Albums

84027 albums sorted by Bestsellers and filtered by Jazz
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Vocal Jazz - Released May 4, 2018 | Silvertone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Qobuzissime
She loves Madeleine Peyroux and Melody Gardot and she doesn't care who knows it. But Hailey Tuck does have a little something of her own up her sleeve. It's a personal touch that makes this young Texan, who has made landfall in Paris, an attractive voice in its own right, and not a pale imitation of anyone else. Larry Klein, who produced her two idols, even agreed to put together the first album of this starlet who shares a hairdresser with Louise Brooks, and a wardrobe with Josephine Baker. Klein even put together a perfect and never over-produced backdrop, with the help of some five-star studio musicians like drummer Jay Bellerose (Elton John, Robert Plant) and guitarist Dean Parks (Joe Cocker, Steely Dan)… In terms of their repertoire, the eclecticism and quality of these covers also displays thoroughgoing good taste. And the fact that she revisits That Don't Make It Junk by Leonard Cohen, Cry To Me, made famous Solomon Burke, Cactus Tree by Joni Mitchell, Some Other Time by Leonard Bernstein, Underwear by Pulp, Alcohol by the Kinks, Junk by Paul McCartney, I Don’t Care Much from the soundtrack to Cabaret and indeed the wonderful Say You Don’t Mind by Colin Blunstone, Hailey Tuck deploys her voice intelligently and with a dash of retro in every word and every phrase. Let this beautiful and timeless Qobuzissime carry you away... © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released February 9, 2018 | Decca (UMO)

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In four albums, Worrisome Heart (2008), My One And Only Thrill (2009), The Absence (2012) and Currency Of Man (2015), Melody Gardot has managed to sneak in between Diana Krall and Norah Jones to also find her place in the selective club of the female singers that are “a bit jazzy but not too much”, this oneiric cast that was so popular during the 50s, and in which she soon made the singularity of her very sensual voice resonate. A voice that she ceaselessly took touring to locations all over the world, and multiple times over at that. And so, there are enough recordings in the cellar to release a live album. However, live discs are rarely a must. There is often something missing, this small impalpable thing, that only those present that night will have kept inside of them… This Live In Europe from Melody Gardot is lucky to have kept, precisely, this “small thing”… The American has probably meticulously built it (apparently, she has listened to more than 300 recordings before making her decision!) by avoiding the true-false best of. “Someday, someone told me, ‘never look back, because there’s no way you’re going back’, she says. It’s nicely said, but if you don’t look back sometimes, it’s hard to see that time is on the verge of catching up to you. We all need to quickly look back into the rear-view mirror from time to time in order to adjust our trajectory. This disc is precisely that, the rear-view mirror of a 1963 Corvette, a postcard of our touring all over Europe. We spent most of our time on the road these last few years, and we’ve taken advantage of this trip to not only get around and get some fresh air but also to try, as much as possible, to get rid of the rules and create something exciting. I’ve been dreaming for years of releasing a live album like this one.” This desire can be felt in every moment of this disc comprised of titles recorded in Paris, Vienna, Bergen, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Barcelona, Lisbon, Zurich and London. Whether she performs her hits Baby I'm A Fool and My One And Only Thrill or covers the classic Over The Rainbow, Melody Gardot offers up a different point of view, but it’s always an open performance. To help her in her introspective trip that is constantly shifting, she is surrounded by her impeccable musicians, discreet but decisive. Drummer Charles Staab, saxophonist Irwin Hall and bass player Sami Minaie are completely in tune with her singing, like some kind of thin hand that you take and only let go of after the last note. Finally, there is this album cover which will lead to extensive press coverage… or not. © MD/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note

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Norah Jones' debut on Blue Note is a mellow, acoustic pop affair with soul and country overtones, immaculately produced by the great Arif Mardin. (It's pretty much an open secret that the 22-year-old vocalist and pianist is the daughter of Ravi Shankar.) Jones is not quite a jazz singer, but she is joined by some highly regarded jazz talent: guitarists Adam Levy, Adam Rogers, Tony Scherr, Bill Frisell, and Kevin Breit; drummers Brian Blade, Dan Rieser, and Kenny Wollesen; organist Sam Yahel; accordionist Rob Burger; and violinist Jenny Scheinman. Her regular guitarist and bassist, Jesse Harris and Lee Alexander, respectively, play on every track and also serve as the chief songwriters. Both have a gift for melody, simple yet elegant progressions, and evocative lyrics. (Harris made an intriguing guest appearance on Seamus Blake's Stranger Things Have Happened.) Jones, for her part, wrote the title track and the pretty but slightly restless "Nightingale." She also includes convincing readings of Hank Williams' "Cold Cold Heart," J.D. Loudermilk's "Turn Me On," and Hoagy Carmichael's "The Nearness of You." There's a touch of Rickie Lee Jones in Jones' voice, a touch of Bonnie Raitt in the arrangements; her youth and her piano skills could lead one to call her an Alicia Keys for grown-ups. While the mood of this record stagnates after a few songs, it does give a strong indication of Jones' alluring talents. ~ David R. Adler
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Vocal Jazz - Released September 14, 2018 | Verve

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Two generations. Two styles. Two voices. And an album in common… For about twenty years, crooner Tony Bennett and singer and pianist Diana Krall had produced a few duos here and there, but never an entire album. With this Love Is Here To Stay, they jumped right in and involved another five-star tandem in their enchanted parenthesis of refined vocal jazz: George and Ira Gershwin. They went digging through the vast repertoire of the most famous brothers of 20th American popular music to create this album that seems from another time, produced with the trio of impeccable pianist Bill Charlap, Peter Washington on the double bass and Kenny Washington on drums… Tackling the Great American Songbook is always a redeeming and almost necessary baptism of fire for any worthy jazz singer. And these two didn’t wait for 2018 to do it. Here, each one excels in what they do best, even if, at 92 years of age, Tony Bennett obviously doesn’t have the same organ as he did when he sung I Left My Heart In San Francisco, which made him popular in 1962. Sinatra’s favourite singer knows it, and manages to find a range in line with his vocal condition. The result is particularly touching. A great professional, Diana Krall adapted her singing to the New Yorker, turning their exchanges into endearing, slightly retro flirting. The 38 years between them become the main asset of an old-fashioned yet delightful album. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released April 6, 2018 | Okeh

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
They knew what they were doing when they named this record Nordub. Nor for North, represented here by Nils Petter Molvaer. In 1997, when the label ECM brought out the stunning album Khmer, this Norwegian trumpeter shook the jazz world by bringing electronic music into his atmospheric musical world. Nor is also his fellow countryman, guitarist Eivind Aarset and Finnish electro-tinkerer and DJ Vladislav Delay. As for the three letters of Dub, they stand for the genre's most classic duo: Sly Dunbar on drums and bassist Robbie Shakespeare. In 2016, this motley crew made up of the Jamaican tandem and Nils Petter Molvaer hit the stage. It was quite a warm-up for their studio session in Oslo. In essence, Molvaer's world has always been a hybrid, bringing together textures that were never exclusively jazz. His playing style uses different atmospheric controls without ever losing the creative strength of his improvisations or compositions. Here, the trumpeter even works his way into the unique Sly & Robbie sound with a perfectly natural air. And that is surely the strength of Nordub. No-one takes over, or tries to overpower the other. The fusion is total, and sincere. We even feel that our two old Jamaican long-distance travellers have strayed out of their normal comfort zone to take part actively in this music as it takes shape. Just like Aarset and Delay's work, every part is a vital component of the final result. Together, our five sound adventurers produce a fine symphony of truly singular dub and jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 29, 1958 | Fontana

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released August 31, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Fifteen years on from Changing Places, his first album for the label ECM, Tord Gustavsen is once again offering up an album performed with a trio, which seems to be the line-up most in keeping with his jarrettian tendencies. With his trusty drummer Jarle Vespestad and Sigurd Hole on double bass (replacing Harald Johnsen who passed away in 2011), the Oslo pianist mixes original compositions with Norwegian folk standards and even pieces by Bach. He ties together these apparently disparate themes with lyricism, and with a groove that's all his own. What makes The Other Side even more thrilling is the perfect unison between the players. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released May 5, 2017 | Verve

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What better way of making a new record than surrounding yourself with new collaborators? That was the idea that Youn Sun Nah had for She Moves On. Four years after Lento, the Korean singer has taken on a close-knit group comprising John Zorn, Jamie Saft on the piano, the Hammond organ, the Fender Rhodes and the Wurlitzer (he also produced the record), and Brad Jones on the bass alongside drummer Dan Rieser, who worked with Norah Jones in Little Willies. But it is above all the presence of the guitarist Marc Ribot on five of these eleven tracks that draws attention. Surrounded by these four strong personalities, Youn Sun Nah explores a fairly varied repertoire that owes as much to rock as to folk, to rhythms as to lyrics, taking in covers of Joni Mitchell (The Dawntreader), Paul Simon (She Moves On), Lou Reed (Teach The Gifted Children), Jimi Hendrix (Drifting with a searing solo from Ribot) or the traditional Black Is The Color Of My True Love’s Hair. Three original compositions, Traveller, Evening Star and Too Late, complete this album which is resolutely inspired by American music and which presents her impressive voice in a context which rightly recalls Norah Jones, or Melody Gardot. But Youn Sun Nah's vocal personality is strong enough that she never seems to be stepping on her illustrious sisters’ toes, and she offers, from the outset, a record that is all her own. © MD/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 9, 2018 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Without being a mandatory baptism of fire, Jean-Sébastien Bach has always been a captivating magnet for many jazz musicians. So much so that people like Jacques Loussier, Keith Jarrett, the Modern Jazz Quartet, Dan Tepfer or Edouard Ferlet to name but a handful, all tackled head on, and for good reason, the work of the Cantor of Leipzig . The choice made by Brad Mehldau is a hybrid. The American pianist does not create here a jazz album strictly speaking - fans of "Jazzy Bach" can go home straight away - but he mixes themes of Bach - four preludes and a fugue - to personal and contemporary pieces; as intriguing answers or mirror games to original works. The exercise is all the more interesting because part of Bach's work took the form of improvisation. As for Mehldau, his style, but also his compositions, have always contained elements echoing the German composer. We know the rhythmic force of Bach's writing that appeals to jazz musicians. But here, the pianist has thought through his record in its entirety, never trying to separate his works from that of the other. The result is therefore confusing at first (especially for those familiar with the preludes and fugues of the original) but fascinating above all else. Because After Bach is anything but an impressive show of class (Brad Mehldau does not need that much, his virtuosity as a great no longer needs to be proven) but rather an exciting reflection on the life of a score through the centuries. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released November 30, 2018 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
In 2017, Gregory Porter released a tribute album - or rather a love letter, to the man he considers his ultimate hero: Nat King Cole. A remarkable musician who weaved his way between pure jazz and easy listening, an innovative and highly skilled pianist-virtuoso, and of course, a captivating singer/crooner with his deep, romantic and velvety voice that set him apart from everyone - this genius had never before been commemorated in so much style. In this live performance recorded on the prestigious stage of the Royal Albert Hall in London, Gregory Porter is supported by his trusty quartet (pianist Chip Crawford, bassist Jahmal Nichols, drummer Emanuel Harrold and saxophonist Tivon Pennicott) as well as by the 70 musicians of the London Studio Orchestra, conducted by Vince Mendoza. He features pieces that are closely associated with Nat King Cole (Mona Lisa, Nature Boy…) but also some of his own compositions ( Hey Laura, When Love Was King, Don’t Lose Your Steam…). Throughout One Night Only it is fascinating to see how Gregory Porter is just as comfortable when singing alongside the sophistication of the string section as he is in the rougher and groovier sequences. A vocal range that makes this show truly magical. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released November 9, 2018 | Decca (UMO)

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Jazz - Released March 2, 2018 | ECM

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"Another live album from Jarrett's trio?" It's hard not to let out a little yelp as the Allentown pianist continues his apparently-infinite discographic march, aided by drummer Jack DeJohnette and bassist Gary Peacock. But after listening to the first-ever release of this concert from 14 November 1998 at Newark's New Jersey Performing Arts Center, you might start to see where producer Manfred Eicher was coming from when he decided to bring this one out. Keith Jarrett even said himself: “I was amazed to hear how well the music worked. For me, it's not only a historical document, but a truly great concert.” As ever, the three friends move quickly through a few classics from the Great American Songbook but also a few wonders by John Coltrane ( Moment’s Notice), Bud Powell (Bouncin' With Bud) and Sonny Rollins (Doxy). Above all, that evening signalled that Keith Jarrett was back in business after two years spent offstage for health reasons. From 1996 to 1998 the pianist was suffering from Chronic fatigue syndrome, or CFS, and hearing his return to form here is a real treat. Let's resist the temptation to start waxing lyrical about the fascinating complicity between Jarrett and his rhythm section, and just say that After The Fall is a record that speaks with one voice. It's an original voice, as is the re-reading of Bud Powell that opens the concert - and swing proudly reigns at its heart. This world first is also a ray of sunshine and a burst of infectious joy. As ever, DeJohnette and Peacock merrily create jaw dropping havoc on Bouncin' With Bud... In short, it would have been a crime to leave these tapes in the archive. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Gypsy Jazz - Released September 7, 2018 | Blue Note

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Jazz - Released January 26, 2018 | Sony Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
With The Good Life, released in 2016 and for which he took a dip in the Great American Songbook, Till Brönner was at his zenith. The German trumpet player and singer penned an album of smooth classics, leaning toward love songs, which he revisited with elegance and sophistication. With Nightfall, Brönner joins forces with his old accomplice, double bass player Dieter Ilg, to revisit once again the music of great authors. Except that this time, the program couldn’t be more eclectic: from the Beatles’ Eleanor Rigby to Leonard Cohen’s A Thousand Kisses Deep, to Johann Sebastian Bach, Ornette Coleman and Jerome Kern, the duo has tackled a large repertoire. But the virtuosity shared by the two musicians allows them to make the whole project homogeneous. They most of all find a very sensual language. Each note is weighted and the silences and spaces are never forgotten. In short, this Nightfall is the incarnation of elegance. © CM/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released December 7, 2018 | Exile Productions Ltd.

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The prophet has returned! Van Morrison, he who brought us the timeless Gloria and Brown Eyed Girl, steps back in time for his new album The Prophet Speaks. The Irish bard delves into the world of jazz, blues and rhythm’n’blues with his renditions of classics from John Lee Hooker, Sam Cooke, Willie Dixon and Soloman Burke, to name but a few. Such are the talents of Van The Man that he even includes six of his own compositions (Got to Go Where The Love Is, 5am Greenwich Mean Time, Love Is Hard Work, Spirit Will Provide, Ain’t Gonna Moan No More and The Prophet Speaks) within the genre of jazz’n’blues’n’soul. “It was important for me to get back to recording new music as well as doing some of the blues material that has inspired me from the beginning” he says. Once again, the album features its fair share of musical virtuosos, including killer organist Joey DeFrancesco (who co-wrote You’re Driving Me Crazy with Morrison), guitarist Dan Wilson, drummer Michael Ode and saxophonist Troy Roberts. A classy and classical album that doesn’t look to reinvent the genre but rather to revive its original soul. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released October 21, 2014 | Verve

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With Wallflower, Diana Krall has made a journey to the wellspring of pop. For this album, coming out on Verve, the Canadian singer and pianist revisits tracks that were made famous by The Mamas & The Papas, Elton John, the Eagles, the Carpenters, Gilbert O’Sullivan, 10CC, Randy Newman, Crowded House, Bob Dylan and the Beatles. Diana Krall lends this collection charm, class and refinement which are all her own… © CM/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released June 1, 2018 | Blue Note

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There is a before and an after 1986 for Marcus Miller. That year, the bassist was 27 years old and composed and produced Miles Davis’ famous Tutu. Since then, the career of this four-string virtuoso has expanded with stunning albums for others (over 500!) and for himself (more than twenty), as well as multiple collaborations… Like often with Marcus Miller, the borders between jazz, funk, soul and blues are magnificently blurred. And it is once again the case with this Laid Black. After Afrodeezia, which he designed like a musical journey through his personal history, retracing the path of his ancestors, Laid Black falls within present time with a cocktail of all the urban sounds he loves: hip-hop, trap, soul, funk, R&B and, of course, jazz. In fact, this kind of 180° overview is the man’s trademark. Shuffling between various currents of African-American music. And even inserting a few clever references when he covers Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be) popularised by Doris Day, but using Sly Stone’s arrangement from 1973 Fresh… For this 2018 opus, Marcus Miller has called upon a few sharp shooters such as Trombone Shorty, Kirk Whalum, Take Six, Jonathan Butler and the young Belgian soul sister Selah Sue. Groove galore and precise yet never sickening pyrotechnics are at the core of an album that only its author knows how to make. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released November 9, 2018 | Okeh

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Jazz - Released June 29, 2018 | Impulse!

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz - 5 étoiles de Classica
“It’s like finding a new room in the Great Pyramid.” Saxophonist Sonny Rollins didn’t weigh his words to describe this previously unreleased session recorded by John Coltrane in March 1963 and released for the first time in June 2018. When it comes to original content, so-called gems and other rarities, labels are masters at scraping the bottom of the barrel and pumping up the cash register with anecdotal, at times completely useless content. In this case however, it’s a completely different story. Although the posthumous discography of John Coltrane, who passed away in July 1967, is already massive, this Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album is turning out to be a prime addition! The most tender of all tenderloins! The ultimate treat! The only negative would be this Lost Album appellation, as no document proves that Trane, or even his producer Bob Thiele, had in any way considered to turn this impeccable session into a proper album… The scene takes place in March 1963. Four days before the saxophonist, surrounded by his legendary Praetorian guard – pianist McCoy Tyner, drummer Elvin Jones, bass player Jimmy Garrison – recorded an essential album with singer Johnny Hartman. In the afternoon of Wednesday 6th, the quartet dropped by Rudy Van Gelder’s famous studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Just a few hours before going back to Manhattan to perform on stage at the Birdland. The tapes of this session have been retrieved by the family of Naima, Coltrane’s first wife. Fourteen tracks are playable. Fourteen, including two original songs, Untitled Original 11386 and Untitled Original 11383, on which Garrison performs a double bass solo! This marvel is available in a simple edition (seven tracks selected by John’s son, Ravi Coltrane) or Deluxe (all fourteen tracks!). The bond between the four men jumps out like rarely before. Coltrane alternates between deep sequences that foreshadow incoming wild swerves (Untitled Original 11386 and his legendary Impressions), and lyrical moments (the classic Nature Boy). Notes flood down, combining perfectly with McCoy Tyner’s percussive style… Although Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album doesn’t provide any new information on Coltrane’s quartet, it is still a completely indispensable archive, both for its musical and sound quality. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 28, 2018 | ACT Music

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Jazz in the magazine
  • Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends
    Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends Ralph Alessi's Imaginary Friends is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • A Tropical Tale
    A Tropical Tale Leyla McCalla's The Capitalist Blues is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Blurred Boundaries
    Blurred Boundaries Anne Paceo's Bright Shadows is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • To the Power of Three
    To the Power of Three Joe Lovano's Trio Tapestry is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Dandy Man
    Dandy Man Bryan Ferry is the ultimate dandy, the singer that never gets old and who does as he pleases.
  • A Night of Nat
    A Night of Nat In 2017, Gregory Porter released a tribute album - or rather a love letter, to the man he considers his ultimate hero: Nat King Cole.
  • Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars
    Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars Jools Holland, the musical virtuoso, director and well-loved host of the BBC 2 programme Later… with Jools Holland since 1992, joins forces with the first-rate vocals of Marc Almond and the musicia...
  • 360° vision
    360° vision After two staggering studio albums (When the Heart Emerges Glistening in 2011 and The Imagined Savior Is Far Easier to Paint in 2014) and one brilliant live album (A Rift in Decorum in 2017), all t...
  • Leaning back to the 60s
    Leaning back to the 60s Jose James is bringing back the great soul music of the sixties.
  • Perfect unison
    Perfect unison Fifteen years on from Changing Places, his first album for the label ECM, Tord Gustavsen is once again offering up an album performed with a trio, which seems to be the line-up most in keeping with...