper striking a balance between his classic West Coast lyricism and his late-career love of bluesy, Coltrane-influenced lines. The rest of the sessions follow accordingly as Pepper spars his way through nervy renditions of "A Night in Tunisia," "Straight, No Chaser," and his own "My Friend John" on the New York Album. Conversely, the Los Angeles dates that make up Artworks and Stardust are more relaxed, featuring buoyant takes of "Desafinado" and a rare clarinet performance of "Anthropology." There are also several solo tracks featured throughout the collection including fluid, bop-inflected takes on "Body and Soul" and "You Go to My Head" off Artworks, and a starkly soulful reading of "In a Mellow Tone" on the previously unreleased Sessions disc. As with much of Pepper's later work, the Artists House sessions are marked by his earthy lyricism and hardwon soulfulness; a sound borne out of his decades-long descent into drug addiction and a renewed desire to again prove his mettle alongside the jazz greats. Tragically, he died only three years after making these recordings, leaving Laurie Pepper to issue the bulk of these tracks posthumously. Promise Kept is a testament to their comeback achievement. ~ Matt Collar
CD$76.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records

Altoist Art Pepper was at the height of his career during his final five years. A brilliant improviser in the 1950s, by the late '70s the many dark experiences he had had in life were reflected in a deep emotional intensity in his playing. He played each solo as if it might be his last and his passion was brutally honest. This giant 16-CD Galaxy set features Pepper at the peak of his powers. Most of the performances are in a quartet setting, although this collection also includes a session with strings, five unaccompanied alto solos (he also plays clarinet on a few tracks), and a pair of CDs in which Pepper performs duets with pianist George Cables. Although more general collectors may want to acquire some of the individual sessions first (most of which are available separately on CD), the more dedicated jazz fans are advised to save their money and acquire this essential package. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$50.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2017 | Craft Recordings

CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Blue Note Records

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released June 30, 2009 | Original Jazz Classics

Booklet
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records

As a sort of follow-up to Art Pepper's matchup with Miles Davis' trio in the 1957 classic Art Pepper Meets the Rhythm Section, Pepper utilizes Davis' sidemen on this 1960 near-classic. In addition to pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb, trumpeter Conte Candoli makes the group a quintet on four of the eight numbers. This time around, rather than emphasizing standards, Pepper performs just three ("Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise," Thelonious Monk's "Rhythm-A-Ning," and "The Way You Look Tonight") and includes three originals of his own: "Diane," "Bijou the Poodle," and "Gettin' Together." The music is all very straight-ahead and bop-oriented, but as usual, Pepper brings something very personal and unique to his playing; he sounds like no one else. [Some reissues add "The Way You Look Tonight" (formerly only available on another LP) and an alternate take of the title cut to the original repertoire.] ~ Scott Yanow
CD$18.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Blue Note Records

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Fantasy Records

CD$12.99

Bebop - Released September 29, 2017 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
CD$12.99

Bebop - Released September 29, 2017 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
CD$16.49

Bebop - Released February 3, 2017 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Concord Records, Inc.

Altoist Art Pepper recorded many albums for the Galaxy label during 1979-1982. Straight Life is pretty definitive and serves as a perfect introduction to Pepper's second (and most rewarding) period. Not only is there a superior version of Pepper's famous title cut but very emotional (and explorative) renditions of "September Song" and "Nature Boy." The quartet also featured pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Red Mitchell, and drummer Billy Higgins. Brilliant music. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Original Jazz Classics

Despite his very erratic lifestyle, altoist Art Pepper never made a bad record. This collection is better than most. The first four titles team together Pepper with tenor saxophonist Warne Marsh, pianist Ronnie Ball, bassist Ben Tucker, and drummer Gary Frommer for generally intriguing explorations of four standards. One can feel the influence of Lennie Tristano (with Pepper in Lee Konitz's place), although Pepper had his own sound and a more hard-swinging style. The success of the Pepper-Marsh front line makes one wish that they had recorded together again. The other three selections are leftovers from a trio of classic Pepper albums, and all are quite worthwhile. Pepper is heard backed by three separate rhythm sections, which include pianists Red Garland, Dolo Coker, or Wynton Kelly; either Paul Chambers or Jimmy Bond on bass; and Philly Joe Jones, Frank Butler, or Jimmy Cobb on drums. Overall, this album sticks to bop standards and finds Art Pepper in top form. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released June 15, 1956 | Savoy

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Original Jazz Classics

Essential Standards highlights OJC/Contemporary/Galaxy recordings made over the course of three decades by alto saxophonist Art Pepper. The majority of these ten tracks feature Pepper playing his main instrument, with the exception of "Move," where he switches to tenor, while picking up the clarinet for "Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)." These tracks emphasize Pepper's ability to make every performance his own, no matter how many times he had played them. While there is nothing here the jazz collector doesn't already own, Essential Standards provides a decent sampling for the curious listener at a mid-line price. ~ Al Campbell