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The Blues Magoos - The Blues Magoos: Mercury Singles (1966-1968)

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The Blues Magoos: Mercury Singles (1966-1968)

The Blues Magoos

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History remembers the Blues Magoos as one-hit wonders from the garage rock era who faded out not long after "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet" dropped off the charts in early 1967. However, like most groups who hit the Top Ten in the '60s, the Blues Magoos tried hard to land another chart single, and it was arguably bad luck rather than a lack of skill that kept them out of the Top 40. The Mercury Singles 1966-1968 features the A- and B-sides of the eight 45s Mercury Records released during the Magoos' tenure with the label. While the band's first two albums, Psychedelic Lollipop (1966) and Electric Comic Book (1967), are better than average '60s garage efforts, The Mercury Singles is a more satisfying listening experience than either of them. That's not to say it doesn't have filler -- the whacked-out noise collage "Dante's Inferno" demonstrates why some bands shouldn't smoke reefer in the studio, and the holiday single "Jingle Bells" b/w "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" sounds like an afterthought tossed off in an afternoon. But most of the tracks find the Magoos playing at the top of their game; the opener, "Tobacco Road," is a high-powered run through every trick in the group's repertoire, "One by One" is a superb bit of jangle pop, "There She Goes" is an admirably chaotic blues-psych freakout, and their cover of the Move's "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" is great fun. The Blues Magoos were more than capable in the studio, delivering tight and energetic performances throughout this collection, and the remastering of these mono mixes gives them the solid punch they deserve. The 1992 collection Kaleidescopic Compendium: The Best of the Blues Magoos is still the best one-disc celebration of this underrated band, but The Mercury Singles 1966-1968 shows the Blues Magoos mastered the greatest rock & roll medium of their day, the 45-rpm single, and it sums up their salad days in a concise 45 minutes.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

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The Blues Magoos: Mercury Singles (1966-1968)

The Blues Magoos

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1
Tobacco Road
00:04:40

John D. Loudermilk, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1966 UMG Recordings, Inc.

2
Sometimes I Think About
00:03:39

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer - Thielheim, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1966 UMG Recordings, Inc.

3
(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet
00:02:17

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Theilhelm, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1966 Island Records, a division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

4
Gotta Get Away
00:02:30

Frank R. Adams, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Annehley Gordon, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1966 UMG Recordings, Inc.

5
Pipe Dream
00:02:27

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 UMG Recordings, Inc.

6
There's A Chance We Can Make It
00:02:15

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 UMG Recordings, Inc.

7
One By One
00:02:48

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1966 UMG Recordings, Inc.

8
Dante's Inferno
00:03:30

Ronnie Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Theilhelm, ComposerLyricist - Daking, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 UMG Recordings, Inc.

9
I Wanna Be There
00:03:00

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1968 UMG Recordings, Inc.

10
Summer Is The Man
00:03:02

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 UMG Recordings, Inc.

11
There She Goes
00:02:50

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1968 UMG Recordings, Inc.

12
Life Is Just A Cher O'Bowlies
00:02:38

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 Island Records, a division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

13
Jingle Bells
00:02:37

J.S. Pierpont, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 UMG Recordings, Inc.

14
Santa Claus Is Coming To Town
00:01:27

J. Fred Coots, ComposerLyricist - Haven Gillespie, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 Mercury Records

15
I Can Hear The Grass Grow
00:02:20

Roy Wood, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1968 UMG Recordings, Inc.

16
Yellow Rose
00:02:29

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1968 UMG Recordings, Inc.

Album Description

History remembers the Blues Magoos as one-hit wonders from the garage rock era who faded out not long after "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet" dropped off the charts in early 1967. However, like most groups who hit the Top Ten in the '60s, the Blues Magoos tried hard to land another chart single, and it was arguably bad luck rather than a lack of skill that kept them out of the Top 40. The Mercury Singles 1966-1968 features the A- and B-sides of the eight 45s Mercury Records released during the Magoos' tenure with the label. While the band's first two albums, Psychedelic Lollipop (1966) and Electric Comic Book (1967), are better than average '60s garage efforts, The Mercury Singles is a more satisfying listening experience than either of them. That's not to say it doesn't have filler -- the whacked-out noise collage "Dante's Inferno" demonstrates why some bands shouldn't smoke reefer in the studio, and the holiday single "Jingle Bells" b/w "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" sounds like an afterthought tossed off in an afternoon. But most of the tracks find the Magoos playing at the top of their game; the opener, "Tobacco Road," is a high-powered run through every trick in the group's repertoire, "One by One" is a superb bit of jangle pop, "There She Goes" is an admirably chaotic blues-psych freakout, and their cover of the Move's "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" is great fun. The Blues Magoos were more than capable in the studio, delivering tight and energetic performances throughout this collection, and the remastering of these mono mixes gives them the solid punch they deserve. The 1992 collection Kaleidescopic Compendium: The Best of the Blues Magoos is still the best one-disc celebration of this underrated band, but The Mercury Singles 1966-1968 shows the Blues Magoos mastered the greatest rock & roll medium of their day, the 45-rpm single, and it sums up their salad days in a concise 45 minutes.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

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