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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2010 | Verve

The Puppini Sisters (who aren't really named Puppini and aren't really sisters) take on the Christmas season with their third album, an eclectic collection touching on their neo-swing tendencies. This is a British trio (their accents slip in on the occasional syllable here and there) who may take after the Andrews Sisters overtly, but who, on the evidence of this disc, are at least as interested in George Michael and Mariah Carey as they are in Bing Crosby and Patty Andrews. So, for example, they revive the 1980s Wham! hit "Last Christmas" (much more of a hit in the U.K. than in the U.S.), a catchy if melancholy ballad, as well as Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You." But they also traipse back to the ‘40s and ‘50s for Crosby- and Crosby/Andrews-related numbers like "White Christmas" and "Mele Kalikimaka." Their jazziest reading, actually, is "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" (here called simply "Let It Snow"), although their singing can't really be called jazz since the scatting and re-harmonizing clearly were worked out in advance and rehearsed, not improvised on the spot. That's the way the Andrews Sisters did it, too, of course, and the Puppini Sisters remain as much a tribute act as a revitalization of several eras of pop. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Booklet
Described as "the Andrews Sisters on acid," Anglo-Italian vocal trio the Puppini Sisters' sound and style are so steeped in the golden era of the silver screen that it's surprising it's taken this long for the concept of their fourth album, Hollywood, to materialize. An affectionate homage to the glamorous film stars of the '40s and '50s, its selection of show-stopping numbers from various classic musicals may be fairly predictable, but luckily, their new arrangements allow the retro-burlesque revivalists to make their own mark on the proceedings. Judy Garland's signature number, "Get Happy," is transformed into a toe-tapping folksy hoedown, with its plucked banjo riffs, jaunty violins, and lolloping percussion; West Side Story's "I Feel Pretty" is turned into a charming Gallic waltz; while Breakfast at Tiffany's "Moon River" is given an inventively haunting makeover, with an eerie theremin accompanying its sweeping strings and hushed ghostly harmonies. Elsewhere, the group members showcase their bilingual skills on Brigitte Bardot's playful tongue-twister "Moi Je Joue" and the French version of The Godfather's "Speak Softly Love" ("Parle Plus Bas"), channel the spirit of Marilyn Monroe on a stylish rendition of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes' "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend," and provide just the right amount of sassiness for the infectious swing of Girl Crazy's "I Got Rhythm." There are a few curve balls, such as the title track (the album's sole original composition), which could easily be mistaken for an old-fashioned jazz-hands number with its triumphant brass section and rumbling double bass, while Mika's "Grace Kelly" -- neatly fitting in with the cinematic theme -- is a clever more contemporary addition that best showcases their three-part doo wop harmonies. The problems with such obvious pastiches is that it's sometimes hard to see why fans of these vintage show tunes wouldn't just seek out the originals instead. But by giving them a subtle twist, the Puppini Sisters have created an intriguing and inventive tribute that stands on its own merit. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Lounge - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca (UMO)

On record you can't see the many costume changes into stunning '30s vintage dresses, or be impressed by the trio's mugging or musical chops -- Marcella Puppini plays piano and accordion and Stephanie O'Brien plays credible jazz fiddle. This leaves the vocalizing, and while the trio isn't half bad, its members are not spectacular or particularly adventurous singers. On their second album they follow the template of their first. There are a couple of standards including "It Don't Mean a Think If It Ain't Got That Swing," and contemporary numbers -- "Spooky," "Walk Like an Egyptian" -- delivered in '40s vocal trio-style arrangements. Fine as far as it goes, but the joke is wearing thin. The Puppini Sisters' salvation is clearly in their original material. All three Sisters write solid tunes; the sooner they can come up with a full album's worth of original tunes, the better their career prospects will be. Puppini's "I Can't Believe I'm Not a Millionaire" is a blues full of arch humor, and her "Jilted" sounds like it would have been a natural for Peggy Lee, a sultry, sexy tune with a strong hook and a great lyric. O'Brien contributes "Soho Nights" a jump tune with a strong vocal arrangement, a perfect evocation of the era they obviously love. Kate Mullins may be the strongest writer of the three. Her "It's Not Over (Death or the Toy Piano)" is another song in the big-band mode, but its complex melody and inventive lyric make it one of the album's strongest tracks. © j. poet /TiVo
CD€13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Described as "the Andrews Sisters on acid," Anglo-Italian vocal trio the Puppini Sisters' sound and style are so steeped in the golden era of the silver screen that it's surprising it's taken this long for the concept of their fourth album, Hollywood, to materialize. An affectionate homage to the glamorous film stars of the '40s and '50s, its selection of show-stopping numbers from various classic musicals may be fairly predictable, but luckily, their new arrangements allow the retro-burlesque revivalists to make their own mark on the proceedings. Judy Garland's signature number, "Get Happy," is transformed into a toe-tapping folksy hoedown, with its plucked banjo riffs, jaunty violins, and lolloping percussion; West Side Story's "I Feel Pretty" is turned into a charming Gallic waltz; while Breakfast at Tiffany's "Moon River" is given an inventively haunting makeover, with an eerie theremin accompanying its sweeping strings and hushed ghostly harmonies. Elsewhere, the group members showcase their bilingual skills on Brigitte Bardot's playful tongue-twister "Moi Je Joue" and the French version of The Godfather's "Speak Softly Love" ("Parle Plus Bas"), channel the spirit of Marilyn Monroe on a stylish rendition of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes' "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend," and provide just the right amount of sassiness for the infectious swing of Girl Crazy's "I Got Rhythm." There are a few curve balls, such as the title track (the album's sole original composition), which could easily be mistaken for an old-fashioned jazz-hands number with its triumphant brass section and rumbling double bass, while Mika's "Grace Kelly" -- neatly fitting in with the cinematic theme -- is a clever more contemporary addition that best showcases their three-part doo wop harmonies. The problems with such obvious pastiches is that it's sometimes hard to see why fans of these vintage show tunes wouldn't just seek out the originals instead. But by giving them a subtle twist, the Puppini Sisters have created an intriguing and inventive tribute that stands on its own merit. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released March 11, 2016 | Millionaire Records Ltd

Hi-Res
The Puppini Sisters' fifth studio album, The High Life, is the trio's first with Emma Smith joining original members Marcella Puppini and Kate Mullins. Aside from new membership, the vocal group stays the course, offering more of their close-knit, three-part harmonies on versions of big-band classics, a couple of original songs, and swing era-inspired rearrangements of more contemporary hits. The trio holds a few surprises in its selections of the latter, such as a medley of the Sugarhill Gang's "Rapper's Delight" and Sia's "Chandelier," and a fluid cover of Missy Elliott's "Work It." Their take on "Rapper's Delight" works especially well, riding the original's natural swing. The bass-driven medley eases back and forth between the rap classic and 2014's "Chandelier" with scatting and melodic percussion, and proves to be a highlight of The High Life. Not as much fun is their David Bowie cover, a piano-led, rim-clicking arrangement of "Changes" that comes off more like an exercise than a reinvention. They're back in form on "Material Girls Medley," though, which includes pieces of several female-led, money-themed songs, including Meghan Trainor's "Dear Future Husband" and Rihanna's "Bitch Better Have My Money." All of the above are worked into the set list alongside expectedly capable versions '30s and '40s classics, such as Arlen-Mercer's "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive," and the even earlier Brazilian work with many versions including a film appearance by Carmen Miranda, "Tico Tico" (aka "Tico-Tico No Fubá"). Ultimately, as on past albums, the Puppini Sisters thrive on the original tunes, which were written with their distinct delivery in mind. "Is This the High Life" employs a clarinet, piano, bass, and drum combo to support a rhythmic melody that slides between solo vocals and full three-part harmony, and for a taste of the women at their most Andrews Sisters, don't miss "We Love to Bebop." © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released March 11, 2016 | Millionaire Records Ltd

CD€13.99

Lounge - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca (UMO)

On record you can't see the many costume changes into stunning '30s vintage dresses, or be impressed by the trio's mugging or musical chops -- Marcella Puppini plays piano and accordion and Stephanie O'Brien plays credible jazz fiddle. This leaves the vocalizing, and while the trio isn't half bad, its members are not spectacular or particularly adventurous singers. On their second album they follow the template of their first. There are a couple of standards including "It Don't Mean a Think If It Ain't Got That Swing," and contemporary numbers -- "Spooky," "Walk Like an Egyptian" -- delivered in '40s vocal trio-style arrangements. Fine as far as it goes, but the joke is wearing thin. The Puppini Sisters' salvation is clearly in their original material. All three Sisters write solid tunes; the sooner they can come up with a full album's worth of original tunes, the better their career prospects will be. Puppini's "I Can't Believe I'm Not a Millionaire" is a blues full of arch humor, and her "Jilted" sounds like it would have been a natural for Peggy Lee, a sultry, sexy tune with a strong hook and a great lyric. O'Brien contributes "Soho Nights" a jump tune with a strong vocal arrangement, a perfect evocation of the era they obviously love. Kate Mullins may be the strongest writer of the three. Her "It's Not Over (Death or the Toy Piano)" is another song in the big-band mode, but its complex melody and inventive lyric make it one of the album's strongest tracks. © j. poet /TiVo
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca (UMO)

Poised somewhere between the Andrews Sisters and Nouvelle Vague, the Puppini Sisters modernize vocal harmony pop while keeping its "so traditional, it's hip" appeal. On their debut Betcha Bottom Dollar, the Sisters' style is their substance; it's not a coincidence that the founding Puppini, Marcella, worked for fashion icon Vivienne Westwood before forming the group. Fortunately, the trio's style -- vintage '40s outfits, cheeky covers of new wave and post-punk classics and all -- manages to stay on the likeable, not grating, side of kitsch. Taken individually, the trio's voices aren't spectacular, but they blend together nicely enough to create a convincing homage to the heyday of vocal harmony pop in the '30s and '40s. A very pleasant "Mr. Sandman," a pretty, languid "Java Jive" and "Sway" are among the best vocal pop standards on Betcha Bottom Dollar, but interestingly enough, the Puppini Sisters often sound less campy on the songs they remake than on the classics. Not surprisingly, the original versions of the tracks they've chosen to give three-part harmony makeovers have strong melodies and distinctive singers, so it's not really all that surprising that Kate Bush's "Wuthering Heights" sounds lovely with three-part harmonies, or that their version of Blondie's "Heart of Glass" fits right in with "Mr. Sandman." There are times on Betcha Bottom Dollar that things feel a little too knowing and ironic, as on the chirpy cover of the Smiths' "Panic," and the album might be a little too long for the mood it's trying to sustain. On the whole, however, the genuine affection for the styles the Puppini Sisters adopt and adapt saves Betcha Bottom Dollar from being insufferably cutesy. © Heather Phares /TiVo
CD€14.99

Lounge - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca (UMO)

On record you can't see the many costume changes into stunning '30s vintage dresses, or be impressed by the trio's mugging or musical chops -- Marcella Puppini plays piano and accordion and Stephanie O'Brien plays credible jazz fiddle. This leaves the vocalizing, and while the trio isn't half bad, its members are not spectacular or particularly adventurous singers. On their second album they follow the template of their first. There are a couple of standards including "It Don't Mean a Think If It Ain't Got That Swing," and contemporary numbers -- "Spooky," "Walk Like an Egyptian" -- delivered in '40s vocal trio-style arrangements. Fine as far as it goes, but the joke is wearing thin. The Puppini Sisters' salvation is clearly in their original material. All three Sisters write solid tunes; the sooner they can come up with a full album's worth of original tunes, the better their career prospects will be. Puppini's "I Can't Believe I'm Not a Millionaire" is a blues full of arch humor, and her "Jilted" sounds like it would have been a natural for Peggy Lee, a sultry, sexy tune with a strong hook and a great lyric. O'Brien contributes "Soho Nights" a jump tune with a strong vocal arrangement, a perfect evocation of the era they obviously love. Kate Mullins may be the strongest writer of the three. Her "It's Not Over (Death or the Toy Piano)" is another song in the big-band mode, but its complex melody and inventive lyric make it one of the album's strongest tracks. © j. poet /TiVo
CD€2.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca (UMO)

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Contemporary Jazz - To be released September 4, 2020 | Millionaire Records Ltd

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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 7, 2020 | Millionaire Records Ltd

CD€1.99

Contemporary Jazz - Released May 15, 2020 | Millionaire Records Ltd

CD€1.99

Contemporary Jazz - Released March 6, 2020 | Millionaire Records Ltd

CD€2.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca (UMO)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca (UMO)