Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released August 22, 2006 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
German tenor Jonas Kaufmann is among the more versatile of today's singers, with a recorded catalog that stretches from later Italian opera to French works and even Schubert songs. This release suggests, however, that Wagner is his true métier. A Wagner greatest-hits album isn't really possible given the nature of his work, but this could work well as a collection of Wagner selections: it includes excerpts from works from the early Rienzi up to the "Ring" cycle, with an orchestral version of the Wesendonck-Lieder song cycle to bring down the curtain. And Kaufmann solidly grasps the different musical idioms; "Allmächtiger Vater, blick herab!" (Almighty Father, look down!), from Rienzi, is close to a conventional aria, while the selections from Die Walküre and Siegfried consist of a sort of dialogic melody, carried out at perilously high pitches over long stretches of music. Kaufmann has the power to pull off the high notes without a trace of distortion or loss of the thread of the action, and equally to excel in the less athletic idiom of the songs. He gets able support from the Orchestra of the German Opera Berlin under Donald Runnicles. Recommended for all levels of Wagner listeners. © TiVo
From
CD€24.99

Classical - Released June 13, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Month - Diamant d'Opéra - 4 étoiles Classica
One of the outstanding qualities of this recording of Fidelio from the 2010 Lucerne Festival is the depth of the casting, down to the smallest roles; the singers in secondary and tertiary parts may not be internationally renowned, but they all deliver first-rate performances. Having a singer of Peter Mattei's stature and distinctiveness as Don Fernando, who doesn't even show up until the finale, is real luxury casting. Soprano Rachel Harnisch, bass Christof Fischesser, and tenor Christoph Strehl as Marzelline, Rocco, and Jaquino, are not widely familiar names, but their performances are simply superb, sharply characterized, and beautifully sung. Harnisch and Strehl's duet that opens the opera establishes the expectation that this is going to be an exceptional performance, and when the quartet is joined by Fischesser and Nina Stemme in the title role, it is a marvel of musical subtlety and emotional complexity. Falk Struckmann is not entirely consistent as Don Pizarro; his presence is effectively menacing, but in the first act he tends to sound forced and his intonation in occasionally questionable. By the second act he seems to have found his footing and is far more persuasive. Tenor Jonas Kaufmann delivers a powerfully dramatic performance and sounds even more baritonal than he usually does, which is appropriate for this role, especially in the aria that opens Act II. Stemme doesn't come across with the personal force the role requires, but her singing is lovely and expressive throughout. Claudio Abbado leads the Mahler Chamber Orchestra/Lucerne Festival Orchestra and Arnold Schoenberg Chor in a terrific performance of the score, by turns urgently propulsive and achingly lyrical. His insightful pacing and the sensitive orchestral playing contribute hugely to the impact of the performance. The sound is clean and detailed, but the voices generally could afford to be slightly more present; they certainly aren't swamped by the orchestra but balance would have been finer if the soloists had been more in the foreground. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Opera Extracts - Released September 13, 2013 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
German tenor Jonas Kaufmann has been laying a strong claim to the legacy of the superstar tenors of the 1980s and 1990s, but until now it hasn't been completely clear that Verdi, the tenor's bread and butter, was a fully compelling part of his arsenal. With this release, Kaufmann puts any doubts to rest and steps up in a big way to his signing by the Sony Classical label and its attendant operatic muscle. The sheer ease of Kaufmann's voice in its upper register is about to get to casual opera fans in a big way (and he's a bit hipper than Pavarotti or even Domingo ever were), and right now the sky would seem to be the limit to his popularity. Yet there is plenty here for opera scorekeepers to dig their teeth into, and it seems likely that Kaufmann will come out very well with them, too. Consider the high C at the end of "Di quella pira" from Il trovatore: surely few tenors in history have hit it out of the park the way Kaufmann does. There is a good mix of hits from various parts of Verdi's career and some lesser-known pieces, and the album is all newly performed, not a collection of things recorded at different times. It has a sense of confidence, purpose, and commitment to the text (no soulless technical perfection here), and it's a joy for listeners at all levels. With recent Wagnerian (and Straussian) triumphs under his belt, Kaufmann seems to be entering a period where he can do pretty much anything and probably will. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released September 12, 2014 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released October 5, 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
From
CD€14.99

Opera Extracts - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
Jonas Kaufmann has taken care in his professional choices not to be pigeonholed and has successfully tackled roles in German, French, and Italian operas ranging from Monteverdi and Mozart to Schoenberg and world premieres, as well as singing lieder and symphonic works. These verismo arias show off Kaufmann's mastery of this repertoire and his ease in bringing an authentically Italianate sensibility to this music. The recital includes a good mix of the familiar, the off-the-beaten-track, and the genuinely obscure. In the last category are some real gems, including arias from Zandonai's Giulietta e Romeo and Ponchielli's I Lituani, both dramatically charged pieces notable for their overt expressiveness and lyricism. All of Kaufmann's performances have a riveting intensity and display his investment in bringing the characters fully to life; he invests all his roles with intelligence and intense feeling. His voice tends to have a baritonal quality that serves him well in some repertoire, but he's in complete control of an expansive palette of colors and is able to deliver beautifully calibrated readings of these diverse arias, from the melancholy tenderness of the opening of "Lamento di Federico" from Cilea's L'Arlesiana to the gritty anguish of "Vesti la giubba" to the romantic effusions of "Vicino a te" from Andrea Chénier, in which he's paired with soprano Eva-Marie Westbroek. What remains constant throughout is his clarion vocal power, which is evident whether it's being given full rein or held in check. He is also a master of the broadly arching lyrical phrase, which makes him ideally suited to these passionate roles. He has first-rate support from Antonio Pappano, an exceptionally gifted opera conductor, leading the Chorus and Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Roma. Decca's sound is clean and the balance is excellent. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released September 11, 2015 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The most German of tenors, Jonas Kaufmann, tackles a new Italian recital, following 2013's The Verdi Album, which was released to mark the composer's bicentenary. Today, Kaufmanndedicates an entire disc to the operas of Puccini. The all-important pieces are naturally found in the form of the "Recondita armonia" from Tosca, and "O soave Fanciulla" from La Bohème. Also of note are "No piangere, Liù!", from Turandot, and some special moments on less-performed works such as Le Villi ("Ei giunge!") and Edgar ("Orgia, chimera dall'occhio vitreo").Kaufmann does not seek, in any way, to copy Italian tenors or the Italianate mode of singing. Instead he yearns for a fidelity and purity of expression, as well as an absolute respect for the original works. This tenor moves us subtly away from what we are used to; which will delight some, and astonish the rest. Is this how Puccini really meant for his work to sound?
From
HI-RES€18.99
CD€15.99

Classical - Released September 15, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This record sees the most francophone (and francophile) of the German tenors take up a few pearls from the French repertoire. What's more, it's not only the big hits: "La fleur que tu m’avais jetée" is up in front, but also – or even, first and foremost – much rarer pearls have been fished up from the shoals of Meyerbeer, Berlioz, Thomas or Lalo. Jonas Kaufmann has succeeded in developing an irreproachable French elocution, in an equally impeccable style, denuded of the base Italianisms – glissandos, cooing, sobs, parasitic diphthongs, fermatas on the high Cs, etc. – that so many tenors (Italians, yes, but also French singers, including some stars...) impose on this music, which is not built to support them. Kaufmann's voice, which almost approaches a baritone, confers a different masculinity onto these roles (which is neither a virtue nor a vice, but a fundamental quality) and a depth for which the roles of Nadir, Don José or Werther all cry out. Moreover, Kaufmann's dynamic palette, from the fullest fortissimo to the suavest murmur, including on the high notes, is a joy to behold. The excellent Ludovic Tézier provides his counterpart in the duo of Pêcheurs de perles, while Sonia Yoncheva takes on the role of the tender Manon - even if the latter's French still leaves a little to be desired. © SM/Qobuz
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
In a fascinating interview in the CD program notes, German tenor Jonas Kaufmann and pianist Helmut Deutsch discuss interpretive issues that Die schöne Müllerin raises, particularly whether the singer is meant to present the point of view of neutral narrator (a view of one of the composer's contemporaries) or the lovesick young miller himself. These performers come down strongly on the side of the singer being the miller, except in the sections that the poet specifically designates as the words of the stream that flows by the mill. Kaufmann's performance powerfully bears out his conviction; he brings an Italianate, even verismo intensity to the passions of the young man at first so hopeful in love, and then shattered by his beloved's rejection. It's not a version that will necessarily please purists who demand fidelity to the performance practice of the composer's era, but other listeners may find the hot-blooded intensity of Kaufmann's passion thrilling. (Even those who might not approve would have to admit that the singer offers thoughtfully considered, reasonable explanations for his interpretive choices.) In Kaufmann's interpretation, the young miller starts out as a true innocent who is dazzled by the power of his first infatuation, and then gradually unravels with the revelation that his love is hopeless. The singer offers this interpretive decision as an explanation for why he wanted to record the cycle while his voice was still young, since this is inherently a young man's music and story. Kaufmann beautifully captures the arc of the story from the carefree joy of the first songs, through a dawning understanding of reality, to complete despair. His voice darkens and roughens as the songs progress, and the seventeenth and eighteenth, "Die böse Farbe" and "Trockne Blumen," have a surprisingly feral abandon. Deutsch, playing a modern instrument, offers a supple and passionate accompaniment that matches Kaufmann's interpretation. The sound of Decca's recording, made at a live 2009 performance in Munich, is clean and clear, with good balance and a warmly present ambience. © TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released August 22, 2006 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
German tenor Jonas Kaufmann is among the more versatile of today's singers, with a recorded catalog that stretches from later Italian opera to French works and even Schubert songs. This release suggests, however, that Wagner is his true métier. A Wagner greatest-hits album isn't really possible given the nature of his work, but this could work well as a collection of Wagner selections: it includes excerpts from works from the early Rienzi up to the "Ring" cycle, with an orchestral version of the Wesendonck-Lieder song cycle to bring down the curtain. And Kaufmann solidly grasps the different musical idioms; "Allmächtiger Vater, blick herab!" (Almighty Father, look down!), from Rienzi, is close to a conventional aria, while the selections from Die Walküre and Siegfried consist of a sort of dialogic melody, carried out at perilously high pitches over long stretches of music. Kaufmann has the power to pull off the high notes without a trace of distortion or loss of the thread of the action, and equally to excel in the less athletic idiom of the songs. He gets able support from the Orchestra of the German Opera Berlin under Donald Runnicles. Recommended for all levels of Wagner listeners. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€18.99
CD€15.99

Classical - Released April 7, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Gustav Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde is a symphony of six songs, usually performed by a tenor and a mezzo-soprano or baritone, as specified in the score. This 2017 Sony Classical release features superstar tenor Jonas Kaufmann as the soloist throughout, so the expected alternation of singers is replaced with one artist's unified interpretation. Joined by Jonathan Nott and the Vienna Philharmonic, Kaufmann displays a phenomenal tessitura that enables him to sing the tenor songs with great intensity while losing little of that power in his lower range. Even so, there is a qualitative difference between Kaufmann as tenor, where his tone is penetrating and heroic, and Kaufmann as baritone, where his voice is much rounder, warmer, and intimate. Listeners may be surprised to find both qualities side by side in "Der Einsame im Herbst," "Von der Schönheit," and most significantly, in "Der Abschied," a baritone song that Kaufmann has long wished to make his own. This is an innovative approach to performing Das Lied von der Erde that may unsettle traditionalists and purists, but Kaufmann's passionate singing and Nott's insightful direction make this an important recording of the work, quite apart from considerations of the composer's intentions. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€18.99
CD€15.99

Classical - Released November 13, 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released June 12, 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
It has been a while since major studios gave up recording operas in studio due to a lack of investment and profitability. But the world-renowned reputation of Jonas Kaufmann has incited Sony Classical to record and produce this new version of Verdi’s Othello in studio in the “traditional style”. The work was produced over twelve days of session recording in the generous acoustics of the splendid Parco della Musica built in Rome by the architect Renzo Piano. It is no exaggeration when we say that this is a truly astounding version of Verdi’s masterpiece that stands shoulder to shoulder with the legendary versions of the flamboyant Toscanini (1947), the winning trio Vickers-Rysanek-Gobbi of Serafin (1960) and also the electrifying live performance of Carlos Kleiber (1976). There are of course many others of diverse merit but none so utterly satisfying.Jonas Kaufmann has waited patiently before taking on the compelling title role, singing previously as Cassio in Chicago before playing Otello in London in 2017 under the passionate direction of Antonio Pappano (interpretation available on DVD). Here, the same conductor is at helm of the supercharged and on great form, Orchestre de l’Académie Sainte-Cécile in Rome. Alongside his strong, moving, impulsive and ultimately fragile depiction of Otello, Jonas Kaufmann is joined by Federica Lombardi’s sublime Desdemona and Carlos Álvarez’s solid take on the sordid, treacherous and conniving Iago. Liparit Avetisyan and Carlo Bossi, who play Cassio and Rodrigo respectively, provide this ensemble with a perfect harmony. The sound recording provides a great presence to this vocal and instrumental delight and does justice to the aggression and violent colouring of Verdi’s final drama as the composer proves more than ever to be a match for Shakespeare. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
Although Covid-19 has forced many musicians to cancel their concerts and recordings in 2020, it has also sparked creativity and allowed people to enjoy calmer moments – something that’s rare when you have a busy career. Jonas Kaufmann did not waste his time during lockdown, recording several Lieder albums with his accomplice, the pianist Helmut Deutsch.“Selige Stunde” (“Blessed Hours!”) is the first fruit of his quarantine which brings together a selection of Lieder from Mozart to Mahler, including Schubert, Mendelssohn, Grieg, Strauss, Brahms, Wolf, Schumann and extremely rare gems such as Ännchen von Tharau by Friedrich Silcher or the unusual In mir klingt ein Lied composed by Alois Melichar on the Etude, Op. 10 No. 3 by Chopin.Time and intensive use have gradually tarnished Jonas Kaufmann's voice and his timbre has darkened without compromising any of its expression or exceptional range. With quarantine making it impossible to use a recording studio, the two friends recorded this album in a private home with as few people as possible. It’s a “blessing in disguise” for Jonas Kaufmann and Helmut Deustch, who were able to find the tone of a private concert in the intimacy of a living room for this recording. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released February 17, 2014 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
A superstar of opera, Jonas Kaufmann is somewhat less renowned for his interpretations of art songs, though this 2014 Sony release of Franz Schubert's Winterreise is his second disc in the genre, following his 2009 recording of Die schöne Müllerin for Decca. Even though it's more recognizable in the context of his Wagner and Verdi roles, Kaufmann's fluid and strongly supported tenor voice is well-suited to Schubert's arching lines and lyrical expressions, and its warm tone and rich timbres convey a variety of moods and emotions with minimal effort and no strain. Kaufmann and his longtime accompanist Helmut Deutsch have performed this song cycle in recital many times, and this performance reflects an ease and familiarity with the material and each other's timing that seem quite natural and spontaneous. Sony's recording does justice to the vocal part and the accompaniment by evenly balancing them in the mix, rather than recessing the piano to favor the singer. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€18.99
CD€15.99

Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
After records dedicated to Berlin in the 1930s, or to the Italy of La Dolce Vita, now Jonas Kaufmann is offering us some sugary Viennese delights, in keeping with the spirit of his 2014 album Du bist die Welt für mich, which covers German and Viennese operetta from 1925 to 1935. This new release rounds off an eternal and unchanging vision of an imagined Vienna. The net is cast wide, with works by Johann Strauss Jr., Robert Stolz and Franz Lehár, matched by pearls from lesser-known composers (Kalman, Zeller, Leopoldi, Weinberger, Benatzky, Kreuder, Georg Kreisler), who each bring their own stone to this monument to the great capital of music. While you might catch yourself humming along to Wiener Blut with Jonas Kaufmann (here with Rachel Willis-Sørensen), this superbly put-together programme offers some pleasant surprises in the form of unknown airs. Most luxurious of all is the discreet, never-invasive accompaniment from the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, in disguise here as an opulent "faubourg orchestra", most ably conducted by the Hungarian Adam Fischer. It's folk music of course, but sung with a supreme elegance and the technique of an opera singer at the height of their vocal and expressive powers. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
Some spectacular efforts in standard operatic roles have brought tenor Jonas Kaufmann to the point of emerging as the current generation's Pavarotti or Domingo, and the release of an album of popular Italian songs fits into the marketing plan. Said plan comes complete with brutally stereotyped verbiage in the graphics ("even in the darkest moment, the Italian finds a way to put a little bit of powdered sugar on top and to continue finding sweetness in life") that have supposedly come from Kaufmann himself, purported to have a special understanding of the culture because, growing up in Munich, he was only a day's drive away from Italy. The plan may well succeed. Kaufmann is in fine voice, and this alone will appeal to his growing legion of fans. He respects the basic simplicity of the material, never overwhelming it with vocal heroics. And he's got a good, organic program of Italian and Neapolitan classics to work with, avoiding chestnuts, pulling a few rarities off the scrap heap of history, and incorporating some of the recent additions that show the continuing vitality of this tradition. These include the Nino Rota Godfather classic "Parla più piano" and a song, Lucio Dalla's Caruso, originally written for the aging Pavarotti. If you're going to compete with him, you'd better bring your A game, and Kaufmann's technically unimpeachable, but curiously detached, reading doesn't cut it. The Orchestra del Teatro Massimo di Palermo under Asher Fisch has the right slightly loose sound for the music, and there are many tunes that may well connect with one or another individual listener. Sample to see if Kaufmann's way with these evergreen songs is for you. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€13.49
CD€9.99

Classical - Released June 15, 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Classical - Released September 17, 2021 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet

Classical - Released December 12, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available

Artist

Jonas Kaufmann in the magazine