Similar artists

Albums

$17.49
$12.99

Classical - Released April 5, 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
In Circles is the seventh album from British-Australian saxophonist Amy Dickson. Featuring resonant brass melodies, calming piano, and romantic ambience, the effort follows her 2017 album Glass. The LP was released on Sony Classical. ~ Rob Wacey
$12.99

Classical - Released January 27, 2017 | Sony Classical

Booklet
$12.99

Classical - Released September 27, 2013 | Sony Classical

$12.99

Classical - Released July 11, 2014 | Sony Classical

$12.99

Classical - Released May 9, 2008 | RCA Red Seal

$12.99

Classical - Released August 31, 2009 | RCA Red Seal

$12.99

Classical - Released January 24, 2014 | Sony Classical

$12.99

Classical - Released January 27, 2017 | Sony Classical

After the success of her album of music by Philip Glass, John Tavener, and Michael Nyman, saxophonist Amy Dickson turns here to Glass exclusively. This is, as she points out in her own notes, an expanded technical challenge, demanding circular breathing and a great deal of sheer stamina. The music is all arranged for saxophone, in the case of the violin sonata and violin concerto by Dickson herself (the selections from the film score The Hours are by her husband, who worked from Glass' handwritten score -- a form of endorsement). Glass has made fewer alternate versions of his own works than has Arvo Pärt, but the logic supporting such treatment is the same: new light is cast on the planes and pillars that, aurora-like, make up the structure of the music. And here, a new technical element is added. Dickson indicates that the violin sonata, with its near-constant motion for the saxophone, was the more difficult of the two works technically, but it is satisfying likewise in purely musical terms: the saxophone adds new small accents that are fundamental to the experience of Glass' music. The concerto is also nicely done: the Royal Philharmonic under Mikel Toms creates the liquid orchestral sound Glass seems to favor in the recordings on his own Orange Mountain Music label. This may seem a project that's ancillary to Glass' main output, but Dickson makes a good case that it is instead an unexplored avenue of its development. Kudos to Sony for taking a chance here.
$12.99

Classical - Released April 19, 2013 | Sony Classical

In its classic mixture of classical favorites and popular songs, and in its unrelenting romantic mood as well, this release by Amy Dickson is entirely typical of major-label efforts to reach Britain's large crossover market. Its lead instrument, however, is not so typical: the saxophone, although one of pop's premier instruments, is a rare find in the concert sphere. Dickson does not really attempt to exploit this tension; her classical works are all arrangements, and her pop songs, until the very lightly jazzified reading of Harry Warren's I Only Have Eyes for You (track 11), don't make use of the saxophone's jazz capabilities. Even Smoke Gets in Your Eyes is played pretty much straight. Instead, you get an unbroken series of slow tunes that, to quote the booklet's sparse text (it's mostly given over the gauzy shots of Dickson), offer "the sound of sensuality, elegance and romance." Some of them are unconventional enough to be engaging; it's undeniably fun to hear Bellini's "Casta diva" played on a saxophone. Others, notably Tom Waits' In the Neighborhood, gain nothing from being played this way. Three works on the album are famous film themes, which split the difference between the classical and pop realms and are probably the most effective works on the disc. Producer James McMillan and his minions contribute reliably lush arrangements. In general this release will appeal to crossover lovers who have enjoyed hours of consuming codes of pure romance and want more of the same; others may find it less interesting.
$12.99

Classical - Released January 8, 2016 | Sony Classical

This album by Australian saxophonist Amy Dickson was originally issued by Australia's ABC Classics; it was picked up by Sony Classical and given cheesy graphics that for American listeners of a certain age may bring to mind the Bo Derek film 10. That is the end of the list of complaints about this extraordinary release, which offers music that will be unfamiliar to nearly all but Australian listeners (and perhaps many of those) and yet is compelling from beginning to end. This is contemporary virtuoso music of the highest order. Two of the three works here were written for Dickson herself, and they exploit every conventional capability of the saxophone (they don't enter the realm of extended technique, but the sound palette is so varied, you might think they do). The third work, The Siduri Dances of Brett Dean, is a transcribed work originally for flute and orchestra; Dickson is inventive indeed in devising saxophone equivalents for various flute sounds. All three works have programmatic significance. The titular Island Songs of Peter Sculthorpe was one of the last works of the late Australian composer; it includes the Aboriginal influences found in his other works and is endlessly novel in the ways it incorporates the saxophone into drone textures. The final Full Moon Dances: Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra is perhaps the most extraordinary of all. Recorded live, it generated enthusiastic applause at the end of its exuberant Bartókian finale. Sample the slow movement "Sanctus" for trance-like textures that show just how subtle Dickson can be in her pianissimo mode. The Sydney Symphony under a couple of conductors offers able support, and all in all this is an extraordinary release from Australia.
$1.49

Classical - Released September 19, 2014 | Sony Classical