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Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released November 5, 2013 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released April 30, 2004 | RCA Red Seal

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
While no one would put Leonard Slatkin's recordings of the orchestral works of Edward Elgar in the same exalted league as the recordings of Barbirolli or Boult -- recordings that stand among the greatest of anything ever recorded -- no one would dispute that Slatkin's recordings are nevertheless among the best recordings of the works in the past 20 years. Slatkin's understanding of Elgar's music and his ability to articulate both its grandly monumental and its deeply intimate qualities is unsurpassed among his contemporaries and his interpretations are marvelously controlled and wonderfully expressive. Of course, Slatkin is aided by the strong and sympathetic playing of the London Philharmonic and by the soulful virtuosity of violinist Pinchas Zukerman and cellist Janos Starker. And RCA does capture all their performances in clear, deep, and warm digital sound. While no one who loves Elgar's music should be without Barbirolli and Boult's recordings, anyone who loves Elgar's music would like Slatkin's recordings. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released September 1, 2003 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions Diapason découverte
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Symphonic Music - Released April 2, 2013 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This recording of Rachmaninov's Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op. 44, and Symphonic Dances, Op. 45, is notable in the history of American classical music over and above its specifically musical qualities, for it marks the phoenix-like revival of an orchestra given up for dead. As the finances of America's hardest-hit city declined during the 2007-2010 recession, the orchestra suffered a crippling strike and general gloom about its future. Due not least to the leadership of music director Leonard Slatkin, the organization has rebounded and launched a modest recording program. What's perhaps most exciting about that is the reentry of Detroit's Orchestra Hall, fabled for the recordings made by conductor Paul Paray for the Mercury label's Living Presence series, into the catalog. It is an exceptional 1920s space, modest in size and warm in sound, in all ways closer to what Rachmaninov would have imagined for his music than the modernist sarcophagi with which so many such halls have been replaced. You even get a picture of the hall wedged into Naxos' unvarying design. Slatkin has talked in the past about how he adapts his Rachmaninov performances to this space, and he does so again here. The more garish aspects of the Symphonic Dances, with its Dies irae quotation morphing into a Russian Alleluia, and the percussion parts generally, are kept under control, while the symphony's glorious melodies, the last stand of the Romantic era in 1936, are allowed to flower luxuriantly. A crack Russian or British orchestra might be smoother in places, but there is a confident musicality here that is immensely appealing, and it has everything to do with a group of young players who realize that they are under the gun and have what it takes to succeed, under seasoned leadership. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 1, 2001 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 1987 | Angel Records

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Chandos

Booklet
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Symphonic Music - Released June 1, 2000 | Chandos

Booklet
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Symphonic Music - Released April 1, 2016 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Symphonic Music - Released January 26, 2010 | Naxos

Booklet
Rachmaninov's First Symphony, for any number of reasons, received one of the most venomous, disdainful premieres in music history. Everything from the score itself to unprepared musicians to a supposedly drunken conductor (Glazunov) has been blamed for its icy reception. No matter the cause, the result was a devastated composer who was not to return to the form for more than a decade, and only then after the assistance of a hypnotherapist. The Second Symphony, heard here on this Naxos disc, was a complete rebirth for Rachmaninov and was received with great acclaim. Its American premiere was conducted by Modeste Altschuler, the great uncle of conductor Leonard Slatkin. How appropriate it is, then, that the Detroit Symphony Orchestra should celebrate its own new beginnings with Slatkin, who was principal conductor during the 2008-2009 season. The revitalized sound Slatkin draws from the DSO is simply superb, reaffirming its position as one of the country's preeminent orchestras. The strings produce a rich, velvety texture with powerful, penetrating violins all the way down to marvelously articulated, robust basses. The rest of the orchestra sounds just as good, in particular the vigorous brass section. Slatkin's interpretation of this great symphony is sweeping in its scope while obviously paying meticulous attention to every detail and nuance written in the score. From the breathtakingly romantic third movement to the fiery, agitated Scherzo, the DSO and Slatkin offer listeners a first-rate recording and a deeply satisfying musical experience. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 12, 1994 | RCA Red Seal

There comes a time when you just have to grow up and face the fact that Aaron Copland really was the great American composer of the twentieth century. Everyone knows his music and everyone loves his music. And the more Copland you listen to, the better he gets. Even his film scores have great stuff in them. The big tunes, the populist rhetoric, the brilliant orchestral colors, and the sense of awe and transcendence that are the hallmarks of his best music can be heard in his film music. In this recording by Leonard Slatkin and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Copland's film music gets the full Technicolor treatment. Their music from The Red Pony has its humor, grandeur, and an aching lyricism. Their suite from Our Town has its stoicism and its romanticism. The suite from The Heiress has its pathos and irony. Their Music for Movies has its bathos and bombast. And their closing Prairie Journal has its epic scope and occasionally trivial tunes. Slatkin leads with energy and conviction. The St. Louis plays with subtleness and strength. RCA's early-'90s digital sound is warm and rich and full. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 27, 2018 | RCA Red Seal

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Symphonic Music - Released September 3, 2013 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released February 1, 2004 | Chandos

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 1, 1993 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released May 14, 1991 | RCA Classics

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1990 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 26, 2011 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released January 1, 1989 | Angel Records