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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released December 2, 2016 | Alia Vox

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Alpha

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique - Recommandé par Répertoire

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released July 2, 2021 | deutsche harmonia mundi

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Making the most of the vocal and stylistic near-perfection of his Huelgas Ensemble, Paul van Nevel explores English polyphony between 1300 and 1400. The authors of this late medieval music are unknown, as these pieces have come down to us anonymously, unlike many works on the continent, whose composers are known and often highly revered. But in spite of the anonymity, this material which was written around the time of the Hundred Years' War had a great influence on the music of those distant times. The dozen sacred and secular a capella pieces presented here come from various sources preserved in the United States (New York), England (London, Oxford, Durham) and France (Tours, Chantilly). With their strange chromaticism and extreme, complicated modulations, the composers of Albion paved the way for a new musical style. This new album consists of mostly unknown and unrecorded pieces that add to the knowledge of an era that is still largely undiscovered. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Celtic - Released March 5, 2012 | Alpha

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released May 29, 2013 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Arcana

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Could you ever imagine that one of the most popular saints in the Christian calendar of the Middle Ages was - Buddha? After ten years of research in a multitude of libraries worldwide, Katarina Livljanić and the ensemble Dialogos, faithfull to their exploratory and fearless spirit, bring yet another surprise from the less known medieval lands, after its award-winning albums such as Dalmatica: Chants of the Adriatic, Lombards & Barbares, La vision de Tondal, Judith: A Biblical Story from Renaissance Croatia. It is the incredible story of saints Barlaam and Josaphat, a christianized version of Buddha's life, which crossed over at least four religions and was transmitted through almost all the medieval languages. Powerful songs — incarnated by voice and instruments, sing the legend about the king's son, prince Josaphat, who leaves the noisy world of opulence to search for inner peace — songs which follow the path of his story from one medieval language to another, from Greek, Latin to Old Croatian, Italian, Church Slavonic… © Alpha Classics
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Africa - Released January 1, 1977 | Mali - Syllart Records

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Choirs (sacred) - Released June 18, 2021 | harmonia mundi

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This recording came to fruition thanks to nearly 25 years’ worth of efforts. In 1997, Marcel Pérès and his Ensemble Organum began a simultaneous exploration of the Mozarabic rite (the liturgical chant peculiar to the Christians living in Spain at the time of Arab rule) and of the Samaa spiritual practice of Morocco. Setting aside the theological differences between the two faiths, the artists discovered a great deal of kinship between the two forms of musical expression. A veritable utopia, the idea for this recording then suggested itself: through music, to regain the lost accord of human brotherhood. © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

A strictly traditional flamenco record, Pepe Romero's 1987 recording Flamenco! features not only his own sterling guitar work, but also singer Chano Lobato's expressive vocals and, in an inspired touch that not enough flamenco artists have thought of, two genuine flamenco dancers, Maria Magdalena and Paco Romero. Flamenco, after all, is dance music, and as in some forms of English contra dancing, Appalachian clog dancing, and other forms of folk music, the percussive sound of the dancers' shoes (and the female dancer's traditional castanets) is intended as part of the music. As a result, Flamenco! has a vitality and excitement often missing from classical flamenco records, which can sometimes come off as a bit stuffy and overly serious. Lobato's voice, a dusky alto with a beautifully controlled vibrato, suits the material perfectly, capturing the florid theatricality of flamenco music without going over the top. There are undoubtedly better flamenco records than this, but there are few that are as much fun. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Ricercar

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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | harmonia mundi

The music recorded here is taken from a twelfth century manuscript that originated in the basilica of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, based on the liturgical practices of the Knights Templar, a non-monastic order founded to protect Jerusalem and the Christians who made pilgrimage there. The CD avoids the monotony that can sometimes afflict recordings of Very Early Music. The variety of styles -- monophonic chant, melodies sung over a drone, parallel organum (in which several voices sing the same melody at the interval of the fifth or octave), and three-part polyphony -- maintains a high level of interest. The musical material strays frequently from the strict modal practices that characterized music more closely connected with Roman liturgical traditions and is sometimes astonishingly chromatic and dissonant. The free use and style of ornamentation demonstrate the influences of the musical culture of the Middle East. Several of the pieces have a stronger feeling of a regular pulse than much chant, reflecting the physical, almost dance-like motions that conductor Marcel Pérès describes as being an integral part of the original performance of this repertoire. The music and the performances are genuinely gripping and should be revelatory for anyone whose only experience with music from this period has been pallid performances of unison plainchant. Ensemble Organum sings this repertoire with conviction and simplicity. The voices are obviously well trained and the intonation and ensemble are excellent, but the vocal quality is unmannered and direct, ideally suited to the self-effacing aesthetic appropriate for music not intended for performance, but as an act of worship within a close-knit community. The recording was made in the wonderfully resonant 900-year-old Abbey of Fontevraud and effectively conveys the vastness of the acoustical space without sacrificing clarity. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 14, 2008 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released May 24, 2019 | Ambronay Éditions

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Classical - Released April 23, 2021 | Supraphon a.s.

Booklet
When, in 1872, the student Leopold Katz discovered in the attic of the presbytery in the South Bohemian village of Jistebnice an old manuscript of Czech songs, he might not have realised just how enormous its value was. Today, the hymnal, bearing the title "Jistebnický kancionál", is primarily known for containing the Hussite choral anthem Ye Who Are Warriors of God. (The melody has attained worldwide fame due to its inclusion in Smetana's symphonic poems Tábor and Blaník, parts of the cycle My Country.) Yet the most notable aspect of the hand-written hymnbook is that it features songs in Czech for mass and prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours. It would seem that the bold project's aim was to make liturgy accessible to the wide religious community in their own language. The creators evidently above all strove to translate Latin hymns into Czech, but they also wrote tunes of their own. Of a particularly high value is the record of the Easter liturgy that, owing to its detailed instructions, affords us a view of the Hussite form of worship. A number of unanswered questions and mysteries still surround the Jistebnice manuscript. The present album, made by the internationally esteemed vocal Tiburtina Ensemble, lifts the veil of mystery to a certain degree, with the bright female voices conveying the sheer beauty of the songs. "How wonderful my favourite Latin choral pieces sounded in Old Czech!" Barbora Kabátková says. "I consider the Jistebnice hymnal to be a great discovery, and hope that the listeners will perceive it in the same manner". © Supraphon
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Classical - Released April 14, 2008 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released June 19, 2009 | Arcana

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Alpha

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique - 10 de Répertoire - Recommandé par Classica
Alpha Productions' Nobody's Jig: Mr. Playford's English Dancing Master appears to be the debut outing on disc by a French period instrument ensemble under the great name of Les Witches. This collection is made up of late seventeenth and early eighteenth century dances initially published in John Playford's English Dancing Master and related sources. Nobody's Jig: Mr. Playford's English Dancing Master is a nicely chosen program, and certainly makes for pleasant listening, as Les Witches realizes and harmonizes these mostly monophonic dances with a "Broken Consort" of violin, flute, lute/guitar, viola da gamba, and clavichord/cistern, or some smaller combination derived thereof. The 32-page booklet is handsomely decorated with sometimes-oblique black and white images of the group in combination with more photo essay-styled pictures. Unfortunately, overall the music has no muscle and doesn't really inspire one to dance. The manner in which Les Witches handle pieces such as Woodycock tend to be laid-back, somber, folksy, and rather similar to the way that they play several other pieces on this disc. Some of the music is good; for example, their rendering of Drive the cold winter away/The Beggar Boy maintains at least some sense of forward momentum. Nevertheless, an awful lot of the music is centered on the flute, and after a while it gets monotonous -- percussion instruments are utilized only sparingly. There is an obvious counterpoint between the approach of Les Witches and that of the Baltimore Consort; and if one likes Baroque dances performed in a manner that would play well on "A Prairie Home Companion," then by all means, this is for you. While it is certainly unusual to find a European period instrument group that sounds like a North American one, it looks like Les Witches will need to move forward from Nobody's Jig: Mr. Playford's English Dancing Master in order to deliver an album that is worthy of their name. © TiVo