Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Classical - Released February 15, 2002 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
In 1973 the recording of an opera by Wagner, which Wolfgang Sawallisch was to perform in Dresden for Electrola/EMI, was canceled. By mutual agreement, the technical team and the musicians all the same decide to honor the contract and ... to engrave the Symphonies of Schumann. This initially negative circumstance will give rise to a recording of breathtaking beauty. Intensity of phrasing, rhythmic flexibility, warmth of the orchestra, everything is masterful here! (Qobuz)« Wolfgang Sawallisch and the Staatskapelle Dresden make fitting and eloquent interpreters of Schumann's four symphonies, each a highly distinctive work. The city of Dresden was the composer's home for six years, while Sawallisch was a keen advocate of his large-scale works. For all the energy and passion that Sawallisch communicates in these performances, he does not impose himself on the music; he is content to illuminate and reinforce Schumann's inspired, if sometimes idiosyncratic arguments.» (Warner)« Outstandingly good. I count theses performances of the Schumann Symphonies as among the best things Sawallisch has ever done. The playing of the Staatskapelle Dresden is superlative in every department. Not to be missed.» (Gramophone)
From
HI-RES$13.99
CD$9.49

Classical - Released May 23, 2014 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$37.99
CD$25.49

Classical - Released April 23, 2012 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
From
CD$23.49

Classical - Released October 23, 2012 | Alpha

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
HI-RES$12.39$15.49(20%)
CD$9.59$11.99(20%)

Jazz - Released April 24, 2020 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Chamber Music - Released October 23, 2020 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
The great veterans of the Emerson String Quartet offer here Robert Schumann’s Quatuors, recorded on three dates and in two different locations. These three Quatuors are rather unique in the sense that they were composed in the same year and over an astonishingly short period of time, over June and July 1842. Perhaps this creative gesture can be seen as Schumann’s response to his admiration for Quatuors Op.44 by his friend Felix Mendelssohn, to whom this entire work was dedicated. According to French quartet specialist, Bernard Fournier, Schumann wanted to impress his soon-to-be wife, a pianist famous throughout Europe, while he was only known locally as a music critic rather than a composer. These three quartets, conceived as a whole and written in a rather bright style that is quite rare for Schumann, are rigorously interpreted by the Emersons as they make their debut with the label Pentatone. The American quartet musicians who are highly regarded for their precision, opt for an extreme liveliness that highlights the originality in these works, but to the detriment of an expression that lacks a little warmth. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles de Classica
The second album in Sir John Eliot Gardiner's Schumann series with the London Symphony Orchestra travels from glorious fanfare to dream-like passages with the lively 'Spring' and 'Rhenish' symphonies. From the dramatic first trumpet-call which awakens the frozen landscape, the First Symphony is a celebration of spring. It moves through the season and a gruff folk-song Scherzo until finally a jubilant conclusion dances into summer. Desperate, heartfelt and elegant, the "Manfred" Overture opens with an urgent impetus that only increases through the work, displaying the intense strife which lies ahead for its protagonist. Schumann’s Third is one of the composer’s most impressive, painting a euphoric picture of the German Rhineland in broad Beethovenian style and closing with an exhilarating finale. © LSO Live
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonies - Released August 21, 2020 | Myrios Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
The year 1841 finally marked Robert Schumann’s breakthrough as a composer for orchestra. That year, he created no less than two works: his First Symphony, also known as the “Spring Symphony”, and a piece which he initially planned as a “Symphonic Fantasy” in one move- ment, and which would later become his Symphony in D Minor. The Spring Symphony was composed in the coldest winter. Full of longing, it is a work that knows only one direction: growing, blossom- ing, the path to light and new life. The Symphony in D minor seems much more somber and intimate, “a work from the innermost depths of his soul”, as Clara Schumann noted in her diary. However, the audience could not warm up to this bold, impetuous work, and Schumann set it aside. Ten years later, after a major revision, he published it as his 4th Symphony. This album pairs the Spring Symphony with the original version of the Symphony in D minor, the version which friends such as Johannes Brahms preferred over the later edition. Schumann never heard it again in his lifetime, and it was not until 1889 that it was performed in public once more, by the Gürzenich Orchestra Cologne under the baton of Franz Wüllner. François-Xavier Roth, the Gürzenich Orchestra’s current chief conductor, also prefers the original version. With its leaner orchestration, it is certainly the more radical one, and thus requires a higher degree of commitment from the orchestra musicians in forming crescendi, melodic phrases, and extended arcs of formal development. © Myrios Classics
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Cello Concertos - Released November 30, 2018 | Sony Music Classical Local

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Diapason d'or / Arte - Le Choix de France Musique
Cellist Sol Gabetta and her almost-favourite pianist, Bertrand Chamayou, focus here on Schumann's all too rare repertoire for cello and piano. And once again, none of these pieces are intended a priori for cello, even though the original scores do propose the instrument as a possible alternative to the clarinet in Fantasy Pieces or the horn in Adagio and Allegro. It was only with Five Pieces in Folk Style that Schumann immediately thought of the cello! Here, Chamayou plays on a Viennese fortepiano by Streicher, dated from 1847 - three or four years after the composition of these three works. The Concerto for cello is accompanied by the Basel Chamber Orchestra, who also play on instruments from the romantic era, giving a more hushed yet incisive sound for the attacks. There’s more of an emphasis on the woodwind section as well, in contrast to the over-inflated string ensemble that so many modern orchestras offer up. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$8.99
CD$7.29

Classical - Released February 3, 2015 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$25.49
CD$21.49

Symphonies - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$13.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released September 11, 2020 | Challenge Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Robert Schumann’s piano music is invariably bound up with the dramatic events of his life. Schumann channelled both his love for Clara and his pianistic frustrations into his music, which was often composed with Clara in mind, both romantically and musically; she was an outstanding pianist and composer in her own right. During the late 1830s Schumann wrote numerous works for the piano, many of which met with considerable success. The Arabeske in C Major, Op. 18 dates from early 1839. In a letter of 15 August Schumann described the piece, which was dedicated to Frau Majorin Friederike Serre auf Maxen, as “delicate – for ladies”, and it is true that it has a gently lyrical, dreamy quality. Yet there is more to the Arabeske than this modest description would suggest. Schumann had left Leipzig for Vienna in the autumn of 1838 after reaching an impasse in his relations with the Wiecks, and the keenness with which he felt the separation from Clara may be sensed in the Arabeske’s mixture of wistfulness and determination. Of the piano music written by Schumann in the 1830s, just two collections include movement titles: the Phantasiestücke, Op. 12, and the Kinderszenen, Op. 15 of 1838. Schumann sketched 30 “cute little things” in early 1838, from which he chose 13 to create the Kinderszenen. The vivid movement titles were attached to each of the Kinderszenen after the music had been written, rather than inspiring the musical content. Yet the tender romanticism of these pieces – in Träumerei especially – suggests that Clara was never far from Schumann’s thoughts as he composed them. Although Clara was a powerful source of inspiration for Robert, he was also profoundly influenced by both musical and literary sources, which helped him to make sense of his rich inner world. E.T.A. Hoffmann enabled Schumann to explore the different facets of his nature through the character of Johannes Kreisler, who appeared in several volumes including Hoffmann’s Fantasiestücke, one section of which is entitled ‘Kreisleriana’. Schumann strongly identified with Kapellmeister Kreisler: both men were devoted to the music of J.S. Bach, and both veered between extremities of mood, from ecstasy to despair. This multifaceted nature is encapsulated in the eight movements of Kreisleriana, Op. 16. Kreisler’s brusque mood-swings are represented through Schumann’s contrasts between dazzling virtuosity and lyrical tenderness, often anchored by the tonal contrast between the key areas of G minor and B-flat major. Schumann’s dual nature, previously communicated through Florestan and Eusebius, had found a new mouthpiece. In contrast with the first decade of his career, which was almost entirely given over to piano music, Schumann did not write a great deal of solo piano music in the 1840s, producing just a handful of fugues and pieces for children. At the end of 1848 he began the Waldszenen (‘Forest Scenes’), a set of nine short piano pieces. Vogel als Prophet is one of the more disturbing pieces in the set. Schumann had returned from Vienna to Leipzig in April 1839. He drafted his Drei Romanzen, Op. 28, by 11 December. Clara was so enamoured of the set that she insisted on being their dedicatee: “As your bride you absolutely have to dedicate something more to me; and I know of nothing more tender than these three Romances, especially the middle one, which is the most beautiful love duet”. © CAVI-Music
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Classical - Released September 20, 2019 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
On its face, this 2019 release by John Eliot Gardiner and the London Symphony Orchestra seems fairly straightforward and standard, with an overture at the opening and two symphonies by the great Romantic composer Robert Schumann occupying the rest of the program. Yet listeners may consider that it is far from routine on further investigation. The overture to Genoveva is the only part of Schumann's 1850 opera that is regularly performed nowadays, though it remains relatively obscure when compared to other overtures that serve to open concerts. Heard more frequently, the Symphony No. 2 in C major has had a fairly stable performance history, though like Schumann's other symphonies, it hasn't achieved the status of greatness accorded to the symphonies of Beethoven or Brahms, and remains in the second tier of 19th century symphonies. The Symphony No. 4 in D minor, however, may startle listeners who were expecting the long-established version of 1851. Instead, Gardiner has chosen the original 1841 version, which Clara Schumann described as unfinished sketches, but which Brahms favored over the revised version and revealed it to be complete when he published it in 1891. Chronologically, this was actually Schumann's second symphony, though it was first published after the two intervening symphonies and became the Fourth by default. Schumann's leaner orchestration has not been smoothed over or thickened with the later excessive doublings of woodwinds and strings, and while the form is almost identical to the later version, experienced listeners should note the many differences which are evident in this reading. The live recording by LSO Live captures the orchestra's sound with great clarity and fine details, which certainly makes Schumann's richly scored music easier to follow with pleasure. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$10.99

Classical - Released April 1, 2016 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$22.99
CD$16.49

Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | eaSonus

Hi-Res Booklet
A pianist and performer of the same calibre as Gilels or Richter, the great Elisabeth Leonskaja still struggles to be recognised for her true worth. Do we need to mention the Russian school of piano in connection to her work? It seems that we do, as she jokes that she has “her own republic”, balancing her Russian training and her adopted city of Vienna where she has lived for over forty years.This beautiful studio album is entirely devoted to Robert Schumann, recorded in Bremen (Germany) in 2018 and 2019. Her sound immediately captivates you, the sound emanating from her piano, smooth and buttery, adorned with nostalgic touches and autumnal colours. We find Schumann's works here, at the height of her artistic career.The Etudes symphoniques seem to dream of a world accessible only by the force of thought, the Variations Abegg already captures the essence of Schumann’s hopes and anxieties, the brilliant and colourful Papillons dancing in the sky, the two Sonates Op. 11 and Op. 22 contain a romanticism that is more tender and humane than dishevelled, this splendid double album also contains the Posthumous Variations and the rarer Geistervariationen (“Variations of the Spirits”) dedicated to Clara, Schumann’s last work, composed some ten days before he attempted suicide by throwing himself into the Rhine. Drenched in melancholy, the pieces play on reminiscence and sound like Schumann’s final farewell to music before he ended his life miserably in a mental asylum, two years later. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$10.99

Art Songs, Mélodies & Lieder - Released September 11, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Nearly every setting of the poems by Kerner, Chamisso, Andersen and Heine heard in this recital dates from 1840, the year Schumann found himself totally engrossed with the song genre, producing no fewer than 138 individual lieder. This creative vein seems to mirror the inner torments that gripped the young composer at the time, while revealing the extraordinary range of his musical invention and unequalled talent of storyteller, as Samuel Hasselhorn demonstrates here, after winning first prize at the 2018 Queen Elisabeth Competition: the young German baritone’s first recording for harmonia mundi is a veritable love letter to this most intimate of art forms. © harmonia mundi
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released September 24, 2013 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$10.99

Concertos - Released March 22, 2015 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica