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Soul - Released August 1, 1964 | Motown

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Even though this long-player was the second collection to have featured the original Supremes lineup with Mary Wilson, Florence Ballard and Diana Ross, Where Did Our Love Go (1964) was the first to significantly impact the radio-listening and record-buying public. It effectively turned the trio -- who were called the 'No-Hit Supremes' by Motown insiders -- into one of the label's most substantial acts of the 1960s. Undoubtedly, their success was at least in part due to an influx of fresh material from the formidable composing/production team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland (HDH). They had already proven themselves by presenting "(Your Love Is Like A) Heatwave" to Martha & the Vandellas and providing Marvin Gaye with "Can I Get a Witness." Motown-head Berry Gordy hoped HDH could once again strike gold -- and boy, did they ever. Equally as impressive is that the Supremes were among the handful of domestic acts countering the initial onslaught of the mid-'60s British Invasion with a rapid succession of four Top 40 sides. Better still, "Where Did Our Love Go," "Baby Love" and "Come See About Me" made it all the way to the top, while "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes" (number 23), "Run, Run, Run" (number 93) and "A Breath Taking Guy" (number 75) were able to garner enough airplay and sales to make it into the Top 100 Pop Singles survey. HDH weren't the only contributors to the effort, as William "Smokey" Robinson supplied the catchy doo wop influenced "Long Gone Lover," as well as the aforementioned "Breath Taking Guy." Norman Whitfield penned the mid-tempo ballad "He Means The World to Me," and former Moonglow Harvey Fuqua co-wrote "Your Kiss of Fire." With such a considerable track list, it is no wonder Where Did Our Love Go landed in the penultimate spot on the Pop Album chart for four consecutive weeks in September of '64 -- making it the best received LP from Motown to date. In 2004, the internet-based Hip-O Select issued the double-disc Where Did Our Love Go [Expanded 40th Anniversary Edition] in a limited pressing of 10,000 copies. The package included the monaural and stereo mixes, plus a never before available seven-song vintage live set from the Twenty Grand Club in Detroit and another 17 unreleased studio cuts documented around the same time. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 1966 | Motown

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Soul - Released January 1, 2003 | UTV - Motown

Surprisingly, very few artists can float a digital-age collection of number one singles without resorting to trickery involving foreign countries or obscure charts. The Beatles had little trouble (The Beatles 1) and Elvis Presley managed both a disc of number ones (Elvis: 30 #1 Hits) and one of number twos (2nd to None), but Michael Jackson bent the rules so far that calling his disc Number Ones is tantamount to consumer fraud. Additionally, a collection of number one singles may not be the best representation of an artist's career; the Elvis volume included nothing from his Sun years, and the Beatles' set skipped "Strawberry Fields Forever." The #1's, Motown's collection of chart-toppers by Diana Ross & the Supremes, fares much better. It benefits from two Supremes characteristics: as a pop group through and through, their biggest hits were often their best songs, and, with the help of the solo Diana Ross, they spent a long time on the charts (nearly 20 years separates the Supremes' debut at the top from Ross' last number one single). While Motown's separate volumes on Diana Ross and the Supremes (in the Ultimate Collection series) remain the best source for a single-disc picture of either act, The #1's works remarkably well. It includes 19 number one pop singles (13 from the group, six from the solo Ross), plus various number ones on the R&B and dance charts, and there aren't any glaring omissions. Granted, fans of early Motown can't live without the girl-group chestnuts "Buttered Popcorn" and "Your Heart Belongs to Me," while those who enjoy latter-day Ross won't find "One More Chance" or "Why Do Fools Fall in Love?" -- but of course, this collection wasn't created with them in mind. For the group who recorded more hit singles during the '60s than any other act except the Beatles, and for one of the reigning solo artists of the '70s, The #1's is a worthy tribute. © John Bush /TiVo
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Soul - Released July 23, 1965 | Motown

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Its title might lead one to think this was a compilation, but it wasn't -- rather, More Hits by the Supremes is merely a valid presumption of its worth. It was also the original group's third highest charting album of their five years on Motown, and came not a moment too soon. The Supremes were doing incredibly well as a singles act, but not since Where Did Our Love Go had any of their LPs done particularly well on the pop charts; even a well-intentioned Sam Cooke-tribute album recorded early in 1965, which ought to have done better, had only reached number 75 (though it had gotten to number five on the R&B LP charts). "Stop! In the Name of Love" and "Back in My Arms Again" helped drive the sales, but those singles had been out six and three months earlier at the time this album surfaced -- listeners were delighted to find those singles surrounded by their ethereal rendition of the ballad "Whisper You Love Me Boy" with its exquisitely harmonized middle chorus; the gently soulful, sing-song-y "The Only Time I'm Happy"; and the sweetly dramatic "He Holds His Own" (with a gorgeous and very prominent piano accompaniment). The material dated across six months of work, from late 1964 through the spring of 1965 (apart from "Ask Any Girl," the B-side of "Baby Love," which was cut in the spring of 1964), and showed that Motown could put a Supremes album together piecemeal around the Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team and place the trio right up at the top reaches of the charts, in the company of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, et al. Its release also opened a floodgate of killer albums by the trio -- overlooking their 1965 LP of Christmas songs, they were destined to issue three more long-players that delighted audiences a dozen songs at a time over the next two years, which was a lot of good work. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2015 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Christmas albums are usually done to appease recording artists who have had some success; they rarely sell well because the holiday season is short, but some disprove the stereotype and sell seemingly forever -- like this one. The Supremes put their warm harmonies on 12 classic Christmas songs, everything from "White Christmas" to a rousing "Joy to the World." Diana Ross' angelic, sweet, innocent voice is a perfect match for favorites like "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" and "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town." A trio of producers contributed to make this an unforgettable classic: Hal Davis, Harvey Fuqua (Moonglows), and Marc Gordon (who later managed the 5th Dimension). Unlike the Temptations, who recorded three Christmas albums, the Supremes only waxed one. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 23, 1967 | Motown

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Soul - Released October 24, 2011 | UNI - MOTOWN

Diana Ross may not have had the best or strongest voice in the Supremes (Flo Ballard, by all accounts and evidence, was the best singer in the group), but she had the look, grace and style to make the Supremes extremely marketable in an era when television appearances were beginning to be a quick, clear way to sell singles. But even more than Ross' sultry appearance out front, the Supremes stood out as more than just another girl group in the '60s because of the material they were given to sing by Motown's amazing songwriting stable, most notably the writing team of Holland-Dozier-Holland, and in a time when AM radio was dominated by the Beatles and the British Invasion bands, the Supremes more than held their own with classic and enduring singles like “Baby Love,” “Come See About Me,” “Stop! In the Name of Love,” “Back in My Arms Again,” “You Can’t Hurry Love,” and “You Keep Me Hangin’ On,” among others. This attractive box celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Supremes’ first single release, “I Want a Guy” b/w “Never Again,” in 1961 by bringing together all of the group’s singles between then and 1969 on three discs. The end result is an impressive legacy. These are the sides that made the Supremes the most successful girl group in the history of pop. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Soul - Released October 7, 1997 | UNI - MOTOWN

For those who believe the Supremes' best work can be found within the bounds of their many hits, this edition of Motown's solid, late-'90s repackaging job will be the collection to get. Covering the seraphic vocal group's prime stretch, the 25-track set (nine short of the previous -- and arguably still superior -- Anthology package) includes all the big hits, plus two fine Temptations collaborations ("I'm Gonna Make You Love Me," "I'll Try Something New") and relative obscurities from the latter days ("The Composer," "No Matter What Sign You Are"). Featuring top-drawer production by Holland-Dozier-Holland, label-chief Barry Gordy, Frank Wilson, and a young Ashford & Simpson, Diana Ross & the Supremes' Ultimate Collection makes for a very enjoyable way to get cozy with one of soul music's most regal vocal-harmony groups. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Soul - Released September 28, 2008 | UNI - MOTOWN

The Supremes, like most of Motown's impressive roster of artists, were essentially geared and groomed to produce great singles, and thanks to the brilliant Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team, that's exactly what the Supremes did between 1961 and 1969. A dozen of the group's singles hit number one on the pop charts, an amazing achievement, and with songs like "Come See About Me," "Back in My Arms Again," "My World Is Empty Without You," and "You Can't Hurry Love," to name just a few, it's easy to hear why. This 18-track collection boils everything down to the essential singles, and for most listeners, it'll be all they will ever need. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Soul - Released March 25, 1968 | UNI - MOTOWN

Their last album with Holland-Doizer-Holland at the creative helm, it was apparent that both parties were battling creative fatigue and were exhibiting the appropriate scars at the time. But aside from the then-innovative title song and the jazzy "In and Out of Love," there's nothing much to get excited about. (Note: the CD version contains two extra tracks, one being a lackluster rendition of "Stay in My Lonely Arms" that pales next to the Elgins' original). © John Lowe /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2004 | Motown

I Hear a Symphony has some great soul numbers on it, mostly by the Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team, including not only the title track but also "Any Girl in Love (Knows What I'm Going Through)," "My World Is Empty Without You," and "He's All I Got" -- the latter is one of the greatest album tracks the group ever recorded, with stunning vocals by Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard behind Diana Ross, showing the trio in just about its peak form. Other parts of I Hear a Symphony seem to take its title track almost literally, with the inclusion of the majestic "Unchained Melody" and the Bach-based "A Lover's Concerto"; the latter, in particular, is a Diana Ross tour de force, with very sweetly understated accompaniment by Wilson and Ballard. And elsewhere, Berry Gordy was pushing his vision of the Supremes as a mainstream pop trio, covering "A Stranger in Paradise," "With a Song in My Heart," "Without a Song," and "Wonderful, Wonderful." None of these are bad, but neither are they terribly distinguished -- the group even adds a certain fresh sparkle to "Wonderful, Wonderful," but realistically, people were paying their money for the Holland-Dozier-Holland and Eddie Holland-authored songs, any of which would have made about as fine singles as anything the trio ever put out, and all of which are still a chunk of the best part of the group's legacy. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Soul - Released December 9, 1962 | Motown

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Soul - Released March 21, 2002 | UNI - MOTOWN

This release marks the fourth time a Supremes collection titled Anthology has hit the racks. Fans can be forgiven for getting confused, even aggravated, as to which one should be selected above others, as all of them contain the basic big hits for which the group is known. Motown keeps tweaking the precise track lineup with each edition, however, as they have for this two-CD, 50-track set. First off, if you're starting from scratch and just want a good greatest-hits collection, this is very good, and you won't have any regrets after purchase. The key thing to keep in mind is that it covers only the Diana Ross years, and doesn't reach into the 1970s for the clutch of hits the group landed without her. It has all of their 1960s chart singles, though, including duets with the Temptations and some low-charting ones that aren't familiar, from 1962's "Your Heart Belongs to Me" to 1969's "No Matter What Sign You Are." Along the way are some odd B-sides, album tracks, and rarities, like their early-'60s singles "I Want a Guy" and "Buttered Popcorn," and their Phil Spector-produced 1966 public service announcement "Things Are Changing." The ten covers at the end grouped under the heading "Supreme Stylists" are padding, as the group takes a shot at material from the Beatles to Disney and Broadway, but they do reflect an aspect of the Supremes that was represented on their albums and in their live performances. As for the three previously unreleased items here, you've gotta be real hardcore to shell out for the whole set if you already have most of the songs, as they comprise an extended version of "Love Is Like an Itching in My Heart," an alternate mix of "You Keep Me Hanging On," and a stereo mix of "He." Also, the version of "Buttered Popcorn" is the first pressing, and was previously unavailable on album. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Soul - Released August 25, 1966 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Supremes A' Go-Go was the group's first number one pop album, propelled to that place with help from a chart-topping single ("You Can't Hurry Love") and a marketing ploy that generated an irresistible song lineup. And along with The Supremes Sing Holland-Dozier-Holland, Supremes A' Go-Go has held its value better than almost any of the trio's most successful albums (which excludes We Remember Sam Cooke) -- in fact, back in the days when vinyl was the only game in town, used copies of this record sold faster and better than any of their other common '60s LPs, and for good reason. Various hits compilations had skimmed the most familiar songs off of Where Did Our Love Go, I Hear a Symphony, etc., but the very concept behind Supremes A' Go-Go -- getting the group to cover some of the top hits of other (mostly Motown) acts -- dictated that every song on this album was familiar in name, and only "You Can't Hurry Love" was culled for any hits packages. There was a lot to recommend it musically, including the trio soaring rendition of "Shake Me, Wake Me" and a version of "Get Ready," which, even if it was no threat to the Temptations, still could have been a hit. Similarly, "Baby I Need Your Lovin'" and "I Can't Help Myself" will always belong to the Four Tops, but Diana Ross, Mary Wilson, and Florence Ballard throw themselves into both (in a less weighty version of the former) with enough spirit to make them work as album cuts; "Money" is diverting if less successful, and "Come and Get These Memories" is worth checking out just to hear Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson step forward. And even the non-Motown covers, like "These Boot Are Made for Walkin'" and "Hang on Sloopy," make worthwhile listening, with Ross turning in a surprisingly strong, passionate performance on the latter. A number one album in its time on the pop and R&B charts, Supremes A' Go-Go also benefited from the fact that there were no pop standards or slow ballads here, just solid R&B dance numbers. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2000 | UNI - MOTOWN

What more could you want, two great groups, 11 great songs, and classic Motown productions. Contains the super groups' big hit "I'm Gonna Make You Love Me" and the equally effervescent "I'll Try Something New." But the goodies don't stop there: Check "Try It Baby," a remake of Marvin Gaye's hit, done this time with bass Melvin Franklin groaning lead lines to Diana Ross' soprano; Diana and Dennis Edwards recreate Marvin and Tammi on a rousing version of "Ain't No Mountain High Enough"; smooth tenor-singing Otis Williams does a silky rendition of "This Guy's in Love With You"; and Paul Williams is forever Paul as the prominent voice on "Then," an old Four Tops album cut. Originally released in 1969, this is a CD every Temptations, Diana Ross & the Supremes, and Motown fan should have. A Holland import combines this and a following album by both groups on one CD -- 21 tracks of these delicacies. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Soul - Released April 26, 2005 | UNI - MOTOWN

With the plethora of options currently in print, the question of whether listeners need another anthology paying homage to the Supremes is entirely a valid one. With Motown's proclivity to recycle and repackage the same material, it comes as no surprise that Gold gathers together four previously issued greatest-hits compilations, Greatest Hits, Vol. 1, Vol. 2, and Vol. 3 as well as At Their Best. To their credit, Motown/Universal took great care in selecting the tracks featured on this 40-song opus, including fan favorites and the hits that took the group straight from the streets of Detroit to the top of the charts, without the inclusion of filler and obvious throwaway tracks. Die-hard fans of the girl group will most likely own all of these hits as well as the outstanding post-Diana Ross'70s Anthology issued in 2002. However, those looking for a solid compilation from one of the cornerstones of the mighty Motown music machine will find this to be an excellent reference point and most likely the only collection they'll really need on their shelves. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2006 | UNI - MOTOWN

Perhaps the weakest in the trilogy of the Frank Wilson-produced albums (a fourth, Promises Kept, was shelved), the album is redeemed by a few good songs, most notably the Clifton Davis-penned "Here Comes the Sunrise" and "Johnny Raven." The title track, however, marks the first time Mary Wilson shared the lead vocals with Jean Terrell (Wilson's unfamiliarity with the record-buying public may be the reason why the title track flopped when released as a single). © John Lowe /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2006 | UNI - MOTOWN

In 1970, a determined Supremes recorded three albums -- unprecedented for a band who'd lost a superstar lead singer. That all three albums launched hits in the Top 25 is amazing as well. New Ways But Love Stays is the second volume of this film as directed by producer Frank Wilson, containing the post-Diana Ross Supremes biggest hit, "Stoned Love." Co-written by Frank Wilson, as was the other Top Ten smash, "Up the Ladder to the Roof" from their debut with Jean Terrell on lead vocals, Right On, the two albums were recorded almost simultaneously. "Everybody's Got the Right to Love" was recorded on April 22, 1970 and released almost immediately; "Stoned Love" began recording on March 2, prior to the second hit from the Right On album. They are extraordinary girl group recordings. The cover of "Bridge Over Troubled Water" is a reinterpretation, the way a good cover should be, with sound effects and a sultry vocal -- a mixture of rock and gospel. "Come Together," "Love the One You're With," and "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye" are the other three covers on New Ways But Love Stays. This is the genius of the Supremes on their own. With Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye making inroads and developing their skills as producers and songwriters, Frank Wilson broke the girls out of the Holland-Dozier-Holland formula, bringing different flavors and styles to this class act. © Joe Viglione /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2004 | Hip-O Select

Even though this long-player was the second collection to have featured the original Supremes lineup with Mary Wilson, Florence Ballard and Diana Ross, Where Did Our Love Go (1964) was the first to significantly impact the radio-listening and record-buying public. It effectively turned the trio -- who were called the 'No-Hit Supremes' by Motown insiders -- into one of the label's most substantial acts of the 1960s. Undoubtedly, their success was at least in part due to an influx of fresh material from the formidable composing/production team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland (HDH). They had already proven themselves by presenting "(Your Love Is Like A) Heatwave" to Martha & the Vandellas and providing Marvin Gaye with "Can I Get a Witness." Motown-head Berry Gordy hoped HDH could once again strike gold -- and boy, did they ever. Equally as impressive is that the Supremes were among the handful of domestic acts countering the initial onslaught of the mid-'60s British Invasion with a rapid succession of four Top 40 sides. Better still, "Where Did Our Love Go," "Baby Love" and "Come See About Me" made it all the way to the top, while "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes" (number 23), "Run, Run, Run" (number 93) and "A Breath Taking Guy" (number 75) were able to garner enough airplay and sales to make it into the Top 100 Pop Singles survey. HDH weren't the only contributors to the effort, as William "Smokey" Robinson supplied the catchy doo wop influenced "Long Gone Lover," as well as the aforementioned "Breath Taking Guy." Norman Whitfield penned the mid-tempo ballad "He Means The World to Me," and former Moonglow Harvey Fuqua co-wrote "Your Kiss of Fire." With such a considerable track list, it is no wonder Where Did Our Love Go landed in the penultimate spot on the Pop Album chart for four consecutive weeks in September of '64 -- making it the best received LP from Motown to date. In 2004, the internet-based Hip-O Select issued the double-disc Where Did Our Love Go [Expanded 40th Anniversary Edition] in a limited pressing of 10,000 copies. The package included the monaural and stereo mixes, plus a never before available seven-song vintage live set from the Twenty Grand Club in Detroit and another 17 unreleased studio cuts documented around the same time. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2006 | Hip-O Select