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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Rhino

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While he was still leader of progressive rock group Genesis, Phil Collins launched his solo career and released Face Value in 1981. A record which quickly proves to be one of the biggest musical surprises of the year, and one which allows the British artist to begin his ascension as one of the biggest stars of the 1980s. Thanks to the deep and passionate voice of the singer, as well as the numerous pop/soul ballads and his talent for aggressive rock'n'roll, this record has sold (and is currently selling) better than any installment by Genesis. The Town House studio recording sessions in London have obviously greatly inspired Collins who experiments with many studio techniques and leaves plenty of room for his own rhythm guitar, in spite of the fact that he is widely known and admired for his drumming skills. He also takes advantage of his own independence to do a tribute to black American music which is so dear to him, as he invite Phenix Horns, the prestigious brass section for Earth, Wind & Fire, to perform on the record. ©LG/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 15, 1990 | Rhino

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One year after ...But Seriously, England's best-selling album in the year of its release, Phil Collins followed up with a live worldwide tour. The former Genesis drummer was at the height of his fame, and this Berlin concert on July 15th, 1990, perfectly documents his impressive performances from that time. Surrounded by four virtuosos (Leland Sklar on bass, Daryl Stuermer on guitar, Chester Thompson on drums and Brad Cole on keyboards), here Phil Collins reveals a kind of ‘best of’ album with the hits Against All Odds (Take A Look At Me Now), One More Night, In the Air Tonight as well as a rather muscular cover of You Can't Hurry Love by The Supremes. Everything here is XL! Brass, rhythm and melodies! And the remastered edition of this live album in 24-Bit Hi-Res quality makes the experience even more powerful. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 14, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Rhino

Spawning four hit singles, But Seriously topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. While pursuing much of the same formula as on No Jacket Required, there was also a move toward more organic production as Collins abandoned some of the drum machines and prominent keyboards in the up-tempo numbers in favor of live instrumentation. The decision was a good one as there's no doubt that tracks such as "Find a Way to My Heart" and "Hang in Long Enough" have enough bite to outlast his more dated sounding mid-80s material. As usual, there are a bit too many generic ballads here, but when Collins moves out of his formula as on the dramatic gospel-influenced "I Wish it Would Rain Down," featuring Eric Clapton, the results are staggering. ~ Geoff Orens
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Rock - Released October 8, 2013 | Rhino

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With his second solo album released in November 1982, the former Genesis drummer/singer eyes a slightly more pop sound, which leans ever so wonderfully into Soul and R&B. We thus find in the heart of this Hello, I Must Be Going, a great cover of You Can't Hurry Love by Diana Ross' The Supremes, a single which would go on to top the British charts with near ease. This album, brilliantly produced by Phil Collins himself, (the 100% 80s sound ages rather well, and with the album finally remastered in 24-Bit Hi-Res, it really comes alive) is most remarkable for Collins' unique vocals combined with the unerring ability to sign off hit songs where rhythm is always at the heart. For a drummer, perhaps its not that surprising ... © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released February 1, 2019 | Rhino

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In the latter half of the '90s, Phil Collins' career hit a bit of a sales slump, and instead of shamelessly chasing after another number one single, he decided to change pace and try something different. Returning to the drums, he assembled the Phil Collins Big Band, reviving the sound of such idols as Buddy Rich and Sonny Payne, but largely sticking with his original material. After a brief European tour in 1996 (which happened to feature Quincy Jones as conductor and Tony Bennett as vocalist), he created a new version of the band featuring several accomplished jazz and studio musicians in support -- notably alto saxophonist Gerald Albright, but also guitarist Daryl Stuermer, tenor saxophonist James Carter, and pianists George Duke and Brad Cole, among many others, in varying roles. That band toured America and Europe in 1998, and it's the one featured on the ten-song, 70-minute live album A Hot Night in Paris. Initially, it may be disarming for long-time fans (and detractors) to hear "Sussudio," "That's All," and "Against All Odds" blaring forth in brash, brassy arrangements, and it is true that the melodies can occasionally sound thin in this context, but once that first reaction passes, A Hot Night in Paris is actually entertaining. Collins doesn't try anything new with the big band form -- he just updates it with his own songs, including the Genesis chestnut "The Los Endos Suite," along with covers of Miles Davis' "Milestones" and the Average White Band's "Pick up the Pieces." As such, it's the sort of record that will inevitably irk purists, since it's targeted right at mainstream jazz audiences, ones that aren't really familiar with big band music but have a vague idea of what it sounds like, but anyone whose standards aren't quite as exacting will likely be pleasantly surprised with A Hot Night in Paris. When the band just plays -- which is quite often, since the themes are stated quickly enough so they're recognized, then they disappear -- this is swinging, accomplished music that's unpretentious and fun. It's never more than simply entertaining, but that's all it needs to be -- it's more enjoyable than any record Collins has put out in over a decade, and it suggests that this is a dignified and charming way for him to mature. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released April 15, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released October 14, 2016 | Rhino

Phil Collins certainly has enough hits to fill out a double-disc compilation -- in the U.K. he had 25 Top 40 singles and he reached the Billboard Top 40 21 times in the U.S., with many of them overlapping -- but the 2016 set The Singles doesn't march through these hits in chronological order. Opening with "Easy Lover," his 1985 duet with Earth, Wind & Fire's Philip Bailey, this 33-track compilation happily hopscotches through the years. Such non-chronological sequencing does mean certain hits are saved for the greatest emotional impact -- naturally, "Take Me Home" closes out the proceedings -- but it also focuses attention on songs that weren't blockbusters, whether it's such meditative turn-of-the-'90s adult contemporary hits as "That's Just the Way It Is" or the brooding early single "Thru These Walls." Ultimately, this forced perspective is why The Singles is something more than just a collection of big hits: it helps illustrate that Collins' solo catalog ran deeper than "In the Air Tonight," "You Can't Hurry Love," "Sussudio," "One More Night," "Against All Odds," and "Another Day in Paradise." ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Rhino

Spawning four hit singles, But Seriously topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. While pursuing much of the same formula as on No Jacket Required, there was also a move toward more organic production as Collins abandoned some of the drum machines and prominent keyboards in the up-tempo numbers in favor of live instrumentation. The decision was a good one as there's no doubt that tracks such as "Find a Way to My Heart" and "Hang in Long Enough" have enough bite to outlast his more dated sounding mid-80s material. As usual, there are a bit too many generic ballads here, but when Collins moves out of his formula as on the dramatic gospel-influenced "I Wish it Would Rain Down," featuring Eric Clapton, the results are staggering. ~ Geoff Orens
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Pop - Released September 14, 2004 | Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released April 15, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released February 26, 2016 | Rhino

Dance Into the Light is as self-explanatory as titles get: after dwelling in the darkness following a divorce and a split from Genesis, Phil Collins is ready to get happy. That isn't to say Dance Into the Light is devoid of either ambition or sobriety: Collins turns "Just Another Story" into a piece of meditative funk, while "Wear My Hat," "River So Wide," and "Lorenzo" find the drummer delving into African rhythms reminiscent of Paul Simon, Peter Gabriel, and Sting (it also points toward the work Collins did on Tarzan just a few years later). Nevertheless, the overall tenor of the record is bright and cheerful, the sound of a man ready for a revival. Sometimes, he'll throw out a specific callback to his past -- the title track recalls the snappy punch of "Sussudio" -- but often, he settles into an expertly modulated craft, favoring sprightly pop to somnolent ballads. Given this chipper outlook, it's odd that the thing that undoes Dance Into the Light -- outside of the slight cognitive dissonance between the straight-ahead pop and Afrobeat explorations -- is an indulgence all too typical of '90s albums made with the CD in mind: tracks stretch out one or two minutes longer than necessary, adding up to a 13-track album that feels flabby at just over an hour. Trimmed by 20 minutes, this would've been a nice little adult pop album, but as it stands, it sounds like a lively little record attempting to escape its immaculately tailored straitjacket. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released April 15, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released April 15, 2016 | Rhino

Phil Collins took a long time to deliver Testify, his first record since redemptive post-divorce album Dance into the Light. On that 1996 affair, he was open to all the possibilities that may arrive during this new act and, accordingly, the album felt expansive. He dabbled with new sounds, perhaps excessively so, but it helped mirror his newfound freedom. In contrast, Testify feels a bit hemmed in, the sound of a singer/songwriter marching through the drudgery of life. This isn't to say that Testify is underpinned with despair -- it certainly lacks the melancholy undertow of Both Sides, one of his moodiest and best records -- but rather it feels diligent, with Collins intent on hitting all of his preordained marks. He writes songs about love gained and lost, fatherhood, and society -- all the staples of his mature work after No Jacket Required -- but his musical world-view has shrunk. Instead of attempting new sounds, he excises his eccentricities right along with his trademark thunderous drums, so Testify winds up feeling stiff, sequenced, and safe. An adult contemporary album, in other words, one that's clearly patterned after his big hit "You'll Be in My Heart," his Oscar-winning original song from 1999's Tarzan. Testify sways gently to its interlocking drum loops, a record that relies on mood, not melody. Which isn't to say this album is devoid of melody -- it's there; it's just not hooky, which is a conscious decision. Collins made Testify as a mellow meditation on everyday life, never pushing his themes or his songs too hard, and while that can mean it's pleasurable enough as background music, it also means that the album can feel a little listless, as if he's not sure what he wants to say. Given this vague aimlessness, it's not entirely a surprise that Testify turned out to be his last studio album of original material (as of this writing in 2016). ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released September 3, 2010 | Atlantic Records

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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Rhino

Nothing can slow down Phil Collins’ career. Ever since his solo studio debuts in the 1980s with the album Face Value, the discography of the former Genesis drummer has grown exponentially. Whether he plays in a band or under his own name, Diamond and Gold albums have been raining down on him! The perfect way to get too rich and big-headed. But thankfully not! Collins only lives to play and share music, as demonstrated by Plays Well With Others. An anthology album of his greatest collaborations spread over four discs, coming to a total of 59 tracks retracing the British legend’s career and his impressive performances with other artists. Disc 1 includes the 1969 to 1982 period, disc 2 the 1982 to 1991 period, disc 3 the 1991 to 2011 period and disc 4 consists of live performances recorded between 1981 and 2002. The guest list includes Brian Eno, Robert Plant, Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Annie Lennox, John Cale, Robert Fripp, Lil’ Kim, and many others. We are treated to the electric fusion of Rod Argent on I Can't Remember, But Yes, legendary live performances (You Win Again with the Bee Gees in 1998) and moving solos (I've Been Trying)… Phil Collins plucks all the emotional strings here. A voice that has held strong since his very first hits, and that fans will not forget in a hurry! © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz