Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 4, 2018 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month - 5 étoiles de Classica
Mozart and his family spent 15 months in London when the composer was eight years old. In London he wrote his first symphonies and first vocal works, serving major notice to the world. Those have been recorded before and are included here, but what's novel is the inclusion of music by other composers whom Mozart would have heard in London. Many of the works here receive their premiere recordings, and The Mozartists and conductor Ian Page ably sketch the influences they likely had on Mozart. Some of the influences from J.C. Bach have been recognized before, but Page goes more deeply into them: you can hear Mozart's way of assigning expressive meaning to transitional passagework, uncanny already at age eight, in the music of the "London Bach." Sample the Harpsichord Concerto in D major, Op. 1, No. 6. Elsewhere, there is English- and Italian-language vocal music by Thomas Arne, Samuel Arnold, Egidio Duni (with a very patter-song-like aria inserted into an opera based on Richardson's novel Pamela), Giovanni Battista Pescetti, William Bates, and Davide Perez, with varying degrees of a Mozartian quality, but all of it essentially unknown and largely worth hearing. The influences run thick in the other orchestral pieces included: a three-movement overture in the manner of Giovanni Battista Sammartini by George Rush, and the Symphony in E flat major, Op. 7, No. 6, of Carl Friedrich Abel, which manages to contain pre-echoes of the Symphony No. 39 in E flat major, K. 543, and perhaps the Sinfonia Concertante in E flat major, K. 364. The collection is performed on not-overaggressive period instruments, and it would be enjoyable merely as a sketch of the world Mozart experienced in London. And it's even better than that. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Full Operas - Released October 13, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
The 15-year-old Mozart's Il Sogno di Scipione, K. 126, has not been much performed. It's too late to be truly the work of a prodigy, but not really a mature work, and it's not an opera but a serenata drammatica, a little one-act allegory in which the titular African king has to choose between Fortune and Constancy, prepared for the same Archbishop Colloredo who would later make Mozart's life hell. However, it followed the genuine opera Mitridate, re di Ponto, K. 87, and its big arias arguably mark an advance over that more successful work. Sample the arias by Scipione and Fortuna (Fortune): they are laid out on grand harmonic plans, and they offer technical challenges surmounted elegantly by tenor Stuart Jackson and soprano Soraya Mafi, respectively. If Mozart the vocal writer came into his own slightly before this, Mozart the aria composer took decisive steps forward here. Much credit is due to the ensemble Classical Opera and its conductor Ian Page, who get the precise combination of modest size and ambitious sweep needed to put this piece of early Mozart across. Although probably of most interest to serious Mozart fans, this is an enjoyable recording for anyone. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Classical - Released May 15, 2020 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€9.99

Opera - Released May 6, 2016 | Signum Records

Booklet
When it comes to Handel aria collections, it's the countertenors and sopranos that get all the recording time. The entirely beneficial trend of organizing these recordings by the people who sang the music in Handel's time may touch on a tenor here for the first time, and the effect is different from the various albums devoted to the soprano and countertenor repertoire. The tenor John Beard was not a flashy Italian import, but a native Englander, and he had a long career with Handel. He might, the detailed booklet observes, have sung Handel's anthems as a 12-year-old at the coronation of George II in 1727. One imagines that while Faustina Bordoni and Francesca Cuzzoni were making headlines by duking it out on-stage, connoisseurs preferred a quieter appreciation of Beard. There are several attractive features here, starting with the voice of tenor Allan Clayton: it seems suited to languid pastoral melodies, but explodes quite unexpectedly with power in the heroic ones. You get several chunks of music beyond single arias, including one by William Boyce (tracks 11-14), which breaks up the elevated Handelian mood nicely. The gentle playing of the choir and orchestra of Classical Opera under Ian Page fits the general concept well, and much of the material deserves a fresh, careful performance. Sample Clayton's extraordinarily graceful reading of "As steals the morn" from L'Allegro, il Penseroso, ed il Moderato (track ten), and enjoy! © TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Classical - Released May 13, 2020 | Signum Records

Hi-Res
From
CD€3.99

Punk / New Wave - Released July 8, 2008 | Detour Records

From
CD€9.99

House - Released July 15, 2012 | Ian Page

From
CD€3.99

Punk / New Wave - Released July 8, 2008 | Detour Records

From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Classical - Released April 29, 2020 | Signum Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Classical - Released March 11, 2020 | Signum Records

Hi-Res
From
CD€8.99

House - Released July 2, 2017 | Costello Presley