Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$8.99
CD$7.29

Classical - Released June 27, 2008 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Coming as it does after disappointingly turgid readings of Brahms' four symphonies with the London Philharmonic, Marin Alsop's powerful recording of Dvorák's Ninth with the Baltimore Symphony is a surprise. Recorded live in Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore, Alsop's Ninth is robust and energetic, with muscular rhythms and stalwart tempos. Her Molto vivace Scherzo has real heft and weight and her closing Allegro con fuoco has drive and strength. Better yet, Alsop coaxes warm, characterful playing from the Baltimore musicians. The ensemble is tight and direct in the fast movements, but the playing is colorful and soulful in the slow movements. The burnished lower strings in the opening Adagio and the solemn trombones at the start of the central Largo are deeply felt and quietly affecting. Preceded by a brilliant and bumptious account of the same composer's Symphonic Variations, this disc will add luster to both Alsop and the Baltimore's reputation. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$82.99
CD$76.99

Classical - Released July 7, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Even though Antonín Dvorák remains among the most popular of Romantic composers, compilations of his complete symphonies are somewhat scarce, especially when compared to those of other great symphonists of the 19th century. That's one reason why Jirí Belohlávek's 2014 set with the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra should get classical fans' attention, but a more valid reason to acquire this collection is the exceptionally high quality of the performances, which Decca recorded in a series of subscription concerts between 2010 and 2014. A deciding factor should be the strong feeling this conductor and orchestra have for Dvorák's music, not only because of a shared Bohemian tradition and the composer's legacy (Dvorák conducted the Czech Philharmonic's first concert in 1896), but also because few other orchestras communicate the rhythms and colors of the music as vibrantly and with as much excitement. As rare as sets of the complete symphonic cycle are, those that include Dvorák's concertos are rarer still. The recordings Belohlávek and the CPO made of the Cello Concerto in B minor with Alisa Weilerstein, the Violin Concerto in A minor with Frank Peter Zimmerman, and the Piano Concerto in G minor with Garrick Ohlsson are essential listening, and their inclusion with the symphonies gives the package much greater value. Decca's high-definition sound delivers clean details and close-up presence, so even though these recordings are live, they sound as fine as a studio recording. Highly recommended. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released October 5, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
From
HI-RES$11.99
CD$10.49

Classical - Released March 24, 2014 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released March 3, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
"This time, I am not only an absolute musician, but also a poet", wrote Dvorak regarding the Poetic Tone Pictures, Op. 85, his most extended cycle of lyric character pieces for piano. Concluded in April/May 1889 at his summer residence in Vysoka, the Poetic Tone Pictures introduced a new tendency in Dvorak's output: from then on, he started to "poeticize" his musical style. As he wrote to his publisher Fritz Simrock: "Each piece will have its own title and is meant to express something: thus, as it were, this is program music!" This new tendency culminated in 1896-1898 with the five symphonic poems The Water Goblin Op. 107, The Noon Witch Op. 108, The Golden Spinning Wheel Op. 109, The Wild Dove Op. 110, and A Hero's Song Op. 111. The great Czech composer is hardly known for his piano works, in which he invariably seems to stand somewhat in the shadow of great Romantic masters such as Schumann or Brahms. Nonetheless, the 13 character pieces that comprise the Poetic Tone Pictures reveal an incredibly rich, enchantingly diverse world of inner images. At the same time, they offer a multitude of stylistic and pianistic surprises by combining folklore elements with subtle timbre effects. It is therefore all the more astonishing that they have been seldom performed in concert. Elena Bashkirova was looking for a new work to play: she rediscovered the neglected cycle in her score cabinet, and was immediately thrilled with Dvorak's rich and diverse palette of timbres: "I flipped through the pages, played a couple of chords, and the music captured me right away. It's so poetic, so evocative. I immediately started to see stories and pictures in my mind's eye. As a pianist, you can narrate these stories very well. They open up our hearts". Elena Bashkirova finds that the Poetic Tone Pictures, although composed in the countryside, have everything to do in terms of mood with Prague Art Deco style. She is reminded "of those marvellous fin-de-siècle windows with their beautiful female figures". And she points out that Dvorak was thinking more of human situations than of landscapes when he wrote these pieces". This is the first solo album on CAvi-music by Elena Bashkirova: the daughter of the Russian Pianist Dmitri Bashkirov and spouse of Daniel Barenboim. © CAvi-Music
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released June 4, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Only a chosen few can captivate listeners with a work that has been brought out over and over again hundreds of times. But that is what is achieved here with a Symphony "From the New World" byAntonin Dvořák which doesn't seem to have aged a bit. Recorded in 1959 in Berlin in excellent stereo, this feverish performance also shows the miracle that an invited leader can create. In a few short recording sessions, Ferenc Fricsay was able to bring forth from the Berlin Philharmonic a sound that was the polar opposite to Karajan's softness. Everything here, with the exception of an irresistibly dreamy Largo is sharp as a knife and whip-smart, in the the style of the Czech Philharmonic. It is the magic of an orchestra that can instantly adapt itself to the personality of a leader who knows how to convince. Recorded in 1960, but with Fricsay's Berlin RIAS (Radio in the American Sector) Orchestra, the symphonic poem by Franz Liszt, Les Préludes, is cut across by an epic gale, reinforced by a slow and majestic tempo. As for The Moldau (Vlatva) by Bedřich Smetana, so close to Czech hearts, Fricsay recorded it several times, most notably in 1960, with the Südfunk Orchester, the film of a rehearsal of which is one of the few visual records of the great Hungarian conductor. It was over the course of that same year that he made this recording, at the head of the Berlin Philharmonic. In 1948, Ferenc Fricsay had signed an exclusive contract with Deutsche Grammophon, becoming one of the few artists never to record for another label. On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of the conductor's birth in 2014, the yellow label published an impressive box set (available on Qobuz) which brings together all of his recordings. It is a treasure trove for music lovers, because among the records which remain famous to this day, we find a whole series of forgotten works. The recordings were mainly de in the Titania-Palast in Steglitz in Berlin, which was the only concert hall which was spared the Allies’ bombs. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released November 4, 2014 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 12, 2017 | New York Philharmonic

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Classical - Released March 15, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Classical - Released August 28, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
To say that Kian Soltani's concerto debut for Deutsche Grammophon packs a punch is something of an understatement, and indeed long before Soltani even enters the fray, given that I'm not sure I've ever heard an orchestra sounding quite so dangerously, growlingly foreboding and theatrical at the opening of Dvořák's Cello Concerto as is heard here from Daniel Barenboim and the Staatskapelle Berlin in what was a live performance at the Berlin Philharmonie: markedly slower than the score's metronome marking of 116 to a crotchet; little shivering swells added to the pianissimo crotchets concluding the first phrase; then not just a crescendo up to the first fortissimo statement of the main theme, but also a rushing accelerando; while this revving of the accelerator ultimately lands us smartly at Dvořák's actual tempo marking, the effect is one of being caught up in a lethally super-speed, supremely polished whirlwind. If you're a stickler for keeping to the score then you might balk, but there's no question that it's electrifying stuff. And on that note, remember Karajan's glorious bar 72 injection of an ardent and thoroughly unscripted portamento swoop for DG, back in 1968 with Rostropovich? Well Barenboim's repeated that trick here, and every bit as gloriously. Soltani himself is no less grabbing when he finally makes his entrance, displaying all the golden beauty of tone and poeticism we heard on Home, his recital debut for the label. Indeed the whole concerto represents a compelling combination of distinctive personalities, Soltani's romance coming elegant and precise, softly polished and lyrically singing, against Barenboim's coming ardently soaring one moment and craggily thunderous the next (and on that note, I've equally never heard the second movement's sudden minor-keyed outburst - just before Dvořák quotes his sister-in-law and first love Josefina's favourite song of his, referencing the fact that tragically she was dying as the concerto was being penned - explode in with such force as here). More Soltani-shaped pleasures come via the piercing urgency and biting rhythm he brings to the forceful, dance-like finale, a highlight of which is his lovingly exuberant and tightly together gypsy duet with the first violin; and back in the first movement, his sensitive duetting with the woodwind, who themselves are lovingly picked out by the engineering. In fact the overall engineering is another draw, the Philharmonie sounding wonderfully full and warm. Less enjoyable for some, meanwhile, will be the various rubatos and slackenings of the tempo applied to the softer passages, which can feel as though the breaks are being overly pulled. Soltani sticks with Dvořák for the remainder of the album, teaming up with the Staatskapelle cellists for various shorter pieces: his own transcriptions of the Op. 55 Gypsy Melodies from Songs My Mother Taught Me and the Allegro moderato from Four Romantic Pieces Op. 75, alongside transcriptions of Silent Woods plus the Largo from the ”New World Symphony”. These are all elegantly done, with superb blending and chamber awareness, and once again play to all Soltani's lyrical strengths. They're also all of a similar “smooth classics” mood, which ultimately makes for a less compelling listen than the album's first half, but which no doubt smartly ticks the playlist-friendly box. And while the manner in which the playlist box has been ticked has managed to sell no-one's soul along the way, after such a distinctive and persuasive Dvořák Cello Concerto, I'm hoping that Soltani's next concerto offering can be a meaty double bill. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released April 21, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
Following her successful debut on Decca with the cello concertos of Edward Elgar and Elliott Carter, Alisa Weilerstein serves up another touchstone of her repertoire, Dvorák's Cello Concerto in B minor. Even though this album offers a handful of pieces for cello and piano, which Weilerstein and pianist Anna Polonsky play with charm and sentiment, listeners will pay the most attention to the concerto, which is the program's raison d'être. Weilerstein's highly personal and intensely Romantic style of playing is well-suited to this concerto, which is big on emotion and poignant lyricism, and her long lines and rapt expression effectively carry the piece. The accompaniment by Jirí Belohlávek and the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra is vibrant and full of color and presence, though at no point is Weilerstein overwhelmed by the ensemble, thanks to the central microphone placement that is closely directed at the cello. Of course, such tight recording tends to expose the roughness of her multiple stops, and her entrance in the first movement is a bit startling. All the same, her rich timbres and passionate singing tone more than make up for any scratchiness one may encounter. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$69.99
CD$63.99

Symphonies - Released November 1, 2016 | Decca

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte - Choc de Classica
From
HI-RES$7.99
CD$5.99

Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 2000 | LSO Live

Hi-Res
From
CD$6.99

Chamber Music - Released September 24, 2010 | Supraphon a.s.

Second in popularity only to the Ninth Symphony "From the New World," Dvorák's Twelfth String Quartet -- which was dubbed the "American" Quartet by the public and media rather than the composer himself -- is a work nearly synonymous with the composer's tenure in the United States. These were not the only two works inspired by his cross-sea voyage, however. The Thirteenth String Quartet in G major, Op. 106, though not imbued with the same folkloric characteristics, also came about following the composer's return from the States. The popularity of the "American" Quartet has resulted in a work that is arguably overplayed, making it difficult for new ensembles to find anything new or unique to say about it. Such is the case with this Supraphon album of the Pavel Haas Quartet. Its playing in the F major quartet is solid, yes. It is technically polished and musically informed. But there is little to be found here that has not been said a dozen times before. Where the Pavel Haas Quartet really shines is in the less-frequently performed G major quartet. Here, the group really pulls out all the stops. Listen to the lush sonorities achieved in the Adagio, the hammering rhythmic ostinato and aggressive fugato in the third movement, or the fiery conclusion to the finale. The PHQ rides the line between overly aggressive playing and unbridled excitement without crossing it, resulting in a wholly thrilling performance that leaves listeners wishing they had left off the "American" Quartet in favor of another of the many neglected but equally deserving Dvorák quartets. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$13.49
CD$8.99

Classical - Released March 12, 2013 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Month - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Veteran historical-performance conductor Philippe Herreweghe and his Collegium Vocale Gent might seem a questionable choice for Antonín Dvorák's lushly Romantic Stabat Mater. And the booklet essay, which assigns the motivation for the work to Dvorák's 1870s employment at a church that favored pure Palestrina choral style, may further lead you to expect (or fear) a radically stripped-down reading of the work. But actually Herreweghe, like other performers who came of age in the historical-performance movement, has been moving into mainstream repertory, and his interpretation here, while not exactly possessing an intense subjectivity, is well within the mainstream. It's a bit deliberate in the tempos and tends to emphasize the work's roots in church music, but it is in no way chilly, and there's an X factor that comes from the performers' clear enthusiasm for the music. Herreweghe employs a choir of about 60 singers, a far cry from the 840 that performed the work in London, and more monumental performances exist. But it would no doubt have been very often performed by forces of this size, and everything is in balance and very smoothly done. Best of all are the quartet of Flemish and German soloists, whose ensemble work is both precise and relaxed, and who add a sort of lilt to many of their melodies. Listen to the work of mezzo soprano Michaela Selinger in the "Inflammatus et accensus movement" (track 9): she is highly expressive without letting the music expand to operatic dimensions. Herreweghe's characteristic orientation comes through in the final fugue, where the parts are all clearly sculpted and plenty of room is made for the brass underpinning. Add in clear, warm sound from Out Here's engineers, working in the Antwerp deSingel concert hall, and you have a worthy entry in the still not large catalog of recordings of the Stabat Mater. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$8.99
CD$7.29

Classical - Released May 25, 2010 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
There were critics and listeners who enjoyed and admired the recording of Dvorák's Ninth Symphony with Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, but this recording of the composer's Seventh and Eighth symphonies is hugely disappointing. The Seventh has no power and tragedy, with flaccid attacks, slack ensemble playing, lax phrasing, and smudged details. There is no joy or energy in the Eighth, but thick textures, heavy balance, dull colors, and lackadaisical rhythms. It's not that Alsop doesn't know how to get from one point to another, it's that she makes getting there seem so tedious. And it's not that the Baltimore Symphony doesn't know how to play these standard repertoire pieces, but that they seem to have little to no enthusiasm for doing them again. Captured in gray, two-dimensional digital sound, this disc reflects badly on everyone associated with it. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$35.99
CD$25.79

Trios - Released January 27, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
From
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released October 20, 2017 | Supraphon a.s.

Distinctions Gramophone Award - Choc de Classica
As with Shostakovich and the Russians, there's debate over whether Czech performers bring a special quality to Dvorák's music. The Pavel Haas Quartet certainly makes Dvorák sound more Eastern than usual, bringing dramatic contrasts of light and shade in the Piano Quintet in A major, Op. 81, in place of the usual orderly Brahmsian procession of themes. From the start, the playing of the group is both melodically evocative and intense, with tempos on the fast side. The contribution of hot Russian pianist Boris Giltburg here is substantial; in the slow movement of the Piano Quintet he establishes the little opening F sharp minor arpeggio as a kind of nervous memory rather than simply as an ornament. Sample the grand sweep of the finale for an idea of what you're getting here. The String Quintet in E flat major, Op. 97, is contrapuntally a more dense work than the Piano Quintet, and the Pavel Haas Quartet, joined by original violist Pavel Niki, differs less dramatically from other readings of the work. Yet this work also connects emotionally. Supraphon, not known for top-flight engineering, scores here with the sound environment of the Rudolfinium in Prague, giving space to the Haas Quartet's big interpretations. This recording offers a new standard for these much-played works. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$13.49
CD$8.99

Chamber Music - Released April 30, 2021 | Melism

Hi-Res Booklet
If there's one corner of the classical repertoire we hear very little of either onstage or from the recording studio, it's the substantial body of music written during the 19th century for piano four-hands. Logistically impractical for most top-level touring soloists due to the level of diary synchronisation it requires, while also exceeding the technical capabilities of today's average amateur (its original enthusiastic target market), this is music that's fallen silent not through lack of quality, but because in performance terms it's fallen between every conceivable pillar and post. Zero in on Dvořák, and that's certainly been the case both for his ten-strong Legends, Op. 59 set, and his From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68 cycle of six character pieces; and while Legends has had a bit more airtime over the years thanks to his later orchestration of them, those orchestrations were never quite achieved the popularity of his Slavonic Dances which equally began life in piano four-hands. Consequently, to record this music at all ticks the box of bringing something new to the catalogue, but Christophe Sirodeau and Anna Zassimov's programming then goes a step further by also merging the two sets, appending each From the Bohemian Forest piece with two complimentary Legends. So from the delicately merry, folky swirling energy and forwards flow of In the Spinning Room we move to No. 2 of Legends in G major, opening in almost almost hymn-like quiet dignity and stillness; followed in turn by the more rustic dance feel of No. 3 in G minor. Constant hallmarks of these interpretations are the silvery, mellifluous grace and lilt both pianists bring to even the most dancingly energetic and note-y passages, the organicism of mid-piece transitions between moods and metres (take the switches in Legends No. 4 between maestoso chordal statements and delicately rippling passages), the easy forwards flow, and the smooth blending between the parts. Add warm, bright and clear capturing, and there's much to enjoy here. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz