Albums

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R&B - Released May 17, 2010 | Bad Boy - Wondaland

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music - Sélection Les Inrocks
$14.49

R&B - Released June 17, 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
Jill Scott has been through many changes since 2007's The Real Thing: Words & Sounds, Vol. 3: a divorce, a brief but intense love affair that produced a child, acting roles in Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married? and Hounddog, her starring role in HBO's The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, and signing with Warner Bros. The Light of the Sun is a record of the rocky road to empowerment. Scott and Lee Hutson, Jr. are the album's executive producers; they also collaborate in songwriting and arrangements on numerous selections. Opener "Blessed," produced by Dre & Vidal, kicks it off in slippery, hip-hop soul style; a harp, strings, and a fluttering dubwise bassline underscore the shuffling rhythm. Scott expresses spoken and sung gratitude for and about her new baby, career, life, and support system. Poetry and song are woven with elegance in a nocturnal groove. The hit pre-release single "So in Love," produced by Kelvin Wooten, is a modern Philly soul fan's dream, with its lithe, fingerpopping bassline, shimmering drums, and seeming bliss arising between Scott and Anthony Hamilton, who turn in a grand duet performance. "Shame" (featuring Eve & the A Group), is grand, old-school funk with killer backing vocals that range from P-Funk-esque vocal choruses to doo wop with sampled classic ska as Scott raps defiantly with Eve. One of the sleepers on the set is the stunning "La Boom Vent Suite," a sultry number produced by Scott and Hutson. It's a militant, funky soul, kiss-off tune, that declares: "I've been waiting for so long/but somebody else has been sniffing at my dress." "Hear My Call" is literally a prayer for healing; with its elegantly arranged strings, it's as heartfelt and humble as desperate need can be. There is one misstep here: "So Gone (What My Mind Says)" didn't require Paul Wall's tired, generic, boastful rapping to work. That said, the rhythm collision with human beatbox Doug E. Fresh on "All Cried Out Redux," complete with ragtime piano sample, is a novelty number that works. After the album's first third, it's all Scott, and (mostly) all sublime. The sparsely produced "Quick" (produced by Wayne Campbell) records the heartbreak in the brief relationship that produced her son. "Making You Wait" is another self-determination anthem that addresses romance, with spacious Rhodes and synth strings weaving beats together. Scott lays down the spoken word "Womanifesto" that recalls the poetry of her early career, just before the steamy, sexual "Rolling Hills" touches on jazz, blues, and late-'70s soul with effortless ease to close it. On The Light of the Sun, Scott sounds more in control than ever; her spoken and sung phrasing (now a trademark), songwriting, and production instincts are all solid. This is 21st century Philly soul at its best. ~ Thom Jurek
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R&B - Released June 17, 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
Jill Scott has been through many changes since 2007's The Real Thing: Words & Sounds, Vol. 3: a divorce, a brief but intense love affair that produced a child, acting roles in Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married? and Hounddog, her starring role in HBO's The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, and signing with Warner Bros. The Light of the Sun is a record of the rocky road to empowerment. Scott and Lee Hutson, Jr. are the album's executive producers; they also collaborate in songwriting and arrangements on numerous selections. Opener "Blessed," produced by Dre & Vidal, kicks it off in slippery, hip-hop soul style; a harp, strings, and a fluttering dubwise bassline underscore the shuffling rhythm. Scott expresses spoken and sung gratitude for and about her new baby, career, life, and support system. Poetry and song are woven with elegance in a nocturnal groove. The hit pre-release single "So in Love," produced by Kelvin Wooten, is a modern Philly soul fan's dream, with its lithe, fingerpopping bassline, shimmering drums, and seeming bliss arising between Scott and Anthony Hamilton, who turn in a grand duet performance. "Shame" (featuring Eve & the A Group), is grand, old-school funk with killer backing vocals that range from P-Funk-esque vocal choruses to doo wop with sampled classic ska as Scott raps defiantly with Eve. One of the sleepers on the set is the stunning "La Boom Vent Suite," a sultry number produced by Scott and Hutson. It's a militant, funky soul, kiss-off tune, that declares: "I've been waiting for so long/but somebody else has been sniffing at my dress." "Hear My Call" is literally a prayer for healing; with its elegantly arranged strings, it's as heartfelt and humble as desperate need can be. There is one misstep here: "So Gone (What My Mind Says)" didn't require Paul Wall's tired, generic, boastful rapping to work. That said, the rhythm collision with human beatbox Doug E. Fresh on "All Cried Out Redux," complete with ragtime piano sample, is a novelty number that works. After the album's first third, it's all Scott, and (mostly) all sublime. The sparsely produced "Quick" (produced by Wayne Campbell) records the heartbreak in the brief relationship that produced her son. "Making You Wait" is another self-determination anthem that addresses romance, with spacious Rhodes and synth strings weaving beats together. Scott lays down the spoken word "Womanifesto" that recalls the poetry of her early career, just before the steamy, sexual "Rolling Hills" touches on jazz, blues, and late-'70s soul with effortless ease to close it. On The Light of the Sun, Scott sounds more in control than ever; her spoken and sung phrasing (now a trademark), songwriting, and production instincts are all solid. This is 21st century Philly soul at its best. ~ Thom Jurek
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R&B - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
At a concert held at Herndon Stadium in Atlanta on May 28, 1959, Ray Charles turns in a blistering version of "What'd I Say" and takes on the big-band era with versions of Tommy Dorsey's "Yes Indeed!" and Artie Shaw's "Frenesi," not to mention performances of "The Right Time" and "Tell the Truth." [This album was reissued in 1973 as a part of a two-record set, packaged with Ray Charles at Newport under the title Ray Charles Live (Atlantic 503)]. ~ William Ruhlmann
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R&B - Released April 6, 2018 | Virgin EMI

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Since 2012, Karly-Marina Loaiza alias Kali Uchis has stacked up a collection of "feat.s" to rival the rack of medals across a Soviet general's chest. And so the first album from the Colombian-American, whose voice has featured on tracks by Snoop Dogg, Tyler The Creator, GoldLink, Major Lazer, Kaytranada, Miguel, Vince Staples and Gorillaz was well overdue. Before this release, Kali Uchis had already managed to make plain her strong personality, and her status as another potential new queen of R&B and soul. Wait, another? No, no no. A real queen, single and sovereign, with a voice that mixes neo soul, 90s R&B, early-Madonna-era pop and wit à la Amy Winehouse. Her voice enjoys a five-star setting on this first album, where such stars as Tyler et Damon Albarn rub shoulders, but also the Canadians of BadBadNotGood, Kevin Parker of Tame Impala, David Sitek of TV On The Radio, live wire Thundercat, soul star Jorja Smith, the Dap-Kings, The Internet's Steve Lacey, his compatriot Reykon and legendary funkster Bootsy Collins. On Isolation, the Los Angeles-based singer brings her Latin roots to bear by singing in two languages, slaloming between neo soul, R&B, hip-hop, Latin pop and reggaeton. Through languorous sequences and up-tempo pieces, Uchis shines in all contexts, against all backdrops, to create a record of stunning freshness, never gaudy or mawkish. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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R&B - Released August 28, 2015 | Universal Republic Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards
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R&B - Released March 29, 2013 | Parkwood Entertainment - Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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R&B - Released June 9, 2017 | Top Dawg Entertainment - RCA Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
If Kendrick Lamar, Travis Scott, James Fauntleroy and Isaiah Rashad all crop up on a debut album, it is surely at least worth a listen. Especially if it has been brought out by Top Dawg Entertainment... This record from Solána Row aka SZA has been eagerly-awaited. Signed to TDA for some years, the most exciting R&B singer in the rap'n'soul world today has released a pretty-much-perfect studio album. Alternating between a sensual languor and grooves that float on air, CTRL also possesses an addictive freshness. A real revelation. © MD/Qobuz
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R&B - Released March 25, 1986 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released March 3, 2017 | Sony Music UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released August 30, 2013 | G.O.O.D. Music - Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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R&B - Released March 14, 2014 | Arista - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released January 1, 2005 | Virgin Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
On the cover of her debut, The Soul Sessions, Joss Stone's face is obscured by a vintage microphone, a deliberate move that emphasized the retro-soul vibe of the LP while hiding the youthful face that would have given away that Stone was a mere 16 years old at the time of the album's release. The point was to put the music before the image and it worked, selling the album to an older audience that might have stayed away, thinking that the teenager sang teen pop. If the debut was designed to give Stone credibility, her second album, Mind, Body & Soul, delivered almost exactly a year after its predecessor, is designed to make her a superstar, broadening her appeal without losing sight of the smooth, funky, stylish soul at the core of her sound. There's no radical revision here -- she still works with many of the same musicians she did on The Soul Sessions, including Betty Wright and Little Beaver -- but there are some subtle shifts in tone scattered throughout the record. Certain songs are a little brighter and a little more radio-ready than before, there's a more pronounced hip-hop vibe to some beats, and she sounds a little more like a diva this time around -- not enough to alienate older fans, but enough to win some new ones. The album has a seductive, sultry feel; there's some genuine grit to the rhythms, yet it's all wrapped up in a production that's smooth as silk. By and large, the songs are good, too, sturdily written and hooky, growing in stature with each play. While Stone has developed a tendency to over-sing ever so slightly -- she doesn't grandstand like the post-Mariah divas, but she'll fit more notes than necessary into the simplest phrases -- she nevertheless possesses a rich, resonant voice that's a joy to hear. She may not yet have the set of skills, or the experience, to give a nuanced, textured performance -- one that feels truly lived-in, not just sung -- but she's a compelling singer and Mind, Body & Soul lives up to her promise. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B - Released June 13, 2000 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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R&B - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Released in 1981, Breakin' Away is not only a great follow-up to This Time, it all but perfected the effort. With an amazing batch of songs, producer/artist chemistry, and top-level players, Breakin' Away became the standard bearer of the L.A. pop and R&B sound. "Closer to Your Love" comes off as a tougher, more confident version of the songs from the previous album. However, in short order, Breakin' Away assumes its own identity with brilliant results. Everything works so well here that the hit, the pleasing "We're in This Love Together," comes off as the weak link. "Easy," with its gorgeous and subtle Latin flourishes, has Jarreau's purposeful delivery coming off oddly poignant in its joy and beauty. The bittersweet "My Old Friend" has him giving a charming and understated reading with gorgeous synth signatures that speak volumes. Most of Breakin' Away has Jarreau in great spirits and giving one great performance after another, like the powerful and melody-rich title song. Like his best albums, this gives Jarreau plenty of room to exercise his chops. He struts through the funky and elegant "Roof Garden," and on the impressive "(Round, Round, Round) Blue Rondo a la Turk" he offers great scats and whimsical lyrics. For the final track, Jarreau brings new life to "Teach Me Tonight" and it has a sweeping, dreamy arrangement. Produced by Jay Graydon, Breakin' Away is a great album and informed a lot of Jarreau's subsequent efforts. ~ Jason Elias
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R&B - Released October 20, 2017 | MBK Entertainment - RCA Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards
This release combines the EPs H.E.R., Vol. 1 (released in September 2016) and H.E.R., Vol. 2 (released in June 2017) and adds six new tracks (referred to as B-sides), including "Best Part," a duet that appeared on Daniel Caesar's Freudian. The previously unissued songs are in the same vein as the material on the EPs -- predominantly slow and atmospheric, vulnerable yet assured, verging on mood music but with a little more sonic, melodic, and lyrical substance than the average set from H.E.R.'s stylistic peers.
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R&B - Released June 15, 1976 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
A good session, though the gimmicks are kicking in. ~ Ron Wynn
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R&B - Released January 1, 2006 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released January 1, 2002 | UNI - MOTOWN

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released January 1, 2012 | CP Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music

Genre

R&B in the magazine
  • The Carters are untouchable
    The Carters are untouchable The ultimate luxury for the biggest stars is to be able to randomly release an album without warning. Although much anticipated ever since their first collaboration in 2002, Jay-Z and Beyoncé’s com...
  • TLC, back to the 90’s
    TLC, back to the 90’s T-Boz and Chilli revive the flame of their vintage R&B ...