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Rock - Released April 16, 2021 | Concord Records

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Rock - Released November 16, 1998 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

With integrity intact and a hearty combination of poppy punk and wit throughout, the Offspring's fifth album is a raucous ride through America as seen through the eyes of a weary, but still optimistic, young kid. Riffs on political correctness, '70s radio fodder, and suburban disquiet are spread thick on Americana. If the band's targets seem a bit simple and predictable, its music rarely is. The SoCal roots aren't played to a fault, the blend of salsa and alterna-rock sounds natural, and the Offspring pretty much laugh at their culture, as well as themselves, the entire time. Best track is "Pretty Fly (For a White Guy)," which manages to bridge Def Leppard and Latin hip-hop (and the musical timeline they represent) and, in the process, disrobes Middle America's average white teen's quick fascination with and instant disposability of a once-regional heritage. With Americana, the Offspring are merely contributing their part. © Michael Gallucci /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 8, 1994 | Epitaph

Rock - Released June 21, 2005 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

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Apparently the Offspring could keep 'em separated no longer. Greatest Hits gathers every one of the band's modern rock radio warhorses into one place. It also tacks on a new song called "Can't Repeat," which despite its name is a repeat of the 1998 single "Kids Aren't Alright." After the new opener the set moves chronologically, so its songs are like bullet points on a time line of radio and MTV in the 1990s. The breakthrough Smash hits start it out: the surf guitar wrangle "Come Out and Play," the Nirvana-baiting of "Self Esteem," and "Gotta Get Away." "All I Want" from 1997's Ixnay on the Hombre is next, and then it's the sluggish, echoing arena punk of "Gone Away." ("And it FEELS! And it FEELS LIKE! Heaven's so far away!") With that comes the switch, when Offspring tailed away from punk relativism into hyper, referential snark. "Pretty Fly (For a White Guy)" and "Why Don't You Get a Job?" get points for anticipating U.S. pop culture's slide into reality TV madness and unsafe I Want a Famous Face-style obsessions -- they have the shouty sheen of a daytime talk show and revel in empty trends and opportunism. As actual songs they're somewhat gimmicky, but in a greatest-hits context they're noteworthy snapshots. The swaggering guitars, Latin inflections, and references to Prozac and Chino make 2000's "Conspiracy of One" Los Angeles product, and Offspring fans will note the inclusion of 2001's "Defy You," originally part of the Orange County soundtrack. Greatest Hits ends with two tracks from 2003's Splinter, and "Hit That"'s boppy baby daddy drama combines the Offspring's smart alecky cultural cynicism with a raucous distortion chorus. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 17, 2008 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

It's not that the Offspring sound behind the times on their eighth album, Rise and Fall, Rage and Grace -- it's that they sound disconnected from it. They may rant about George W. Bush's America and all the crass consumerism accompanying it, but they don't seem to realize that Coldplay beat them to a power ballad called "Fix You" just three years ago, offering a different melody but the same sentiment carrying the same title (to make matters worse, another of the album's power ballads, "A Lot Like You," opens with a surge straight out of "Clocks"). They snipe at dance beats on "You're Gonna Go Far, Kid," not quite caring that the alienated adolescents who comprise the core of their audience now don't quite care whether anybody puts disco in their punk or not. This sideswipe at dance -- complete with a "dance f***er dance" chorus -- is par for the course for the Offspring, who always seems to get a neo-novelty tune out of some rhythm or fad they don't like, so things haven't changed, which is part of the problem, as the band operates in a bubble. Nothing changes their attitude or their attack, as they still favor frenzied downstroked guitars and shout-along choruses that have the inevitable effect of having all the songs kind of blend together. Still, the Offspring can't quite hide the passing of time, as they start to drift into power ballads and angsty anthems like "Kristy, Are You Doing Okay?," which feels tailor-made for a CW TV show. Such softening of their stance illustrates that it's impossible to avoid maturity, but the band would be better off injecting some maturity within the music, finding a different rhythm outside of its pummeling eighth notes, or maybe mustering a protest deeper than "S*** is F***** UP." Without this kind of maturity, the Offspring wind up offering plenty of rage but not much grace. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 17, 1996 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

The Offspring may have been a product of the Southern California hardcore scene, but their instincts have always been more metal than punk. Their guitars plod along with a heavy backbeat, and even their speedier numbers are weighed down by clumsy riffs, which is evident on Ixnay on the Hombre, the follow-up to the group's unexpected hit Smash. Despite Jello Biafra's opening assertion of the Offspring's punk credentials, Ixnay on the Hombre sounds like a competent hard rock band trying to hitch themselves to the post-grunge bandwagon. The riffs don't have hooks, and Dexter Holland yelps his vocals tunelessly. Of course, much hardcore followed this formula, but it got by on its self-righteousness and visceral forward force. Since the Offspring slow down the tempo of hardcore, it doesn't have either the undiluted rage of hardcore or the four-on-the-floor groove of hard rock. Also, they haven't come up with a ridiculous hook on the level of "Come Out and Play" or "Self Esteem," which leaves Ixnay on the Hombre as a tedious, turgid mess of anemic punk metal. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 14, 2000 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

Contrary to the popular belief of music critics, listeners and artists alike, a band that doesn't deviate from its genre on its albums isn't musically limited. There are many layers to any given genre of music, and growing into it is just as much of an accomplishment as, say, experimenting with several different categories. What's wrong with sounding the same if you get better and better at it with each album? On Conspiracy of One, the Offspring do just that, resulting in their most musically mature collection to date. The tight arrangements, vocal interplay and refined guitar work on "Original Prankster," "Want You Bad," and "Million Miles Away" sound like Offspring songs, but don't all sound the same. The band departs from its SoCal punk roots at times -- a ballad called "Denial, Revisited" provides one of the album's slower instances. They also inject elements of hip-hop, rap-metal, and Nirvana-like grunge into a few songs, giving Conspiracy of One some musical diversity, but it's subtle; the album remains firmly planted in the world of punk. Each song features Dexter Holland's lead vocals and Noodles and Holland's crafty guitar playing, the group's two defining factors. The album also features some smart lyrics, though the Offspring do have some sophomoric fun on the party anthem "One Fine Day." Conspiracy of One is a solid and well-crafted recording and offers a fine progression from a band that has no qualms about doing what they do best. © Liana Jonas /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 9, 2003 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

It's more mixing of stylized punk revival and hybridism with left-field musical experimentation and in-the-now pop culture lyrical references on Splinter, the Offspring's seventh full-length. "Never Gonna Find Me," "Long Way Home," and "Lightning Rod" each bristle with overdriven guitars and Dexter Holland's high-pitched bleating; they're somewhat workmanlike, but still roil with that precision fury particular to a veteran band. At the same time, Holland, guitarist Noodles, and bassist Greg Kriesel can't resist returning to the towel-slapping trash humor and mean-spirited loathing that typified past tracks like "Pretty Fly (For a White Guy)" and "Self Esteem." Lead single "Hit That" talks up baby daddies over a bopping bassline and keyboard right out of a Bloodhound Gang track, while "Spare Me the Details" subverts its lighthearted acoustic strum with foul-mouthed (on the clean version, anyway) attacks on a philandering girlfriend ("I'm not the one who acted like a ho"). "Da Hui" overdrives surf rock while paying homage to hardcore Hawaiian board riders, and "When You're in Prison" ends Splinter with sage advice about protecting your dignity in the clink. For whatever reason, the latter track is performed as 1930s Brill Cream dinner theater, complete with the faked crackle of an old 78 and muffled crooner vocals suggestive of a whining Victrola. The curious "Prison" renews the longstanding knock on the Offspring. They're very talented, write killer hooks, and can really crank up a punk rock racket when they want to, like on the Splinter standout "(Can't Get My) Head Around You." But the accessibility and crackling energy come shackled to crassness and frivolity, making the listener wonder whether Holland and his boys are committed to making effective music, or need to fill up albums with throwaways like the directionless "Neocon," the ska-hop predictability of "Worst Hangover Ever," or the aforementioned "Prison." It's the old saying -- the jokes were funny once, but just don't keep over time. This questioning of intent will likely be irrelevant for longtime fans. They'll be more than happy with Splinter, which crams every last piece of the Offspring puzzle -- slickly produced rock racket, hints of anti-establishment rabble-rousing, and reams of relationship and strip mall culture gaggery -- into its brief half-hour run time. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 8, 1994 | Epitaph

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Rock - Released October 16, 1992 | Epitaph

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Rock - Released June 26, 2012 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

After nearly three decades of making sunny California skatepunk, the Offspring get autumnal with their reflective ninth album, Days Go By. Though the band still maintains the same driving, hooky sound that it's always had, the album feels less aggressive and more wistful and yearning. "Days Go By" seems like punk rock tailor-made for fall weather with its meditations on the impermanence of youthful anger, as if the Offspring are offering some sage advice for those coming up after them. A similar vibe courses through "All I Have Left Is You," which switches back and forth between smoothed-out verses and big, guitar-heavy choruses, like a much more adult version of the band than fans might have ever heard previously. While other parts of the album don't quite have the same adult contemporary punk feeling, the songs are generally more melodic and grown-up. While this kind of maturity is not only welcome, but expected, Days Go By also has moments that seem as if the Offspring might be starting to show their age a bit. "Pretty Fly (For a White Guy)" was corny back in 1998, making songs like "Cruising California (Bumpin' in My Trunk)" and "OC Guns" even harder to swallow 14 years later. Even though these missteps don't completely ruin the album, they seem over-produced and unnecessary amidst what is an otherwise well-crafted record. All in all, Days Go By is more for fans who have been with the band for a while than those just tuning in, and while die-hard Offspring followers will be able to see the shift in the band's sound as part of a logical progression, new listeners would be better served by checking out some of their earlier, more urgent work. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released November 4, 2020 | Concord Records

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Rock - Released August 4, 2010 | Round Hill Music (Offspring)

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Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 1995 | Nitro Records (Concord)

The Offspring's self-titled debut album is a rawer, harder-edged collection than their breakthrough set, Smash, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's a better record. Although it makes a more convincing argument for the band's punk credibility -- the record lacks the metal guitar crunch that dominated Smash -- The Offspring doesn't have any songs driven by hooks as catchy as "Keep 'Em Separated" or "Self Esteem," nor does it have the consistency of Smash. A handful of tracks make a lasting impression, but most of The Offspring is notable for its surface style, not its substance. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 20, 2021 | Concord Records

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Rock - Released August 27, 2021 | Tumbledown

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Punk / New Wave - Released November 14, 2000 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Gospel - Released November 21, 2013 | Eternal Sounds

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 23, 2018 | Time Bomb Recordings