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Rock - Released July 24, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released August 10, 2018 | Frontiers Records s.r.l.

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Rock - Released February 1, 2002 | Nuclear Blast

Channeling vintage Judas Priest while adding a touch of thrash metal dynamics and layered vocals, Primal Fear comes galloping out of the metal underground once again on Black Sun. By concentrating just a little bit harder on the heaviness of the music, the band manages to deliver a more consistently engaging product than many of their contemporaries in the power metal field. The abrasive riffing is nicely offset by the melodic guitar work, which brings to mind late-'80s Joe Satriani with its clear phrasing and fluid wankery. And there's nothing wrong with a little guitar wank when it comes to this kind of music, which is shameless in its use of dramatic riffing and button-pushing dynamics. The anthemic bravado of the catchy "Light Years From Home" is the album's true highlight, but several other songs also manage to capture that same attitude and power. The only thing that hurts the album is the dated nature of power metal, which still manages to evoke '80s horror films and jean jackets despite being years away from that time period. The album probably won't make the transition to mainstream metal fans, but anyone enamored with the power metal underground should give this bright and kinetic album a listen. © Bradley Torreano /TiVo
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Metal - Released June 2, 2017 | Frontiers Music s.r.l

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Metal - Released January 29, 2016 | Frontiers Music s.r.l

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Metal - Released November 10, 2017 | Frontiers Music s.r.l

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Rock - Released January 15, 2001 | Nuclear Blast

"...There is no denying that NUCLEAR FIRE is feel-good siren metal that makes no apologies for its excess..." © TiVo
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Rock - Released October 24, 2005 | Nuclear Blast

Love it or hate it, power metal is here to stay; and no band has done more staying than German supergroup Primal Fear, who arrive at their sixth studio release, Seven Seals (and seventh release overall, if you count 2002's Horrorscope EP -- hence the title), showing just as much conviction and, er, power, as ever before. What's more, where recent efforts had found singer Ralf Scheepers (ex-Gamma Ray, near-Rob Halford replacement) somewhat uninspired and prone to merely reminding you, again and again, how gloriously metallic metal is, here he proceeds to discuss how gloriously metallic things like demons, angels, and roller coasters are. Yes, we're hardly talking thought-provoking social commentary here, but when it comes to heroic, unapologetic, chest-pounding Teutonic metallurgy, it really doesn't get much better than album standouts like "Rollercoaster," "Evil Spell," and "The Immortal Ones," with their anthemic riffs, soaring choruses, and majestic backing synthesizer chords. The title track itself is a little more unusual, featuring a stuttering, mild-mannered melody at its core, and, although otherwise familiar in construction, surprisingly epic undertakings such as "All for One" and "Question of Honor" see Primal Fear breaking out of conventional song lengths more frequently than they'd dared in albums past. As well as obviously affording additional room for bassist/keyboardist Mat Sinner and guitarists Tom Naumann and Stefan Leibing to work their instrumental magic, this suggests a relaxing of Scheeper's "leadership" role, and arguably qualifies Seven Seals for the distinction of being Primal Fear's most consistent "band" effort yet. It probably still won't convert many power metal haters to the cause, but for those who never doubted in the first place, it only confirms the group as leaders of the movement. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 24, 2014 | Frontiers Records

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Rock - Released June 28, 1999 | Nuclear Blast

Primal Fear's sophomore effort, Jaws of Death, is essentially more of the same -- catchy riff-driven British-style metal a la Priest and Maiden, with European power-metal undertones, not unlike Helloween (unsurprisingly, since Ralf Scheepers was in the Kai Hansen project Gamma Ray). It may be derivative and too faithful to the style (especially Judas Priest's) to sound very contemporary, but it's well done nonetheless, and it is nice to hear a late '90s metal band that prizes songcraft. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 2, 1998 | Nuclear Blast

Add Primal Fear to that elite group of "true" metal warriors. Upon listening to opener "Chainbreaker," which sounded very Judas Priest inspired, a bit of investigating took place. Vocalist Ralf Scheepers used to speak the metal language for Gamma Ray and almost found himself sitting on the throne of Judas Priest, until that position was "ripped" from him. So here he is, tearing up the speedways with Primal Fear, who specializes in creating the kind of headbanging, dual guitar, and metal mayhem listeners have come to expect from Germany. The sound is huge but not complex, just thick and massively produced. Kai Hansen (Gamma Ray alumnus) lends a helping guitar hand to the metal melee, his solos sounding top-notch as always. The only complaint would have to be the semi-juvenile lyrics that take away from certain songs. Highlights from the album include the aforementioned "Dollars" (not even cornball lyrics can ruin this metal classic), "Tears of Rage," "Promised Land," "Thunderdome," and the Deep Purple cover "Speedking." So put on your jean jacket and black leather pants and get ready to pound some beers. © Jason Hundey /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 20, 2012 | Frontiers Records

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Metal - Released May 22, 2009 | Frontiers Records

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Rock - Released July 10, 2011 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released January 29, 2016 | Frontiers Music s.r.l

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Rock - Released September 29, 2006 | Nuclear Blast

This two-disc, 25-track compilation shows off European metal outfit Primal Fear at their finest. That comparative rarity, a contemporary metal band whose influences all predate the Metallica/Pantera axis, Primal Fear play defiantly old-school 1980s power metal with echoes of Judas Priest, the Scorpions and Dio, among others. Melodic and riff heavy, with a predisposition for epic fist-in-the-air choruses and the requisite guitar heroics, these songs are so defiantly out of the current day metal mainstream that, paradoxically, Metal Is Forever sounds amazingly fresh. Highlights include the apocalyptic "Seven Seals" and the extended guitar workout "Seek and Destroy," but as a whole, this is a solid encapsulation of Primal Fear's first decade as the kings of European retro-metal. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 23, 2004 | Nuclear Blast

Who needs Judas Priest when you have Primal Fear? Seriously, given the British metal gods' move towards thrash, post-1990's seminal Painkiller, the German quintet, led by former Gamma Ray frontman Ralf Scheepers (himself once considered to replace Halford) arguably sounds more like classic, '80s period Priest than the real deal. Heck, Rob Halford never shrieked a heavy metal standard-bearing anthem more gallantly (or, admittedly, shrilly) than album opener "Metal Is Forever." Yes, it is forever, my sore-necked, headbanging friends -- or at least just under an hour, going by this, the group's fifth album, Devil's Ground. Sifting through the 12 tracks on offer here: "In Metal" is another call for the metal troops to stand up and be counted, "Visions of Fate," "Soul Chaser," and "Colony 13" balance their generous doses of adrenalin with very memorable choruses, while "The Healer" and the semi-epic "Wings of Desire" are both fine, dramatic slower numbers -- mostly devoid of silly sentiment, but guaranteed to bring out those lighters just the same. And with the help of newly acquired drummer Randy Black's (borrowed from Canadian thrashers Annihilator) nifty footwork on the likes of "Sacred Illusion" and "Sea of Flames" (the latter also piercing a few eardrums courtesy of Scheepers' screams), Primal Fear does open the speed metal envelope after all. As usual, guitar solos are often as much highlights as the songs themselves, as both Stefan Leibing and returning founder Tom Naumann are capable of firing them off at will. In short, few heavy metal bands, Teutonic or otherwise, can whip out the steel like Primal Fear -- it's not very original, but its always dependable. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 21, 2007 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released August 3, 2018 | Frontiers Records s.r.l.