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Reggae - Released October 19, 1973 | Tuff Gong

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The Wailers' fourth album overall, Burnin', was their second for Island Records, released only six months after its predecessor, Catch a Fire. Given that speed, it's not surprising that several tracks -- "Put It On," "Small Axe," and "Duppy Conqueror" -- are re-recordings of songs dating back a few years. But they fit in seamlessly with the newer material, matching its religious militancy and anthemic style. The confrontational nature of the group's message is apparent immediately in the opening track, "Get Up, Stand Up," as stirring a song as any that emerged from the American Civil Rights movement a decade before. The Wailers are explicit in their call to violence, a complete reversal from their own 1960s "Simmer Down" philosophy. Here, on "Burnin' and Lootin'," they take issue with fellow Jamaican Jimmy Cliff's song of the previous year, "Many Rivers to Cross," asking impatiently, "How many rivers do we have to cross/Before we can talk to the boss?" "I Shot the Sheriff," the album's most celebrated song, which became a number one hit in the hands of Eric Clapton in 1974, claims self-defense, admits consequences ("If I am guilty I will pay"), and emphasizes the isolated nature of the killing ("I didn't shoot no deputy"), but its central image is violent. Such songs illuminated the desperation of poor Jamaican life, but they also looked forward to religious salvation, their themes accentuated by the compelling rhythms and the alternating vocals of the three singers. Bob Marley was a first among equals, of course, and after this album his partners, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer, quit the group, which thereafter was renamed Bob Marley and the Wailers. The three bonus tracks on the 2001 reissue are all by Tosh and Wailer, though recorded at the album's sessions, suggesting the source of their frustration. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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World - Released January 1, 2001 | Tuff Gong

The Wailers' fourth album overall, Burnin', was their second for Island Records, released only six months after its predecessor, Catch a Fire. Given that speed, it's not surprising that several tracks -- "Put It On," "Small Axe," and "Duppy Conqueror" -- are re-recordings of songs dating back a few years. But they fit in seamlessly with the newer material, matching its religious militancy and anthemic style. The confrontational nature of the group's message is apparent immediately in the opening track, "Get Up, Stand Up," as stirring a song as any that emerged from the American Civil Rights movement a decade before. The Wailers are explicit in their call to violence, a complete reversal from their own 1960s "Simmer Down" philosophy. Here, on "Burnin' and Lootin'," they take issue with fellow Jamaican Jimmy Cliff's song of the previous year, "Many Rivers to Cross," asking impatiently, "How many rivers do we have to cross/Before we can talk to the boss?" "I Shot the Sheriff," the album's most celebrated song, which became a number one hit in the hands of Eric Clapton in 1974, claims self-defense, admits consequences ("If I am guilty I will pay"), and emphasizes the isolated nature of the killing ("I didn't shoot no deputy"), but its central image is violent. Such songs illuminated the desperation of poor Jamaican life, but they also looked forward to religious salvation, their themes accentuated by the compelling rhythms and the alternating vocals of the three singers. Bob Marley was a first among equals, of course, and after this album his partners, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer, quit the group, which thereafter was renamed Bob Marley and the Wailers. The three bonus tracks on the 2001 reissue are all by Tosh and Wailer, though recorded at the album's sessions, suggesting the source of their frustration. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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World - Released January 1, 2001 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Catch a Fire was the major label debut for Bob Marley and the Wailers, and it was an international success upon its release in 1973. Although Bob Marley may have been the main voice, every member of the Wailers made valuable contributions and they were never more united in their vision and sound. All the songs were originals, and the instrumentation was minimalistic in order to bring out the passionate, often politically charged lyrics. Much of the appeal of the album lies in its sincerity and sense of purpose -- these are streetwise yet disarmingly idealistic young men who look around themselves and believe they might help change the world through music. Marley sings about the current state of urban poverty ("Concrete Jungle") and connects the present to past injustices ("Slave Driver"), but he is a not a one-trick pony. He is a versatile songwriter who also excels at singing love songs such as his classic "Stir It Up." Peter Tosh sings the lead vocal on two of his own compositions -- his powerful presence and immense talent hint that he would eventually leave for his own successful solo career. More than anything else, however, this marks the emergence of Bob Marley and the international debut of reggae music. Marley would continue to achieve great critical and commercial success during the 1970s, but Catch a Fire is one of the finest reggae albums ever. This album is essential for any music collection. © Vik Iyengar /TiVo
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Reggae - Released May 22, 2020 | Sony Music Latin

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Reggae - Released August 21, 2020 | Sony Music Latin

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Reggae - Released June 19, 2020 | Tafari Records

In 1976, U Roy was the star attraction of Jamaican music. With his first hit Wake the Town released six years earlier, he brought a new style to Kingston’s soundsystems, which involved covering local hits and “toasting” (a kind of lyrical chanting) around the choruses. That particular year, he took Soul Rebel by The Wailers and transformed it into Natty Rebel, which is still his biggest hit to this day. Fifty years later, U Roy - who is approaching 80 - has brought out an album entirely centred around music by The Wailers. The project was instigated by American producer Gary Himelfarb a.k.a. Doctor Dread, who arrived in Jamaica in 1977 and signed the biggest names at that time to his label RAS Records including Black Uhuru, Jimmy Cliff, Bunny Wailer, Inner Circle and Gregory Isaacs.With Sanctuary Records, who also own reggae re-release giant Trojan Records, Doctor Dread obtained permission to use The Wailers' tracks recorded by Lee Perry in the early 70s. He shut himself away in a Kingston studio with U Roy, recording 14 songs in four hours (!), freestyling like in the good old days. Bunny Wailer, the last survivor of the original trio, was also there to witness this historic recording session, bringing together two icons of Jamaican reggae from the 70s. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Reggae - Released January 1, 2002 | Wagram Music

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Rock - Released October 8, 2019 | my onlyoldies fma

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Rock - Released January 6, 2021 | the legendary mary

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Rock - Released May 20, 2013 | Etiquette Records

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Rock - Released October 1, 2009 | Ace Records

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Rock - Released October 5, 2019 | my onlyoldies fmo

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Rock - Released August 13, 2021 | Tandem

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Rock - Released February 7, 2021 | down in town with sound

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Rock - Released July 2, 2018 | 69 digital

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Rock - Released March 17, 2021 | Rockkk One 1

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Rock - Released December 4, 2020 | Wings in Hell

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Rock - Released May 13, 2021 | True Music and Me

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Rock - Released July 15, 2020 | LTT brothers music

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Rock - Released January 8, 2019 | Archive Catapult