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The Blues Magoos - Electric Comic Book

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Electric Comic Book

The Blues Magoos

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The Blues Magoos' first album, Psychedelic Lollipop, earned the band a major hit single, "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet," and in the grand tradition of striking while the iron was hot, the New York-based quintet were back with their second LP, 1967's Electric Comic Book, less than five months later. The sophomore effort is a noticeably more ambitious piece of work than the Magoos' debut, and while psychedelia was a catchphrase more than anything else on the first record, Electric Comic Book sounds trippier and a bit more expansive by comparison (the goofy "Intermission" tosses in some fairly obvious marijuana and cocaine references which would have been almost unthinkable in 1966, and the drug angle in "Pipe Dream" isn't exactly subtle). In addition, a few months of playing live had tightened up a combo who already sounded pretty good together, as well as bolstering the confidence in Ralph Scala's vocals and keyboard work and the fuzzy interplay of guitarists Mike Esposito and Emil "Peppy" Thielhelm. However, the blues and R&B elements that were a large part of Psychedelic Lollipop's strength have faded into the background here (except for a overdone cover of Jimmy Reed's "Let's Get Together"), and though the band could come up with a respectable pop tune, "Baby, I Want You" and "Take My Love" sound like throw-aways that were tossed together quickly to fill out a record not quite 30 minutes long (though "Take My Love" does have the very memorable line "Take my love and shove it up your heart"). Psychedelic Lollipop is well short of a classic, but overall it's a stronger and more coherent set of songs than Electric Comic Book, which sounds like the quickly recorded follow-up that it truly was, though it does have moments that suggest the band could have made another album as good as the debut with a bit more time and attention.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

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Electric Comic Book

The Blues Magoos

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1
Pipe Dream
00:02:25

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

2
There's A Chance We Can Make It
00:02:13

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

3
Life Is Just A Cher O'Bowlies
00:02:34

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

4
Gloria
00:06:01

VAN MORRISON, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

5
Intermission
00:01:06

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

6
Albert Common Is Dead
00:01:48

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

7
Summer Is The Man
00:02:58

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

8
Baby, I Want You
00:02:42

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

9
Let's Get Together
00:03:05

Reed, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

10
Take My Love
00:01:50

Scala, ComposerLyricist - L. Wolfe Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

11
Rush Hour
00:02:34

The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Michael Esposito, ComposerLyricist - Ronald Gilbert, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Scala, ComposerLyricist - Emil Thielhelm, ComposerLyricist - Daking, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

12
That's All Folks
00:00:08

Unknown, ComposerLyricist - The Blues Magoos, MainArtist - Art Polhemus, Producer - Bob Wyld, Producer

℗ 1967 The Island Def Jam Music Group

Album Description

The Blues Magoos' first album, Psychedelic Lollipop, earned the band a major hit single, "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet," and in the grand tradition of striking while the iron was hot, the New York-based quintet were back with their second LP, 1967's Electric Comic Book, less than five months later. The sophomore effort is a noticeably more ambitious piece of work than the Magoos' debut, and while psychedelia was a catchphrase more than anything else on the first record, Electric Comic Book sounds trippier and a bit more expansive by comparison (the goofy "Intermission" tosses in some fairly obvious marijuana and cocaine references which would have been almost unthinkable in 1966, and the drug angle in "Pipe Dream" isn't exactly subtle). In addition, a few months of playing live had tightened up a combo who already sounded pretty good together, as well as bolstering the confidence in Ralph Scala's vocals and keyboard work and the fuzzy interplay of guitarists Mike Esposito and Emil "Peppy" Thielhelm. However, the blues and R&B elements that were a large part of Psychedelic Lollipop's strength have faded into the background here (except for a overdone cover of Jimmy Reed's "Let's Get Together"), and though the band could come up with a respectable pop tune, "Baby, I Want You" and "Take My Love" sound like throw-aways that were tossed together quickly to fill out a record not quite 30 minutes long (though "Take My Love" does have the very memorable line "Take my love and shove it up your heart"). Psychedelic Lollipop is well short of a classic, but overall it's a stronger and more coherent set of songs than Electric Comic Book, which sounds like the quickly recorded follow-up that it truly was, though it does have moments that suggest the band could have made another album as good as the debut with a bit more time and attention.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

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