Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD€19.49

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1998 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

The rarities compilation Let It Happen gathers together a bunch of MxPx demos, B-sides, alternative versions, and spare tracks into one tidy little package. Since most of these are from the early days of the trio's career, the record is pretty raw sounding, taking listeners right back into the dirty garages the band initially cut its teeth in. And though the unpolished production leaves some songs to blend right into one another, this is hardly a point of contention since the resulting music is pure and desperate, embracing that sense of urgency young bands always seem to possess (or at least should). Like many roundup releases of this nature, Let It Happen can be hit or miss at points, but at 32 tracks, there are enough true gems in here -- the cover of Social D's "Sick Boy," "GSF," "Let It Happen," "Honest Answers," "Life in General," etc., pick your favorite -- to make up for any of the sporadic letdowns. Capturing two faces of MxPx -- catchy pop-punk numbers along with more revved-up hardcore-leaning blasts -- this is well worth the purchase for any fan. ~ Corey Apar
CD€13.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

So, is MxPx's The Ultimate Collection, well, ultimate? It depends on perspective. There are no weak songs on either of the discs, and it does include many of the band's singles ("Chick Magnet," "Punk Rawk Show," and "Money Tree," to name a few), but the compilation isn't comprehensive. The songs included are from the band's earlier albums such as Teenage Politics and Life in General, as well the 2006 Deluxe Edition of Let it Happen and 2007's Secret Weapon. However, there is nothing from the albums that the band released in between -- songs from Slowly Going the Way of the Buffalo, The Ever Passing Moment, and Before Everything & After didn't make the cut. It's a strange omission, and one that doesn't make much sense -- there's plenty of room for more. Still, the songs that are present do a good job of capturing MxPx's upbeat nature, so perhaps it's a matter of quality over quantity. In the end, The Ultimate Collection could be a disappointment for longtime followers who were hoping for a bit more frills, but new or casual fans will probably find that it suits their needs just fine. ~ Katherine Fulton
CD€19.49

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1995 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

CD€13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

Ever since MxPx released their first covers album in 1995, fans have been chomping at the bit for another one. On the Cover II finds the guys finally relenting almost 15 years later, and those who have waited it out will like what they find here. The record's 12 songs are mostly all pulled from the '80s, gleaned off a list of the trio's influences and personal favorites -- both the expected (the Clash), and the more random (the jangly pop-punk of "Linda Linda" from Japanese punkers the Blue Hearts). For the most part, MxPx handle the cover album as any other punk band would -- they speed things the hell up. This works great more times than not, as with U2's "I Will Follow," but especially enjoyable are their faithful renditions of no-brainer punk songs, like the Dead Milkmen's most excellent "Punk Rock Girl" and the Descendents' "Suburban Home." And while their version of the Clash's "Should I Stay or Should I Go" sticks out as rather standard issue -- and really you'd be better off just listening to the original -- it's at least nice to hear guitarist Tom Wisniewski handling vocals for a change. Overall, it's the few moments when MxPx step a bit further out of their comfort zone that they really shine and sidestep complete predictability. Poison's "Fallen Angel" comes out surprisingly well given the pop-punk treatment, and the help of friends allows MxPx to successfully tackle some songs that on paper seem like they would only be disasters -- the Rocket Summer's precious Bryce Avary lends colorful vocals to Queen's "Somebody to Love" (hitting the high notes Mike Herrera no doubt wouldn't even attempt) and ex-Tsunami Bomb's Agent M leads the charge on Belinda Carlisle's giddy "Heaven Is a Place on Earth." So while fans will definitely be satisfied with all of the songs on this album, at the end of the day, it's really those unanticipated tracks that will make On the Cover II worth the listen for everyone else. ~ Corey Apar
CD€14.99

Rock - Released June 16, 1998 | A&M

CD€14.99

Rock - Released September 16, 2003 | A&M

CD€13.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

Secret Weapon is a return to form for MxPx in more ways than just continuing the back-to-basics approach of 2005's Panic. The Bremerton pop-punks have returned to their original label home, Tooth & Nail (the prior falling out between the two now water under the bridge), and they're working with original producer Aaron Sprinkle, who was at the controls for their debut. Whether or not these factors really had anything to do with the band sounding as revitalized as it does is up for debate, but regardless, as soon as the lead title track leaps from speakers amid fierce, machine-gun drumming, it's clear MxPx mean business. Secret Weapon is restless, spirited, and truly infectious from the raucous woahs and bouncy bassline driving "Shut It Down" to the bristling energy and spitfire vocals of "Chop Shop" to the uplifting, grab-your-friends chorus of "Here's to the Life." Unsurprising topics like scene celebrity, encounters of the major-label kind, and sentiments of living life to the fullest are addressed via crashing, melodic choruses, yet MxPx sound surprisingly unjaded considering the decade-plus they've been around. But really making it all worthwhile is that these 16 hyper-charged tracks actually sound inspired -- with more grit than gloss this time around -- and well, MxPx finally sound like they're having fun again. The 2006 release Let's Rock found them merely going through the motions, but Secret Weapon finds the trio back on track like fans remember from years ago. Welcome back guys. ~ Corey Apar
CD€13.99

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1994 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

CD€9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2002 | SideOneDummy Records

CD€9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 7, 2005 | SideOneDummy Records

CD€9.99

Rock - Released May 22, 2001 | Fat Wreck Chords

CD€2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 28, 2004 | SideOneDummy Records

CD€23.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

Compiling the driving output of the bands early years, Triple Shot gathers the first three albums from Washington punks, MxPx into one, three-disc collection. Featuring 1994’s Pokinatcha, 1995’s Teenage Politics, and 1996’s Life in General, the set represents a formative period in the band's sound, giving listeners a chance to hear the band working to find their sound before they would break out of the Christian charts and into the mainstream just a couple years later. While any hardcore fans will undoubtedly already own all of these records, Triple Shot is a great jumping-off point for this iconic pop-punk band, and anyone late to the MxPx party would do well to snap this collection up. ~ Gregory Heaney
CD€13.99

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2002 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

Rock - Released April 29, 2016 | Tooth & Nail, LLC

Download not available
CD€13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | A&M

Mike Herrera, Yuri Ruley, and Tom Wisniewski have been rocking the kids for Ten Years and Running, as their 2002 retrospective proudly puts it. While their third outing for A&M mostly traces the peaks and valleys of a bipolar relationship, tracks like "Play It Loud" and "Kings of Hollywood" assert the band's van-touring pride and dedication to "left coast punk rawk" [sic]. Reaching out to freshly minted suburbanite punk Benji Madden for guest vocals only solidifies the band's status as ten-and-five men. But Before Everything & After isn't the clutch home run it could have been. Instead of leading by example, the veteran trio has embraced the big-budget punk-pop treatment that regularly tweaks albums by junior leaguers like A New Found Glory or Madden's own Good Charlotte. Mixing from the ubiquitous Lord-Alge brothers squeegees clean each cut, plugging power chords into punchy drum fills, processing vocals to within an inch of their humanity, and putting pop accessibility way before any punk revivalist relevancy. You might recognize "Well Adjusted" from its role in a popular Pepsi commercial; in any case, its vintage Green Day crunch is powerful, yet utterly typical. The song's carefully cleansed grit will light up the LEDs on your car stereo, but if you can tell it apart from its brethren, you win a Hercules wristband. Following standard operating procedure, Before Everything's handful of rock anthems is accompanied by a sagging midsection of pop-punk power ballads. Cloying synths, treated piano, surging string sections, and robot vocal processing all busy up "Don't Walk Away" and "Quit Your Life," where Herrera's emotional perspective on a bicoastal romance amounts to ordering in Chinese food. Who started this epidemic of Hot Topic hair gel balladry? It deadens any energy given off by albums' rocking moments (here, the otherwise awesome "More Everything" withers next to the cello and violin of its crying cousin). Power ballads have no place in punk rock -- old or new, left coast or right. Sure, they're a great way to meet girls. Just ask Bon Jovi or Mötley Crüe, who were lighting lighters and banging heads when the Warped Tour Generation was still just a one-night stand. But the hair bands polished their metal machines with pop, and the glimmer didn't last. Punk-pop veterans like MxPx should have learned this lesson long ago. Instead, Before Everything & After is a radio-friendly flameout that's sound-alike safe for a quick and easy sell. ~ Johnny Loftus
CD€9.99

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1995 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

CD€13.99

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1995 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

CD€19.49

Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1994 | Tooth & Nail (TNN)

On its debut album, POKINATCHA, the Washington State-based punk-pop trio MxPx (originally known as Magnified Plaid) offers up a restless set of tunes that is heavily influenced by Descendents, NOFX, and like-minded California acts. Fronted by singer/bassist Mike Herrera, the amiable trio established itself as the Tooth & Nail label's flagship band, finding success as a Christian-leaning counterpart to Green Day, as evinced on hard-charging three-chord tunes such as "Anywhere But Here" and "Realize." Although MxPx would go on to issue more accomplished outings, POKINATCHA is particularly notable as the group's only record to feature guitarist Andy Husted, who would be replaced by Tom Wisniewski in 1995.