Albums

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R&B - To be released April 19, 2019 | Nice Life - Atlantic

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R&B - To be released March 1, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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R&B - To be released February 22, 2019 | TSNMI - Atlantic

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R&B - Released February 15, 2019 | Run For Cover Records, LLC

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R&B - Released January 23, 2019 | Bentley Records

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R&B - Released December 28, 2018 | iM Angelo Di Guardo

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R&B - Released January 11, 2019 | GW Entmt

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R&B - Released January 11, 2019 | SinceThe80s, LLC

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R&B - Released January 11, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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R&B - Released January 11, 2019 | Universal Music Enterprises

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R&B - Released December 21, 2018 | Clover Music

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R&B - Released December 21, 2018 | Imilozi Music

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R&B - Released December 21, 2018 | Clover Music

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Kid talent show discovery JoJo's self-titled Blackground Records, Da Family-affiliated debut is a slick set of modern R&B in the vein of Brandy or Monica, with plenty of room to introduce its star's bigger-than-you'd-think presence. A bank of producers -- Vincent Herbert, Soulshock, Bink -- provide backgrounds that bump decidedly in the midrange -- there's a conscious effort to keep the focus on JoJo, and not whatever beats are currently making the grade. In other words, her vocals never sound detached from the goings-on behind her, or just a voice chattering over R&B generica. And this is promising, as the young singer really does have a tremendous voice. "Breezy" and "Homeboy" multi-track her trills, sulky whispers, and brassy wails over clicky percussion and a mixture of loops and instrumental snippets. Throughout there's talk of sheezies, throwbacks in the mix, cell phones, and the boy next door jilting poor JoJo. But even if the lyrics throughout are pretty interchangeable, vocally there's no doubt in her ability to carry the album, and the lack of irritating skits or attention-hogging guest shots is pretty refreshing. The funky jook of the Reggie and Ronald Burrell production "City Lights" features a few random "JoJo do that thing" drop-ins, but the girl gets right to the bottom of that freaky Beyoncé id, and aligns the cut with fellow standout "Not That Kinda Girl." Lead single "Leave (Get Out)" doesn't have a lot of staying power, but its guitar figure is a nice touch, and the chorus hits with the right amount of tell-off brashness. There's also a serviceable update of the 1992 SWV hit "Weak," the stripped-down strut of "Yes or No" (is that real beat boxing?), and the requisite ballad in "Never Say Goodbye." All in all, JoJo is a strong debut. Its centerpiece is never smothered with collabo pile-ons, and she's served well by the mix of arrangements and backgrounds. She's definitely courting middle-lane accessibility, but she rightly lets her singing do the talking, and that's a signal of where she's headed. ~ Johnny Loftus
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R&B - Released December 17, 2010 | iM Tammy Lynn Wilson

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R&B - Released December 14, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

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R&B - Released December 7, 2018 | Muhabbet84

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R&B - Released December 7, 2018 | Craft Recordings

Ric & Ron were a pair of twin record labels run by New Orleans R&B impresario Joe Ruffino between 1958 and 1962. During their brief lifespan, Ric & Ron recorded many of the greatest artists in the Crescent City, names that would soon become legends: Professor Longhair, Eddie Bo, Chris Kenner, Robert Parker, Tommy Ridgley, and, for the first time anywhere, Irma Thomas and Johnny Adams. Apart from "You Talk Too Much," a smiling shuffle by Joe Jones which went all the way to number three on Billboard in 1960, none of these singles made waves nationally, but they became ingrained in the lore of New Orleans. As record producer Scott Billington points out in his liner notes, Ric & Ron existed in the brief period between two celebrated eras in New Orleans R&B: the Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew reign of the '50s and Allen Toussaint's imperial phase of the '60s. Ruffino hired Harold Battiste, Edgar Blanchard, and Mac Rebennack (later known as Dr. John) to give Ric & Ron a looser, grittier feel that contrasted with the house bands led by such other producers as Cosimo Matassa. Listening to Feelin' Right Saturday Night: The Ric & Ron Anthology -- a generous 28-track anthology released by Craft Records -- this distinction is immediately apparent. While nearly every track is recognizably New Orleans, there are a great variety of sounds, ranging from Adams' silken touch to Mercy Baby's wild, careening "My Party." Most of these cuts exist in a middle ground between these two extremes, boasting finesse in the writing and singing but a kinetic kick in the instrumentation. To seasoned record collectors, a lot of these songs will be familiar -- there are two previously unreleased cuts, Eddie Bo's "Good Enough for Me" and a demo version of Professor Longhair's standard "Tipitina"; almost everything else can be found on Ace's two-volume You Talk Too Much: The Ric & Ron Story -- but it's a blessing to have a concise single-disc collection of Ric & Ron's best. Not only does it provide an excellent introduction to these seminal R&B labels, it provides a never-ending party. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B - Released December 7, 2018 | Perspective Records

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R&B - Released November 28, 2018 | Adriana Terrén

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R&B - Released November 29, 2018 | Atlantic Records

Genre

R&B in the magazine
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