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Pop - Released November 27, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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At the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus performed Midnight Sky (one of the singles from this seventh studio album) while swinging on a giant disco ball. But in contrast to Charlie Chaplin’s globe in The Dictator, this glittering ball did not explode at the end of the performance. The ex-Disney child star securely remained in place upon this symbol of disco music as if to demonstrate her freedom is indestructible and indissociable from her musical expression. In this song, she stresses that she “belongs to no one” and that she is “born to run”. But while the disco in this lively record is tinted with airs of punk and rock, there are still elements of bubble-gum pop that show that the past Cyrus has not completely disappeared. Prisoner is a perfect example of this with its persistent melody that lightly illustrates a more sophisticated, feminist theme and Cyrus’ assured and slightly gravelly voice. Plastic Rock embodies influences of some pop-rock and feminist icons from the 80s and 90s. The record sleeve’s design features photography from legendary rock photographer Mick Rock and outfits by the stylist Jean-Paul Gaultier – the ultimate proof of Cyrus’ Madonna-esque high-heeled feminist approach. The features and covers on this album follow the theme such as the jumbled duo Black Karma with Joan Jett (known for her cover of I Love Rock’n’Roll in 1982), as well as live covers of the Cranberries (Zombie) and Blondie (Heart of Glass). Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 4, 2013 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released August 13, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released May 31, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Younger Now is a bit of a sly nod to a public who watched Miley Cyrus explore a defiantly loud post-adolescence: she may be older, but she's not necessarily grown up. The joke is, Younger Now is most certainly an album that announces Miley's mature phase, a record that shakes off the druggy haze of Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz -- an album cut at the height of her infatuation with the Flaming Lips -- yet retains the services of Oren Yoel, a producer/songwriter who collaborated with her on that 2015 digital-only effort. That's the first sign that Younger Now may not be the back-to-the-roots move its retro-iconography and Dolly Parton duet may suggest. Certainly, there are country-ish songs scattered throughout the album -- a hoedown and a waltz, but mostly ballads -- but they're delivered with an arched eyebrow, a distancing effect accentuated by how the album unfurls with a pair of songs where Cyrus brightens up the Californian melancholy of Lana Del Rey. Despite a showstopping performance or two, the kind of pyrotechnics that sound ripped from the heart, sadness isn't Miley's thing. Her specialty is good times, either raving until the early dawn or chilling out on the beach...or maybe whiling away the hours online. Without ever succumbing to the garish neon extremes of Bangerz or the hangover ache of Dead Petz, Younger Now touches upon each of these obsessions and then wraps them in a tidy package. Occasionally, this slick veneer can masquerade the Internet irony of an individual song -- "Week Without You" plays like a Grease parody, the Dolly duet "Rainbowland" suggests a theme park of dancing GIFs -- but the professionalism of both the production and the performance highlights Cyrus' savvy skills. Younger Now reveals she's as comfortable crafting a plaintive country ballad ("Miss You So Much") as effervescent disco ("Thinkin'"), and the fact that these two seemingly disparate styles sit next to each other not altogether comfortably speaks to how Miley Cyrus' aesthetic is thoroughly modern. She may not bother with EDM drops or murmured vocals -- she's justifiably proud of flaunting her voice -- but she perceives no line dividing the past and the present, eagerly dressing up old-fashioned forms in newfangled sounds. If Younger Now seems slightly scattered as it flits from song to song, it nevertheless adds up to a portrait of a pop star so confident of her swagger, she doesn't bother with such niceties as old-fashioned flow. She knows she's got style for miles and miles, enough to keep her afloat when the time comes that she delivers her country tunes with acoustic guitars, not digital instruments, and she has the wisdom to know that snappy sheen is precisely what this particular album needs. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 27, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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At the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus performed Midnight Sky (one of the singles from this seventh studio album) while swinging on a giant disco ball. But in contrast to Charlie Chaplin’s globe in The Dictator, this glittering ball did not explode at the end of the performance. The ex-Disney child star securely remained in place upon this symbol of disco music as if to demonstrate her freedom is indestructible and indissociable from her musical expression. In this song, she stresses that she “belongs to no one” and that she is “born to run”. But while the disco in this lively record is tinted with airs of punk and rock, there are still elements of bubble-gum pop that show that the past Cyrus has not completely disappeared. Prisoner is a perfect example of this with its persistent melody that lightly illustrates a more sophisticated, feminist theme and Cyrus’ assured and slightly gravelly voice. Plastic Rock embodies influences of some pop-rock and feminist icons from the 80s and 90s. The record sleeve’s design features photography from legendary rock photographer Mick Rock and outfits by the stylist Jean-Paul Gaultier – the ultimate proof of Cyrus’ Madonna-esque high-heeled feminist approach. The features and covers on this album follow the theme such as the jumbled duo Black Karma with Joan Jett (known for her cover of I Love Rock’n’Roll in 1982), as well as live covers of the Cranberries (Zombie) and Blondie (Heart of Glass). Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released August 16, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released June 22, 2021 | Blackened Recordings - Universal Music

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Pop - Released September 29, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Hollywood Records

If Breakout began to establish Miley Cyrus as a singing star in her own right, free of Hannah Montana baggage, then Time of Our Lives is another confident step in that direction. The Time of Our Lives still boasts a couple of frothy, Hannah-esque party anthems, the title track and "Party in the USA." Though Cyrus' voice borders on shrill on both songs, they'll please Montana fans (that goes double for the live version of "Before the Storm" with the Jonas Brothers). However, when she lets her inner rock chick and ballad-singing diva come to the fore, Cyrus really shines: the lead track "Kicking and Screaming" has more guts and swagger than anything else she has recorded, and "Talk Is Cheap" underscores that she has a real flair for rock -- albeit of the well-groomed, Disney-fied variety. She is just as accomplished on the EP's ballads, particularly "Obsessed." Cyrus has always sounded older than her years, and as she leaves her teens, that's a good thing -- especially since The Time of Our Lives shows her music is catching up to her pipes. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 30, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Ever since her Hannah Montana days, when she balanced Disney pop with rootsier songs, Miley Cyrus has proven that she's versatile. Though she spent years distancing herself from those beginnings, her eclectic approach continued as she flirted with more mature versions of pop, dance, and hip-hop. While her previous transitions were seamless, she revels in warts-and-all indulgence on Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz. A whopping 92 minutes long, Cyrus' fifth full-length is a space pop album, a dance album, and a tripped-out singer/songwriter album -- and its best moments are among the most genuine music she's made. She sounds as brash and earnest as the people her age who, because they're not world-famous pop stars, head off to college and expand their horizons, musical and otherwise. Since Cyrus is a world-famous pop star, her horizon-expanding includes collaborations with the Flaming Lips, Ariel Pink, and Phantogram's Sarah Barthel. Lips fans know that the band will collaborate with just about anyone, but their involvement in Dead Petz doesn't feel like a stunt. Hearing their lush oddities combined with her vocal chops makes for some of the brightest highlights: "The Floyd Song (Sunrise)" boasts more of the band's signature euphoria than much of their 2010s output, while "Evil Is But a Shadow"'s gloomy introspection sounds even eerier with Cyrus singing it. Here and throughout Dead Petz, it's all about the contrasts. Cyrus opens the album with "Dooo It!," one of the most aggressive tracks here, and follows it with one of the sweetest, "Karen Don't Be Sad." Later, she spans the frank sexuality of "Bang Me Box" and the jokey sentimentality of "Pablow the Blowfish," a tale of love and sushi gone wrong. Later on, Cyrus revisits some of Bangerz's sounds and collaborators: with a few tweaks, "Lighter" and "Fweaky" (both produced by Mike WiLL Made It) could get airplay on Top 40 radio; meanwhile, the hazy Big Sean reunion "Tangerine" and bittersweet Oren Yoel production "Space Boots" have a very different kind of party vibe than Cyrus' previous album. Dead Petz's sprawl also finds her moving into synth pop territory more convincingly than might be expected, whether she's duetting with Barthel on the standout "Slab of Butter (Scorpion)" or emphasizing her raspy, Stevie Nicks-like drawl on the driving "1 Sun." At times, the album is as annoying as feared, peppered with ramblings that must have been a blast to make but aren't necessarily as much fun for the audience, such as the self-explanatory "I'm So Drunk." Songs like this reflect how the album wears its faults on its sleeve: it's too long and Cyrus sometimes tries too hard, but she uses the freedom this kind of guerrilla release affords to the hilt: freedom to be vulnerable, freedom to be sexual, freedom to make mistakes. Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz needs an editor, but there's more than enough worthwhile music here to transcend shock value. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Hollywood Records

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Pop - Released June 14, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Hollywood Records

Miley Cyrus' Time of Our Lives EP spawned the carefree mega-hit “Party in the U.S.A.,” but on her second album, she does just about everything she can to distance herself from that look and sound to announce that she has grown up. On Can’t Be Tamed’s cover, she’s clad in black from her heavily lined eyes to the tips of her toes, sporting pale skin and chestnut hair several shades darker than Hannah Montana blonde. The album’s sound is several shades darker too, but within reason; while none of these songs sounds like it belongs on one of her alter ego’s albums, Can’t Be Tamed was released by Hollywood Records, Disney’s more mature imprint. So while “Liberty Walk”'s bold synths and beats and rapped verses sound edgier than any of Cyrus' previous work, upbeat lyrics like “Don’t live a lie/This is your life” keep the song Radio Disney-friendly. She also tries this dancefloor-ready sound out for size on “Who Owns My Heart,” the stomping title track, and “Permanent December,” which apes the Auto-Tuned rapping of Kesha's “Tik Tok” minus that song’s mindless fun, which is actually a recurring problem on Can’t Be Tamed: too often, Cyrus equates grown-up with joyless, and songs like “Scars” reach for an emotional depth that isn’t there. Though pop was Cyrus' bread and butter during her Hannah years, the album’s synth-dominated tunes don’t jell with her voice; she sounds more natural and more grown-up on the songs that straddle rock and country, including the revved-up cover of Poison's “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” and the anthemic “Two More Lonely People,” which makes the most of her voice and appeal as they are. Even occasionally overwrought ballads like “Stay” and “Take Me Along” are a more organic fit for the singer she has been and could become. At times Can’t Be Tamed feels perfunctory, doing the job of showing Cyrus is growing up without making her too mature for her still-young fan base and little else. She’s taken another step away from Hannah here, but there should be room for fun even in more adult musical territory. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 22, 2008 | Universal Music Group International

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Pop - Released February 5, 2021 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released May 11, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released July 22, 2008 | Hollywood Records

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Pop - Released May 31, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released June 26, 2007 | Hollywood Records

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Miley Cyrus in the magazine
  • 2020's Disco Revival: Miley Cyrus!
    2020's Disco Revival: Miley Cyrus! At the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus performed Midnight Sky}(one of the singles from this seventh studio album) while swinging on a giant disco ball. But in contrast to Charlie Chaplin’s...